Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – George Monbiot rightly makes the point that a general attitude of kindness is a must for a functioning society – while lamenting that anything of the sort is all too often lacking from public policy choices. – James Di Fiore discusses Justin Trudeau’s failed attempt at a triangulation ...

Canadian Dimension: Unifor and Big Three Bargaining

Photo by CCPA Monitor • Unifor President Jerry Dias at Social Forum rally outside Canadian War Museum. In his essay of October 17, 2016, “Big Three Bargaining: Different Ways of Making History,” Sam Gindin provides an intriguing analysis of current negotiations between Unifor and the Detroit Three automakers. Beyond agreeing with his points about tough ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – The Star’s editorial board writes that while we can do more to provide supports to make workers less dependent on a single job, we shouldn’t pretend there’s nothing we can do to improve working conditions. And Lana Payne reminds Morneau and the Libs that there’s nothing inevitable about ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Thomas Walkom writes that the federal Libs’ idea of “real change” for the economy reflects nothing more than the same old stale neoliberal playbook: At its core, the federal government’s “bold” new plan for economic growth is strikingly familiar. The scheme, worked out by Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Jake Kivanc points out that what little job growth Canada can claim primarily involves precarious work. And Nora Loreto discusses the crucial link between labour and social change: (T)o confront climate change, we must imagine the role of workers in the transition to an oil-free economy: how ...

The Canadian Progressive: VICTORY: Parliament Repeals Harper’s Anti-Union Bills C-377 And C-525

The Trudeau government’s promise to repeal former prime minister Stephen Harper’s vicious anti-union laws is fulfilled as Parliament votes to adopt Bill C-4. The bill repeals Bill C-377 and Bill C-525, two of Harper’s most vicious laws. The post VICTORY: Parliament Repeals Harper’s Anti-Union Bills C-377 And C-525 appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Mainly Macro offers a useful definition of neoliberalism, while highlighting its relationship to austerity. And Ed Finn writes that we shouldn’t be too quick to presume neoliberalism is going to disappear just because it’s proven to be harmful in practice – and that it will take a massive ...

The Canadian Progressive: Canada, a welcoming country? The unaddressed issue of labour trafficking

The unaddressed issue of labour trafficking tarnishes Canada’s image as a compassionate and welcoming country. Temporary foreign worker programmes allow employers to violate migrant workers’ rights. The post Canada, a welcoming country? The unaddressed issue of labour trafficking appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Peter Fleming writes that the promise of entrepreneurial self-employment has given way to the nightmare of systematic precarious work: (T)he move to reclassify people as self-employed follows a very simple formula: it helps reduce labour costs and maximise profits for businesses that would rather use contractors than a ...

Canadian Dimension: Big Three Bargaining: Different Ways of Making History

Photo by Ford Motor Company Canadian autoworkers have long been pace setters in the Canadian labour movement and as soon as its most recent agreement with General Motors was ratified, Unifor (the successor in 2013 after the merger of CAW and CEP) laid claim to that agreement’s ‘historic’ status. It has now also been ratified ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Vanessa Williamson writes that plenty of Americans want to see wealthy individuals and corporations pay their fair share of taxes – only to have that strong desire ignored by policymakers. And Joseph Stiglitz and Erika Siu discuss the glaring need for stronger tax enforcement around the globe. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Alex Himelfarb discusses why a proportional electoral system can be expected to produce better and more representative public policy: The adversarial approach often means major policy lurches when the government changes. For example, the Harper government undid some important initiatives of the previous government, including the Kelowna Accord, ...

Joe Fantauzzi: Columbus is no hero of mine

Italian-North Americans — especially those of us with roots in the Mezzogiorno (and I include the Ciociaria and Abbruzzo here) — don’t need a Genoese genocidal rapist as our hero. It’s time to eliminate Columbus Day. It’s time for #IndigenousPeoplesDay   Some good reading and watching: ‘All Indians Are Dead?’ At Least That’s What Most Schools Teach ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – Bruce Johnstone notes that rather than further attacking public services which have already been under siege throughout his stay in office, Brad Wall and his government should be looking to question Saskatchewan’s inexplicable giveaways to businesses: Well, if Doherty is looking for some “low-hanging fruit” to make our ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Jim Stanford writes about the obvious problems with globalization as it’s currently structured – and the need to meaningfully take into account the public interest before anybody other than the investor class can be expected to participate in the process: The reality is that hundreds of millions of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Mary O’Hara notes that even a relatively modest and incomplete set of progressive policies has created some important movement toward reducing poverty. And conversely, Caroline Mortimer writes that child poverty is exploding under the Conservative majority government in the UK. – Dean Beeby reports on the cause ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – In The Public Interest studies how the privatization of services leads to increased inequality: In the Public Interest’s analysis of recent government contracting identifies five ways in which government privatization disproportionately hurts poor individuals and families… Creation of new user fees: The creation of new user fees to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Mariana Mazzucato makes the case for a progressive message of shared wealth creation: A progressive economic agenda must have at its heart an understanding of wealth creation as a collective process. Yes, businesses are wealth creators, but they do not create wealth alone. Workers, public institutions and civil ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Owen Jones offers his take on how the UK’s Labour Party should proceed following Jeremy Corbyn’s most recent leadership victory – and while the exact circumstances may not apply to the NDP’s upcoming leadership campaigns, his ideas as to how to combine the interests of base supporters and ...

Canadian Dimension: The sharing economy blues

On January 13, 2015, around 70 of Portland’s 460 Taxi cabs protested fair taxi laws by parking in Pioneer square. Organizers want city leaders to make ride-sharing companies play by the same rules as cabs and Town cars. Photo by Aaron Parecki. “Before the internet, renting a surfboard, a power tool or a parking space ...

Canadian Dimension: The blind alleys of “Generation Screwed”

Photo by Darren Stone, Victoria Times Colonist In recent years, much has been made about the experience of millennials in the contemporary economy. And this isn’t without reason: wages are low, education is expensive, housing is inaccessible and finding secure employment is increasingly difficult. There does need to be a discussion in our society about ...

Canadian Dimension: More smoke than substance in Canadian plans

Giant banner in Geneva Switzerland by campaigners for a universal basic income, May 14, 2016. Photo by Fabrice Coffrini/ AFP; posted on cyprusnews.eu. With the two largest Canadian provinces vowing to take a hard look at some form of basic income program and the federal minister for Families saying the idea merits debate, Canada has ...

Canadian Dimension: Taking Basic Income beyond the market: The Unconditional Autonomy Allowance

“Gears” by Eric Drooker. A collection of the artist’s works can be seen at ericdrooker.com. French Social Theorist André Gorz predicted that as technology rendered a growing portion of living labour increasingly superfluous to the production of commodities, the state would have to begin paying people to consume, independently of their participation in the labour ...

Canadian Dimension: A friendly disagreement

CGT demonstration in Marseille, May 26, 2016, part of nationwide strikes and protests against Hollande Socialist government’s antiunion labour bill. Posted on theguardian.com; By Bertrand Langlois/ AFP/Getty Images. One of Canada’s leading young Left economists, MICHAL ROZWORSKI is co-author of a forthcoming Verso book on economic planning. He is a union researcher and writer and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Michael Harris argues that it’s long past time for the Trudeau Libs to start living up to their oft-repeated promise of real change – rather than merely slapping a friendlier face on the same old regressive Con policies. – Tom Parkin notes that Canada’s working class has been ...