Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Anushka Asthana, Jessica Elgot and Rowena Mason report on Jeremy Corbyn’s path as Labour leader – which include genuinely moving the UK’s political centre of gravity to the left while improving his party’s electoral prospects in the process. – Andrew Boozary and Danielle Martin write that the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Kevin McKean discusses how inequality undermines the goal of ensuring a healthy population. Matt Bruenig examines new data showing that the concentration of wealth in the U.S. is getting more extreme by the year. Steven Pearlstein writes about new polling showing that the U.S. public strongly favours ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Steve Roth points out how extreme concentrations of wealth lead to poor economic and social outcomes: If wealth is consistently more widely dispersed — like it was after WW II — the extra spending that results causes more production. (Why, exactly, do you think producers produce things?) And ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – The Oxford Martin School has published a new report on the spread of inequality. And Noah Smith discusses the role of offshoring along with automation in stacking the economic deck against workers. – Meanwhile, Mike Blanchfield reports on the U.S.’ refusal to allow workers to participate in any ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Matthew Yglesias offers his take on how to strengthen the U.S.’ economy through full employment and improved wage and family benefits. And Richard Florida discusses how everybody can benefit if an increasingly important service sector starts to provide higher wages and better work: The only way to close ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – Ritika Goel writes that good jobs lead to all kinds of ancillary benefits to both the health of workers, and the strength of the overall economy: We are in a time of increasing part-time, casual, temporary and contract work, with less access to benefits, insurance and pensions. Women, ...

wmtc: what i’m reading: the radium girls by kate moore

Readers of a certain age might remember clocks and watches with glowing green dials. The dials were painted with radium, the radioactive element discovered by Marie Curie. We had clocks like this when I was growing up. I have a distinct memory of my mother saying, “The women who worked in the factories where these ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Andrew Jackson, Tavia Grant et al, Kate McInturff and Trish Hennessy each look at Statistics Canada’s new income data which shows worsening inequality and persistent poverty over the past decade. – Jordan Brennan offers a needed response to a Financial Accountability Office of Ontario report which is ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – George Monbiot offers his suggestion for a new political narrative to build a better world than the one currently dominated by neoliberalism: (B)y coming together to revive community life we, the heroes of this story, can break the vicious circle. Through invoking our capacity for togetherness and belonging, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Naomi Klein examines how climate change has contributed to a summer of extreme weather disasters, while David Suzuki highlights how we can work with nature to respond to increased flooding. And Emily Atkin discusses the outsized damage 90 corporate behemoths have done to our climate. – Meanwhile, Abacus ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Rachel Sherman writes about the steps taken by wealthy Americans to hide how much they spend to paper over income inequality: Over lunch in a downtown restaurant, Beatrice, a New Yorker in her late 30s, told me about two decisions she and her husband were considering. They were ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Matthew Hoffmann discusses the reality that addressing climate change will require substantial changes to how we currently live – but that we don’t have a reasonable choice but to put in the work to make the transition. – Michael Wolfson writes that the Libs’ plans to limit ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ben Chu reports on a new study showing that the UK’s economy is broken in failing to translate GDP gains into any help for workers whose wages are falling. And the Canadian Press reports on the latest survey showing how many Canadians are just barely getting by in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Ed Finn discusses how corporate giants exert far more influence than we generally know – or should be willing to accept. And Joseph Schwartz and Bhaskar Sunkara comment on the difficulty in achieving durable social-democratic policies while economic power is concentrated in the corporate elite. – Thomas ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Labour Day reading. – Ed Finn offers a reminder of the rights and benefits we now take for granted which were won only through labour organization: Look back at Canada’s 150-year history, and you’ll find that many of the basic rights and benefits we all enjoy were originally fought for and ...

wmtc: labour day 2017: demand more

CUPE Ontario’s striking new graphic urges us to be brave, to be bold, and to demand more. Those two words — demand more — deserve our attention. Every single law or regulation that protects us at work is a product of the labour movement. The right to days off. The right to a meal break. ...

In-Sights: Labour Day – Canadian heritage moment – Rerun

First published here in 2009 Flipping the radio dial on Labour Day I noticed CKNW’s Christy Clark featured a guest who seemed a strange choice on that day. It was a Fraser Institute automaton, there to talk once more about our “unsustainable medical system.” This is content that the silver-spooned Shaw Family, owners of Corus Radio, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – George Lakey describes how Denmark has built the world’s happiest society by building a political movement and an economic model centred around providing for everybody: Using the crisis as an opportunity, the Social Democrats secured the foundation of the Nordic model, the most successful economic national model ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2017 Links

The latest from the federal NDP’s leadership campaign. – Eric Grenier offers his take on the membership numbers released this week – including Jagmeet Singh’s impressive signup totals. And Sarah Boesveld summarizes the state of the campaign and what’s at stake. – Kevin Taghabon’s detailed interview with Guy Caron is worth a read in full, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Stefan Stern writes that our current corporate culture needs to be changed in ways going far beyond reining in excessive executive compensation: Wage inequality is also a symbol of something more fundamentally wrong in the business world. Too many corporations are competing to achieve the wrong results in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Alex Himelfarb writes about the need to expand our idea of what’s possible through collective action: Is Trump the product of over forty years of attacks on the very idea of government, of decades in which government seemed to back away from our lives, when the best it ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2017 Platform Analysis – Jagmeet Singh

Having once expressed my concern that Jagmeet Singh would use his front-runner status as a means to avoid releasing much policy, I’ll again note that he’s instead offered up a detailed and thoughtful policy agenda. And while much of what he’s presented is relatively similar to the contents of Ashton’s platform (and in some cases ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2017 Links

The latest from the federal NDP’s leadership campaign. – Althia Raj reports on the final membership numbers for the leadership campaign announced this week, showing a similar number of eligible voters to the 2012 campaign (at just over 120,000). And Eric Grenier chats with Aaron Wherry about the significance of the membership totals, while Kyle ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – David Sirota talks to Naomi Klein about the push by right-wing politicians and corporate media outlets alike to stifle any discussion of how fossil fuels contribute to the climate change fuelling Hurricane Harvey. Matt Taibbi laments how the media contributed to the development of a public so ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Owen Jones points out Portugal’s example as a demonstration that that there is indeed an alternative to austerity – and that it’s better for public finances as well as for social progress: During the years of cuts, charities warned of a “social emergency”. Now the Portuguese government can ...