Canadian Dimension: The dead end of wage labour

Occupy Detroit rally, Grand Circus Park, October 14, 2011. By Stiofan 1919 (Flickr). It is a central irony of the history of the Left that it so frequently comes to defend the very exploitive and unjust institutions that were its sworn enemies from the outset. One of these is certainly the sovereign nation state, the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Henning Meyer interviews Tony Atkinson about the readily-available options to combat inequality – with the first step being to make sure people actually have a voice in the decisions which define how wealth and power are allocated: So, if you dive into the potential solutions you seem to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Graham Lowe and Frank Graves examine the state of Canada’s labour market, and find a strong desire among workers for an activist government to ensure improved pay equality and social supports. Oxfam reaches similar conclusions in studying workers and employers in Scotland. And Emma Teitel reports on ...

Canadian Dimension: Winnipeg conference looks at real-life experiences

Winnipeg railway underpass, 2008. Photo By Ken Yule. The North American Basic Income Group held its 15th annual congress in Winnipeg on May 13 to 16. The event brought together activists, researchers and people with experience of poverty from across North America and beyond to discuss an idea that is gaining momentum as a tool ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – George Monbiot observes that while few people would want to drive animals to extinction directly, we’re all too often eager to settle for a consumerist culture which produces exactly that result. – Carol Linnitt reports on the Trudeau Libs’ appointment of an oil industry cheerleader to review the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – David Dayen and Ryan Grim write that “free trade” agreements are in fact turning into little more than cash cows for hedge funds and other big-money speculators: Under this system, a corporation invested in a foreign country can appeal to arbitration panels, consisting of three corporate lawyers, if that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Don Pittis writes that it will take far more than words and sentiments to reverse the trend of growing income inequality. Elaine Power points out that Ontario’s social assistance programs – like those elsewhere – far fall short of meeting basic human needs. And Christopher Mackie reminds us ...

Canadian Dimension: 150 Million Indian Workers Take Part In Largest Strike in Centuries

Photo by Ranjith On Friday, an estimated 150 million workers refused to show up for work in India and instead took to the streets to demonstrate against labor conditions. *** UNIDENTIFIED: We are demanding that ordinary workers should also get a rock-bottom of 18,000 a piece minimum pay, take-home pay, so that they can have ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the connection between unionization and secure employment income – and the importance of encouraging the former if people otherwise face no real hope of achieving the latter. For further reading…– Again, Jake Rosenfeld, Patrick Denice and Jennifer Laird’s Economic Policy Institute study showing how unionization boosts non-union pay is here.– The Canadian Payroll ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Naomi Klein writes about the racism and dehumanization behind climate change denialism and inaction. And George Monbiot reminds us of the dangers of overheating oceans, while Michael Wines interviews Todd Halihan about the earthquakes and other harms caused by fracking. – Meanwhile, Chris Wood and Michael Beer ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Alan Freeman is duly appalled by Apple’s attempt to throw itself a pity party with the money it’s hoarding rather than paying in fair corporate taxes. And James Mackintosh reports on Jeroen Dijsselbloem’s response to Apple’s utterly tone-deaf position that it’s entitled to its entitlements, while the Globe ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Erin Seatter interviews Adam Lynes-Ford about Brian Day’s latest attack on universal Medicare. And Ricochet’s editorial board highlights how Day is ultimately fighting only to exacerbate inequality: Discrimination against racialized and Indigenous patients fosters health disparities across our country and sometimes leads to death. Poverty hurts Indigenous ...

Canadian Dimension: Labour Day: Signs of Renewal?

Photo by Fibonacci Blue Labour Day Weekend is upon us, and many union activists and their families will be out marching and picnicking, joining with brothers and sisters from other unions in a show of solidarity. While their participation is heartfelt there is no doubt many of them are asking what is there to celebrate? ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Labour Day reading. – Jared Bernstein comments on the prospect of a labour revival which can boost the prospects of unionized and non-unionized workers alike. And Thomas Walkom makes the case for closer identification between the NDP and Canada’s labour movement: Labour needs a political party because unions, on their own, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Saqib Bhatti and Stephen Lerner point out that the struggle for power between labour and capital is far from over, and that the next step may be to engage on wider questions of economic control: For too long most unions defined their mission narrowly as winning higher ...

wmtc: happy labour day

How have labour unions benefitted our society? Union activism brought us:Weekends! Literally. There used to be an expression: “Don’t come to work on Sunday, don’t come to work on Monday.” Meaning, if you took one day off, you were fired. Vacations – any vacationPaid vacationsThe 8-hour work dayAn end to child labour, so every child ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Brendan Duke examines the connection between wage growth and worker productivity, and makes the case that the former may lead to the latter: The 1929–1950 increase in wages was at first a result of several policies that directly raised workers’ wages, including the first federal minimum wage, the ...

wmtc: labour day readers’ advisory: books and movies that celebrate labour

I spoke to a customer yesterday who was visiting from Denmark. He described himself as a trade-unionist, and he came to the library, looking for me, to learn about our strike! He also said he had read a book he loved, and was looking for more like it. He described the book: “by a Canadian ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jim Hightower argues that there’s no reason the U.S. can’t develop an economic model which leads to shared prosperity – and the ideas are no less relevant in Canada: Take On Wall Street is both the name and the feisty attitude of a nationwide campaign that a coalition ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jim Hightower argues that there’s no reason the U.S. can’t develop an economic model which leads to shared prosperity – and the ideas are no less relevant in Canada: Take On Wall Street is both the name and the feisty attitude of a nationwide campaign that a coalition ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Chris Hamby starts off what looks to be a must-read investigation on the effect of ISDS rules by discussing how they’re used to prevent governments from punishing corporate wrongdoing: (A)n 18-month BuzzFeed News investigation, spanning three continents and involving more than 200 interviews and tens of thousands ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Chris Hamby starts off what looks to be a must-read investigation on the effect of ISDS rules by discussing how they’re used to prevent governments from punishing corporate wrongdoing: (A)n 18-month BuzzFeed News investigation, spanning three continents and involving more than 200 interviews and tens of thousands ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Sara Mojtehedzadeh reports on a new Ontario study recommending a strong investment in child care to reduce the gender wage gap. – Allan Moscovitch, Nick Falvo and David Macdonald offer a useful primer on social supports for seniors in Canada. And Marybeth Shinn, Scott Brown, Michelle Wood and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Sara Mojtehedzadeh reports on a new Ontario study recommending a strong investment in child care to reduce the gender wage gap. – Allan Moscovitch, Nick Falvo and David Macdonald offer a useful primer on social supports for seniors in Canada. And Marybeth Shinn, Scott Brown, Michelle Wood and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones discusses the UK’s experience with privatized rail as yet another example of how vital services become more costly and worse-run when put in corporate hands. – Sean McElwee highlights still more research showing that right-wing government tends to fail even on its own terms, with ...