Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Jordan Brennan and Kaylie Tiessen write that it’s long past time to set a level of federal revenue sufficient to support the social programs Canadians want: In the decades since [corporate-driven] reforms were undertaken, Canada experienced a significant deterioration in its macroeconomic performance: business investment has worsened and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Daniel Munro highlights how Uber and other service apps manipulate their workers. And The New York Times’ editorial board warns about the false promises of the gig economy: In reality, there is no utopia at companies like Uber, Lyft, Instacart and Handy, whose workers are often manipulated ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2017 Links

The latest from the federal NDP’s leadership campaign… – Marie-Danielle Smith reports that Jagmeet Singh is laying the groundwork to join the race. And Steve Paikin offers his take as to what that might mean for the current candidates – while also raising the (seemingly unlikely) prospect that Thomas Mulcair might join the fray. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Ethan Cox reports on new polling showing that Canadians are highly concerned about inequality – even if our governments aren’t doing anywhere meaningful to address it: Of Canadians surveyed, 73 per cent said their and their family’s economic situation had stayed the same or gotten worse over the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – In advance of this year’s Progress Summit, Ed Broadbent writes that burgeoning inequality threatens our democracy: Inequality matters. Promises must be kept. It’s not enough for our government to celebrate the diversity of our country but not enact policies that head off growing inequality. Mr. Trudeau, it’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Owen Jones writes that excessive reliance on corporate profiteers is the reason why the UK’s trains don’t run on time. And Nora Loreto argues that postal banking is needed (among other reasons) to rein in abuses by Canada’s biggest banks. – Shannon Daub examines what British Columbia’s voters ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Mark Holmgren writes that there’s no reason why we should allow poverty to continue in a country which has plenty of wealth to reduce it, while Patrick Butler notes that the conservative view of poverty as being solely the result of personal (lack of) merit is oblivious ...

Things Are Good: A Living Wage Makes for a Good Business Plan

Helmi Ansari started a successful business and understands what’s it like to worry about paying the bills – and knows that when you’re stressed about paying bills you’re not focussed at the job at hand. This is why he pays all of his employees a living wage. A living wage is usually higher than minimum ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Ed Finn reminds us how the economy as a whole – including the private sector – suffers when austerity is inflicted on public services: The public and private sectors have become so interdependent that one cannot be attacked or diminished without hurting the other. Public expenditures often stimulate ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Andrew Jackson writes about the opportunities missed when governments restrict their economic policy to propping up the corporate sector, rather than seeking to innovate directly in the public interest: The received wisdom among economists used to be that governments should just set broad “framework” policies such as ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Rutger Bregman writes that the most extreme wealth in our economy is based on rents rather than productivity: In reality, it is the waste collectors, the nurses, and the cleaners whose shoulders are supporting the apex of the pyramid. They are the true mechanism of social solidarity. Meanwhile, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Julia Smith argues that one of the primary responses to the recent reports about banks exploiting consumers (and pressuring staff to carry out their plans) should be a drive to organize workers: Banking is often viewed as an industry offering secure white-collar jobs with good wages. In ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jordon Cooper writes that the Saskatchewan Party’s slash-and-burn budget confirms that for them, the poor don’t matter. CBC reports on the devastating effect the budget will have on municipalities, while Courtney Markewitch reports that Saskatoon’s city council is fighting back. And Joel Senick notes that the planned shutdown ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – David Olive offers his take on what a basic income should look like – and is optimistic that Ontario’s ongoing experiment should hit the mark: A UBI would be pointless in the absence of existing supports. In the Ontario pilot projects, the payout for a single person ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – Brian Jones rightly argues that a fair tax system would go a long way toward eliminating any serious concerns about government deficits. And Marco Chown Oved offers some reason for optimism in the Canada Revenue Agency’s response to the Panama Papers. – David Macdonald examines what could have ...

Canadian Dimension: Fighting for union justice on the streets

Richard Dalkeith (L) and Mike Vanveen work on renovations at the SLOW office, November 2016. Photo: Dan Janisse/ Windsor Star. In Windsor, Ontario, when the Downtown Windsor Business Improvement Association paid to install iron-spiked railings where panhandlers sit, the organization which called attention to it was the Street Labourers of Windsor (SLOW). They also took ...

Canadian Dimension: What we need is a working-class politics

Photo by Daniel Perianu Reflecting on the state of our movement, we should be asking: Is the labour movement better positioned today to influence and affect meaningful change than under Harper? Are the prospects for workers in this country better than they were over the past 10 years? There is no doubt that, after a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Vicki Nash challenges the claim that unemployment in a precarious economy is generally a matter of choice rather than the absence thereof. And Jia Tolentino argues that we shouldn’t pretend there’s any value in being forced to work oneself to death: It does require a fairly dystopian strain ...

wmtc: ontario librarians: should the ola support staffless libraries?

This week, the Toronto Public Library announced plans to open libraries with no staff. Not just no librarians — we’ve seen that in many places — but no staff whatsoever. This was bad enough, but we were further horrified to see that the Ontario Library Association, a membership-based organization that is supposed to further the interests ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – In the wake of a thoroughly disappointing budget day at both the provincial and federal levels, it’s worth taking note of Ivan Sigal’s view on the importance of building trust – rather than limiting citizens to either fake news or fake policies: How do we begin to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Katie Allen reports on the growing gap between the privileged few and the working class in the UK. And Frank Elgar highlights how we all pay the price of inequality, even as our governments can’t be bothered to rein it in: For decades, the IMF, OECD, and World ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Josh Bivens explains why increased fairness would likely lead to improved overall growth for the U.S.’ economy: (O)ne key driver of slow productivity growth in recent years can be fixed: the remaining shortfall between aggregate demand and the economy’s productive potential. Running the economy far below potential for ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Heather Whiteside discusses how the privatization schemes being toyed with at all levels of government represent nothing more than reckless gambling with public money and goods: When a federal, provincial, or municipal government builds a bridge, a highway, a school, or a hospital, we know who owns ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Linda McQuaig discusses the need to fight fake news about Canada’s health care system (and the corporate raiders trying to amplify it): (I)t was with some pleasure last week that I watched as a Republican congressman tried to insist that Canadians routinely flock to the U.S. for health ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the Saskatchewan Party’s determination to make work more precarious – and pay and benefits harder to come by – in the public and private sectors alike. For further reading…– The history of the Skip the Dishes saga includes the government’s plan for millions of dollars in handouts; the decision of the company not ...