Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Sixth Estate examines which party’s candidates have violated the Canada Elections Act in recent elections. And it shouldn’t be much surprise that Canada’s supposed law-and-order party doesn’t have much respect for either when it comes to its own campaigns: In addition to the in-and-out fraud cases against ...

Accidental Deliberations: On correlations

This summer has seen plenty of crowing from the right over a connection between “economic freedom” (as defined by various corporate think tanks) and GDP levels. But for those of us who see obvious problems with treating GDP as the sole measure of a society’s accomplishment, that raises an obvious follow-up question: how do the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Jay Bryan weighs in on dangers of increasing inequality and corporate greed: Of course, the corporate mantra is that top executives are making millions because they’re possessed of a unique genius that enriches their companies, and thereby all of society. But are they really 10 or 20 times ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your review. – Iglika Ivanova calculates the cost of poverty in British Columbia: My findings confirm what we’ve already suspected: poverty comes with a very high price tag. The cost of poverty to government alone is estimated to be between $2.2 to $2.3 billion per year. The costs to society as whole ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Armine Yalnizyan follows up on the Conference Board of Canada’s recognition that growing inequality is a serious problem for Canada by noting the similar observations around the globe: There is a growing awareness that when the fruits of prosperity are so poorly shared, trouble is not far ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: When Business and Progressives Agree

It was news, not so much because of what was said, as who said it:  The Conference Board of Canada released a report on rising inequality in Canada today, noting that despite the fact that Canadians are better off than a generation ago, the richest 20% in society are taking an ever-growing share of the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your day. – Charlie Angus is leading the charge against the Cons’ plan to ram through lawful access legislation, labeling it as warrantless snooping and spying on Canadians. We’ll have to see how far Angus can get in swaying public opinion, but a concerted effort over the summer could go a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Janyce McGregor’s article on the perils of Senate reform is well worth a read in general. But let’s particularly highlight an issue I’ve raised before – if one which is no less glaring in the absence of any reform: So why not just abolish the Senate? Indeed, that’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: On class dynamics

Doug Saunders’ post on the political role of the middle class is certainly worth a read. But I’d think the core theory demands some significant tweaking in figuring out how politics have actually tended to operate: Andy Sumner, a scholar with Britain’s Institute for Development Studies who is working this year at the Washington-based Center ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Kai Nagata’s post on why he quit his job as a reporter is well worth a read in full. But let’s particularly note his observations which may apply just as much to many other jobs as to positions in the media (even if the restrictions on public ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – I’ll join the seemingly long list of commentators who wouldn’t ever have expected to cite David Brooks, but can’t avoid it based on his latest column: Eldar Shafir of Princeton and Sendhil Mullainathan of Harvard have recently, with federal help, been exploring a third theory, that scarcity produces ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – David Green nicely explains the basic choice to be made in determining what type of economy we want to pursue: (T)he basic tenet of the new policy regime – that any increase in wage costs kills jobs and growth – means that the regime cannot deliver good jobs ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Ian Welsh serves up some tough commentary as to whether Canadian voters saddled with unrepresentative and downright destructive governments are merely getting what we deserve: (W)e have selected, to rule our societies, sociopaths at best and psychopaths at worse. They have contempt for those they rule, do ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Canada Day reading. – Oh, how nice it would be to be able to take pride in Dan Gardner’s message about Canada’s true identity: The level of civility seen every day at fourway stops across Canada is unheard of in countries around the world. That doesn’t mean Canadians are, individually, better ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: BC’s Regressive Tax Shift

With much of the talk on taxes in BC about the HST, we issued a new report today that looks at the bigger context for BC’s tax system (Vancouver Sun oped here, CTV News story here). Iglika Ivanova, Seth Klein and I compare and contrast BC’s tax system after a decade where tax cuts were ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that (with a B.C. flavour) for your Tuesday reading. – Yes, the CCPA’s report showing that taxes in British Columbia are downright regressive is stunning enough on its face. But the real story may lie in the response of the province’s finance minister: Finance Minister Kevin Falcon said he didn’t put much stock ...

Accidental Deliberations: On downturns

Sure, it might seem like reason for concern that it’s only the type of government spending which the Cons are determined to slash that allowed Canadians in general to somewhat avoid a significant economic collapse over the past few years: In 2009, average earnings fell from $39,100 to $38,500 due to the steep rise of ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Unions and Inequality

  An important paper by Bruce Western and Jake Rosenfeld which is forthcoming in the American Journal of Sociology finds that the decline in private sector union density in the US  (from 34% to 8% for men, and from 16% to 6% for women) explains one fifth to one third of the increase in inequality ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Adam Radwanski points out how Stephen Harper’s continuing Senate embarrassment figures to play into the NDP’s hands: If Mr. Harper was looking to signal once and for all that he’s abandoned his populist roots, he could scarcely have done better than Wednesday’s Senate appointments. Little more than two ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.- Crawford Kilian interviews Linda McQuaig on inequality, including this comment on how to handle the damaging effects of inequality politically: On whether inequality is becoming a serious political issue:”Eventually it will be, especially if we continue on our present trajectory of the next few years. But what kind of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament In Review: June 13, 2011

As I’d suspected, there looks to be plenty of material for a review post from just a day’s worth of events in the House of Commons. So here’s an inaugural daily review of what you may have missed in Ottawa yesterday – with a few themes I’ll be developing in future posts.The Big IdeaWhile it ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.- Rhys Kesselman rightly points out how the populist message that propelled the Cons to power has given way to elitist policy-making: Once the federal budget is balanced, the Conservatives plan to double the TFSA’s annual allowance to $10,000 and to permit income splitting for couples with children under 18. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

A variety of content for your weekend reading.- The Lethbridge Herald nicely points out who figures to have a problem with Stephen Harper’s decision to have the Canadian public pay tens of thousands of dollars to send him to Game 4 of the Stanley Cup Finals: (P)erhaps the flap over Harper’s appearance at the game ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – In case we didn’t already have enough examples of the Wall government’s contempt for voting, James Wood notes that it’s dragging its heels on authorizing any enumeration before the official writ period. That figures to work wonders in making it more difficult to accurately identify voters – ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Canada Doesn’t Deserve the Silver

It has been widely reported in the Globe and elsewhere that Canada ranks #2 in the just-released OECD Better Life Index, outstripped only by Australia. I am all for measures of objective and subjective social well-being that go beyond GDP as a measure of progress, and this OECD report offers up some useful information. But ...