Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Larry Elliott interviews Joseph Stiglitz about the rise of Donald Trump and other demagogues in the wake of public anger over inequality and economic unfairness. And Stiglitz also joins a group of economists calling for an end to austerity in the UK. – Phillip Mendonca-Vieira highlights how rent ...

Things Are Good: Take a Moment and Really Think about Unions

2017 has been anything but a successful year for unions. For a multitude of reasons unions have a bad reputation, although it’s thanks to unions that we have labour rights and weekends. Unions are really good at helping individuals deal with institutions that want to exploit their work; and history has proven this time and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – George Monbiot writes that the erosion of government for the public good stands to lead to an authoritarian state: All that remain as widely shared, commonly accepted sources of national pride are our public services: the NHS, the BBC, the education system, social security, our great libraries and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Peter Goodman examines how a basic income could relieve against some of the most harmful effects of capitalist economics. And Sarah O’Connor discusses the plight of towns which have been left behind by economic change. – Meanwhile, Matt Bruenig offers a reminder that most extreme high incomes are ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the Trudeau Libs’ willingness to favour the concentration of money, power and privilege. For further reading…– Peter Zimonjic reported on the fallout from Bill Morneau’s profit off of his own decisions as Finance Minister, while Kathleen Harris discussed his belated attempt to distance himself from his own choices. And in the example of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Rupert Neate reports on a new Credit Suisse study showing that the 1% owns half of the world’s wealth. And Heather Long notes that hundreds of U.S. millionaires are pushing not to have their taxes cut when it will only serve to exacerbate inequality. – Mark Townsend ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Steve Burgess points out that we shouldn’t be the least bit surprise by the latest news of politically-connected billionaires managing to tilt the tax system in their favour. Ed Broadbent calls for a much-needed end to tax policy that favours the wealthy in efforts to avoid contributing to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Gabriel Zucman discusses how the wealthy currently avoid paying their fair share of taxes – and how to stop them by properly attributing income and ensuring registers of wealth. And Micah White is optimistic that the public response to the Paradise Papers may be to develop lasting ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Thomas Frank asks how we’ve allowed billionaires to escape any responsibility for the maintenance of civilization by moving their wealth offshore: I know that what the billionaires and the celebrities have done is legal. They merely took advantage of the system. It’s the system itself, and the way ...

The Disaffected Lib: It May Be Legal, Barely, But It’s Not Victimless. You Oughta Know.

Rich folks see themselves as victims. It’s just not fair that they should have to cough up a sizeable chunk of their hard-earned cash to the government. That’s why so many stash that cash in tax havens, all within the letter of some very accommodating laws. Not many little people get to shelter their equally ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Wanda Wyporska writes that increasing inequality is the main factor behind public distrust and discontent with our politics: Rising inequality is not inevitable, it is largely a result of the political and economic decisions taken by governments. This is clear from the varying levels of inequality in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – The Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy studies the large-scale use of offshore tax avoidance in the corporate sector, just in time for the Paradise Papers to reveal another set of tax avoidance loopholes being kept open for the benefit of Justin Trudeau’s insiders. And Matthew Klein proposes ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – Tom Parkin writes that the Trudeau Libs have proven themselves to be far more interested in protecting Bill Morneau and his wealthy friends than the Canadian public. And Christo Aivalis discusses Jagmeet Singh’s opportunity to own the issue of tax fairness: This is Singh’s opportunity to make a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Jonathan Ostry comments on the emerging recognition that inequality represents a barrier to economic development: I argue that greater attention should be paid to the consequences that economic policies have for income distribution (inequality). The reasons are four-fold. First, excessive levels of inequality are bad not only ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Dennis Howlett highlights how the Libs are only making our tax system even less fair by overreacting to trumped-up criticism of a plan to close minor loopholes: As​ ​the​ ​dust​ ​settles​ ​on​ ​the​ Trudeau government’s private​ ​ corporation​ tax​ ​reforms,​ ​Canada​ ​seem​s ​to​ ​be​ falling ​ further​ ​behind​ ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Rupert Neate reports on a new study showing that the world’s 1,500-odd billionaires between them control over $6 trillion in wealth. – Stuart Trew sets out Canada’s choice between corporate-oriented trade deals such as the CETA, or sustainable and fairly-distributed economic development. And Laurie Monsebraaten writes about the ...

The Disaffected Lib: What Worries Billionaires? You and Me, Us.

Not since the time of the Carnegies, Rockefellers and Vanderbilts  at the turn of the 20th century was so much owned by so few  I’m pretty sure I’ve never spent time with a billionaire.  I’ve never had the chance to hear them out, what makes them tick, what troubles them, their deepest worries. It can’t ...

The Disaffected Lib: Toasted, Roasted and Grilled. – Lagarde

IMF chief Christine Legard has added her voice to the call for urgent action on climate change – and growing inequality. “As I’ve said before, if we don’t do anything about climate change now, in 50 years’ time we will be toasted, roasted and grilled.” Both climate change and inequality were “two key issues” that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Mark Karlin interviews George Monbiot about the prospect of politics based on empathy, sharing and belonging. – Andrew Jackson and Kate McInturff each offer their take on the federal fiscal update – with both lamenting the Libs’ lack of ambition. – Karl Nerenberg highlights how the federal ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Hugh Mackenzie writes that the biggest problem with the Libs’ closing tax loopholes for private corporations was the failure to push for far more tax fairness: Any tax reform that isn’t just a give away creates winners and losers. If the goal is to make the tax system ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Richard Hill wonders whether neoliberalism is approaching its end, while noting the dangers of allowing progressive themes to be used to prop up elitist power structures. And Heather Boushey interviews Kimberly Clausing about the opportunity to raise revenue and reduce inequality by properly taxing corporations, while Marshall ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Jeremy Nuttall interviews Nelson Wiseman about the Libs’ attempts to spin their way out of a trumped-up tax controversy – and how they’re making matters worse in the process. And Murray Dobbin points out that there’s a long way to go in making sure the wealthy pay their ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Edward Harrison comments on the business-backed push to rebrand corporate control and crony capitalism as freedom. And Ryan Cooper points out that the concept of deregulation ultimately serves only to concentrate power in the hands of the wealthy few: Government regulations can be good or bad. But for ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Peter Whoriskey examines how inequality is becoming increasingly pronounced among U.S. seniors. And Kate Pickett and Richard Wilkinson discuss how inequality contributes to entrenching social divisions: The toll which inequality exacts from the vast majority of society is one of the most important limitations on the quality of life – particularly ...

Things Are Good: Using Math to Solve for Inequality

Inequality has been increasing globally for years, and developed nations have seen inequality rise in rates comparable to the start of the great depression. This situation is understandably problematic and worrisome. Accordingly, a lot of thinkers have looked into the problem, most solutions come down to some level of redistribution of wealth. The New England ...