Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading. – It’s bad enough that what’s passing for climate change discussion is an agreement to keep meeting for years on end that doesn’t really advance matters any from the early ’90s. – But lest there be any doubt, the Cons aren’t quite happy enough with the results of their ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Jeffrey Simpson compliments the NDP’s leadership contenders for dealing with the issue of inequality, but rightly notes there’s a long way left to go: Good for the NDP leadership candidates for talking about income inequality in Canada. At their first leadership debate last weekend, and on their websites, ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Mind the OECD Credibility Gap

Further to Toby’s post, the OECD report on inequality is well worth a careful read. It bolsters, through careful empirical and cross country analysis, two key arguments long advanced by the labour movement and progressive economists: –  key trends in the labour market – widening wage disparity between top earners and the rest, and the ...

Molly'sBlog: Molly’sBlog 2011-12-06 00:25:00

CANADIAN POLITICS: THE RICH GET RICHER: Oh my, is this “news” ? During good times the rich pull ahead as they manage to grab the fruits of expansion. In bad times guess what ? They keep pulling ahead. Good or bad they will get their paws into the till. Here’s an interesting item about the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your day. – Toby Sanger posts about the OECD’s findings on inequality in Canada, with this particularly jumping out as to how much less progressive our tax system is now than it was two decades ago: Taxes and benefits play a smaller role in reducing inequality in Canada than in most ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: OECD on Inequality

Following concern expressed by the IMF, the Conference Board and of course thousands of protesters around the world, the OECD has just released an extensive 400 page report on the problem of growing inequality: Divided We Stand: Why Inequality Keeps on Rising. I haven’t read through it yet, and it also has quite a lot ...

Molly'sBlog: Molly’sBlog 2011-12-03 11:59:00

LOCAL EVENTS WINNIPEG: FORUM ON ECONOMIC INEQUALITY AND BUSINESS:****************************** –WhenThursday, December 8, 2011Time5:00pm until 8:00pmWhereJames W. Burns Executive Education Centre , 177 Lombard Ave (2nd floor), Winnipeg, ManitobaDescriptionhttp://myuminfo.umanitoba.ca/index.asp?sec=712&too=200&eve=8&dat=12%2F8%2F2011&epa=52596Reception:Refreshments and hors d’oeuvres will be served.What Does “Occupy” Mean to Business and How Should Businesses Respond?The I.H. Asper School of Business is pleased to invite you to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your midweek reading. – Rachel Mendleson reports on research showing that inequality is correlated to mortality rates within a particular city – with the sole exception of communities with a high proportion of immigrants. Which makes it awfully tempting to suggest that based on their combination of inequality-exacerbating and immigration-limiting policies, the ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: The New Politics Initiative: Ten Years After

Rabble.ca is running a series of reflections on the tenth anniversary of the New Politics Initiative, which sought to create a more democratic politics in Canada ideally as part of a revitalized NDP. The vision statement is here; my piece follows, and there are also contributions from Judy Rebick and Jim Stanford. Altogether these make for a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

Assorted content for your evening reading. – Mitchell Anderson wonders whether weeding out corporate psychopathy might be the key to a more equal and sustainable economy. – But judging from the crumbs being tossed at Ontario’s poor (in the wake of gigantic corporate tax cuts), the problem looks to extend somewhat beyond corporations alone. And ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Frances Russell wonders what happened to the concept of the public good: Our political language about taxes has changed. Gone is “ability to pay.” The new catchphrases are “user pay” and “pay as you go.” The bottom-line message to citizens is “if you can’t pay, you don’t ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Unequal = Indebted

The IMF find that rising inequality is a key driving force behind balance of payments problems and domestic instability in developed countries. “what unites the experiences of the main deficit countries is a steep increase in income inequality over recent decades, as measured by the share of income going to the richest 5 percent of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Linda McQuaig points out how the Occupy movement has at least started to shift the terms of our political debate: Rather than hanging out at malls or zoning out on Facebook, these young people have endured real hardship in the Canadian near-winter to fight for a more ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading. – Thomas Walkom rightly points out that the voters most affected by the Cons’ push for privatized pensions are the ones paying the least attention to the issue: For workers over 50, the pension reforms introduced by Canada’s Conservative government on Thursday mean virtually nothing. Such workers have relatively ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Marc Lee presents an alternative economic vision to the capital-first-and-only approach that currently serves as conventional wisdom. – Meanwhile, Andrew Jackson suggests five philosophical principles that can help the NDP to form government in 2015 on a social democratic platform: More – not less – public investment is ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your afternoon reading. – pogge rightly questions the Cons’ continued efforts to have decisions made by ministerial fiat rather than through public debate. – Glen McGregor eviscerates Brian Lilley’s thoroughly inaccurate attack on Canada’s Chief Electoral Officer Marc Mayrand. – Murray Mandryk suggests that Saskatchewan’s New Democratic Party needs to remove the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Charlie Angus’ concerns about the Cons’ Albany Club schmoozing nicely parallel my take on the entire lobbying apparatus they’ve built up: Mr. Angus said the Albany Club reception is an example of the kind of informal lobbying, through cozy relationships, that has grown under Mr. Harper’s watch. “My ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Who Occupies the Sky?

CCPA released a new report today by myself and Amanda Card that makes the links between inequality and carbon footprints. We look at the distribution of greenhouse gas emissions for Canada, building on an analysis of BC emissions. While it was not planned this way, the analysis is timely given the Occupy movement’s focus on ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to end your weekend. – Jeffrey Sachs muses that the Occupy movement may just be the beginning of a sea change in American politics: Both parties have joined in crippling the government in response to the demands of their wealthy campaign contributors, who above all else insist on keeping low tax rates on ...

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament In Review: October 21, 2011

Friday, October 21 saw another day of debate focused largely on the Cons’ anti-consumer copyright legislation. The Big IssueOnce again, copyright was the largest issue, with Tyrone Benskin summing up what’s wrong with the Cons’ bill in its current form: In its present form, Bill C-11 is an unequivocal failure. It outright fails to satisfy ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

This and that for your evening reading. – Erin offers up his suggestions for the Saskatchewan NDP’s renewal process: The next NDP leader will presumably be met with a barrage of negative advertising from the Sask Party. New Democrats would do well to elect a leader who will be less vulnerable than Lingenfelter to such ...

The Disaffected Lib: Is America Finally Coming to Its Senses?

According to Salon’s David Sirota, America is coming to its senses.  He attributes it to a recent awareness of just two things – his country’s burgeoning wealth gap and its collapsing social mobility. When even the most local of television journalists are compelled to acknowledge this crushing emergency in a country whose media aggressively promotes American ...

Returns to education: from a sure thing to a trip to vegas

Paul Krugman has pointed out, here and here that the meme that most of the inequality we have been experiencing of late has much to do with differences in educational attainment is bogus.  Mankiw responds in typical fashion by changing … Continue reading →

Canadian Progressive World: Occupy Ottawa Pays Tribute to Late Vancouver Occupier Ashlie Gough

(Originally Published on Occupy Ottawa website) The Occupy Ottawa Movement observed a moment of silence before its General Assembly last night to commemorate the death of Vancouver Occupier, Ashlie Gough. The 23-year-old Victoria native died …Read More

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Rick Salutin nicely describes what’s behind the “charity” model of top-end wish fulfillment that the Cons are pitching in place of actual social programs: The Old Philanthropy, aside from a few big foundations that now look modest, was embodied in wealthy people who went on boards like the ...