Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – Janice Kennedy highlights the consequences of turning back the clock 80 years when it comes to collective bargaining rights: In the world of Stephen Harper and Co., big business rules. Period. The concept of workers’ rights, especially unionized workers’ rights, is a nuisance to be swatted away. The ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Canada Day reading. – Oh, how nice it would be to be able to take pride in Dan Gardner’s message about Canada’s true identity: The level of civility seen every day at fourway stops across Canada is unheard of in countries around the world. That doesn’t mean Canadians are, individually, better ...

Accidental Deliberations: On political investments

Yes, there’s plenty of reason for snark in response to the news that the Saskatchewan Chamber of Commerce will be (a) pouring hundreds of thousands of dollars into this fall’s provincial election campaign, and (b) pretending not to be doing so on behalf of the Saskatchewan Party. But let’s focus instead on a couple of ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, expanding on the hostile labour environment that’s developing as federal and provincial governments alike use back-to-work legislation as a pre-emptive attack on workers. For further reading (which should be familiar to those who read the blog regularly): – Ryan McGreal’s “revenge egalitarianism” concept earns a mention in the column, and for those who haven’t ...

Accidental Deliberations: On selloffs

Sure, it takes some effort to pull a sweetheart deal out of the wreckage of AECL. But we probably shouldn’t be surprised that the Cons seem to have pulled off the feat: Versant Partners analyst Neil Linsdell told CBC News there’s still a market for the existing reliable Candu technology in the developing world. “SNC ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Yes, plenty of attention is being paid to Canada’s weak ranking when it comes to innovation. But it’s well worth noting that the failure isn’t for lack of billions of dollars being tossed down a sinkhole due to the Cons’ distaste for active and effective government: Other countries ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – Following up on yesterday’s post, the Hill Times reports that even the first set of cuts from the Harper Cons’ majority looks to have a serious effect on our federal government’s ability to function for itself rather than relying on self-interested corporations to make decisions: The 46 axed ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Paul Wells is pleased to have received some response about how the Cons claim to be saving money. But it’s worth taking a close look at the substance of that response, and particularly highlighting that one of the few general explanations actually looks to signal a plan ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Adam Radwanski points out how Stephen Harper’s continuing Senate embarrassment figures to play into the NDP’s hands: If Mr. Harper was looking to signal once and for all that he’s abandoned his populist roots, he could scarcely have done better than Wednesday’s Senate appointments. Little more than two ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, with my first commentary on a subject which I’ll plan to discuss plenty more in the future: the need to protect our freedoms of speech, conscience and assembly from private as well as public intrusions.

Writings of J. Todd Ring: Built to crash: the coming economic tsunami

`Would you rather have a perfectly efficient system that, if hit by a pebble, would shatter? Or, would you rather have an adaptable system that may not give you the exact output you want, but can handle anything?  According to Barry Lynn of the New America Foundation, our economy and our entire domestic food supply ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Blogging may be on hold for the week, but columnizing isn’t. Here’s my latest, on the Cons’ disaster response and the broader question of what we expect from our elected leaders in a time of crisis.

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – In case we didn’t already have enough examples of the Wall government’s contempt for voting, James Wood notes that it’s dragging its heels on authorizing any enumeration before the official writ period. That figures to work wonders in making it more difficult to accurately identify voters – ...

Accidental Deliberations: On credibility gaps

Since I haven’t yet seen this story linked to the spin which seems to have made it necessary, let’s put two and two together. The professionals responsible for maintaining the solvency of the Canada Pension Plan have made it clear that the CPP is capable of expanding its operations if Canadians decide they’d prefer to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – The McGill Institute’s Election Content Analysis includes plenty of interesting information on how this month’s federal election was covered. But the most noteworthy point looks to be the lag time between developments in the public and coverage by the media: the key developments in the polls for the ...

Writings of J. Todd Ring: The system is broken: strategic voting, coalitions, and the political regime under which we live

While I can of course see the rationale for strategic voting, there is much to be said for voting with one’s conscience. When we consistently choose the lesser of two evils, our choices are reduced to evil, and the results are evil. When everyone holds their nose and votes, essentially, for one of the parties ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – thwap is among a few bloggers to rightly slam the Cons’ obscene message to flooded Quebeckers that the only way they can hope for help is if somebody stands to profit from it: Toews (is) justifying removing Canadian Forces from helping with the clean-up after a Quebec flood, ...