Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – Brian Jones rightly argues that a fair tax system would go a long way toward eliminating any serious concerns about government deficits. And Marco Chown Oved offers some reason for optimism in the Canada Revenue Agency’s response to the Panama Papers. – David Macdonald examines what could have ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – In the wake of a thoroughly disappointing budget day at both the provincial and federal levels, it’s worth taking note of Ivan Sigal’s view on the importance of building trust – rather than limiting citizens to either fake news or fake policies: How do we begin to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Jo Littler writes about the illusion of meritocracy, and how it has contributed to the unconscionable spread of inequality: Over the past few decades, neoliberal meritocracy has been characterised by two key features. First, the sheer scale of its attempt to extend entrepreneurial competition into the nooks ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Heather Whiteside discusses how the privatization schemes being toyed with at all levels of government represent nothing more than reckless gambling with public money and goods: When a federal, provincial, or municipal government builds a bridge, a highway, a school, or a hospital, we know who owns ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Robert Reich comments on the absurdity of Donald Trump’s plan to shovel yet more money toward a military-industrial complex and corporate profiteers who already have more than they know what to do with. – Sara Fraser and Laura Chapin write that food insecurity is primarily an issue of ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the Saskatchewan Party’s determination to make work more precarious – and pay and benefits harder to come by – in the public and private sectors alike. For further reading…– The history of the Skip the Dishes saga includes the government’s plan for millions of dollars in handouts; the decision of the company not ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Wanda Wyporska writes that growing inequality is primarily the result of political choices: If it seems ridiculous that 1,000 people work harder or offer more value than 40 per cent of the population, that’s because it is. This level of inequality isn’t natural or desirable, it’s not about ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Paul Wells notes that the Trudeau Libs are having trouble keeping their story straight in pretending to appeal to Canada’s middle class. And Brent Patterson writes that the renegotiation of NAFTA is just one more area where the Libs aren’t interested in hearing from anybody but big business. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Paul Wells notes that the Trudeau Libs are having trouble keeping their story straight in pretending to appeal to Canada’s middle class. And Brent Patterson writes that the renegotiation of NAFTA is just one more area where the Libs aren’t interested in hearing from anybody but big business. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading: – Percy Downe notes that both the Harper Cons and Trudeau Libs have stood in the way of identifying and recouping tens of billions of dollars in unpaid taxes – leaving everybody else to pay the share of tax evaders. And Riley Sparks discusses how secret settlements – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading: – Percy Downe notes that both the Harper Cons and Trudeau Libs have stood in the way of identifying and recouping tens of billions of dollars in unpaid taxes – leaving everybody else to pay the share of tax evaders. And Riley Sparks discusses how secret settlements – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Louis-Philippe Rochon chimes in on why Justin Trudeau’s faux populism is entirely beyond belief when compared to his actions while in power: Since coming to power, the prime minister has openly pursued policies that have only exacerbated the economic situation by raising corporate profits, and by contributing to the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Louis-Philippe Rochon chimes in on why Justin Trudeau’s faux populism is entirely beyond belief when compared to his actions while in power: Since coming to power, the prime minister has openly pursued policies that have only exacerbated the economic situation by raising corporate profits, and by contributing to the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Lawrence Mishel and Heidi Shierholz write that we shouldn’t let governments and businesses off the hook for regressive policy choices by blaming technology. And Ben Tarnoff points out that any effects on the distribution of income and wealth can be dealt with through a fair tax system. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Lawrence Mishel and Heidi Shierholz write that we shouldn’t let governments and businesses off the hook for regressive policy choices by blaming technology. And Ben Tarnoff points out that any effects on the distribution of income and wealth can be dealt with through a fair tax system. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Justin Trudeau is about the least plausible possible advocate as to the importance of building trust in leaders and public institutions. For further reading…– The text of Trudeau’s Hamburg speech is here. And both Paul Wells and Susan Delacourt wonder whether it signals a shift in the Libs’ plans, though the more ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Martin Lukacs argues that the way to avoid a Canadian Donald Trump is to ensure people have a progressive challenger to the corporate establishment: Trudeau’s social liberalism has been partnered with the very economic policies that have cemented inequality and savaged people’s quality of life—and which are now ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – David Suzuki discusses the merits of a four-day work week in improving both working and living conditions:  It’s absurd that so many people still work eight hours a day, five days a week — or more — with only a few weeks’ vacation a year, often needing ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Kate Pickett and Richard Wilkinson comment on the moral and practical harm done by continued inequality: Inequality matters because, as a robust and growing body of evidence shows, the populations of societies with bigger income differences tend to have poorer physical and mental health, more illicit drug use, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Simon Enoch explains why the Sask Party’s plans to inflict an austerian beating until economic morale improves is doomed to failure: It is now abundantly clear that the Saskatchewan government’s “transformational change” agenda is in reality a not-so-subtle euphemism for provincewide austerity in response to the current ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Louis-Philippe Rochon writes that while American voters had to know what they’d get in casting their most recent ballots, far too many Canadians may have believed the Libs’ promises of something else: On this side of the 49th parallel, however, when Canadians elected Trudeau a little over 15 ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Kevin Young, Tarun Banerjee and Michael Schwartz discuss how capital uses the exact tools it’s working to take away from labour – including the threat of strikes – to impose an anti-social agenda on the public: Capitalists routinely exert leverage over governments by withholding the resources — ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – George Monbiot examines how politics in the UK and the U.S. are dominated by unaccountable corporate money. And Stephen Maher and B.J. Siekierski report that both the Libs and Cons are fully on board – as Rona Ambrose managed to take (however justified) umbrage at Justin Trudeau’s vacation ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content for your Friday reading. – Aditya Chakrabortty writes about the devastating combination of an urgent need for collective action on the key issues we face, and a deeply-entrenched political aversion to anything of the sort. And Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett highlight how the UK Cons are going out of their way to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Andrew Coyne and Rob Mason each discuss Justin Trudeau’s broken promise of a fairer electoral system. Chantal Hebert observes that the commitment itself – however frequently and fervently repeated – looks to have been little more than a cheap campaign prop. And Karl Nerenberg highlights how the ...