Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Robert Jago comments on an all-white jury’s acquittal of Gerald Stanley for the shooting death of Colten Boushie. Shree Paradkar notes that the issue of non-representative juries is far from a new one. Scott Gilmore recognizes that Boushie’s death and its aftermath are just one more story ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Jim O’Neill proposes an end to corporate free-riding (and an assurance of contribution to the society which allows for profit) through explicit “pay-or-play” rules: Since proposing a pay-or-play scheme for the pharmaceutical industry, I have come to think that the same principle could be applied more broadly in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Evening Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Aditya Chakrabortty comments on the stunning turnaround experienced by the UK city of Preston after it started making a concerted effort to use public money to benefit citizens and local development. – Meanwhile, CNN Wires notes that in contrast, massize Amazon warehouses don’t do anything to add ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Victor Cyr discusses the problems with a public policy focus on capitalism without any concern for human well-being. And Ann Pettifor highlights the concentrated wealth and power arising out of corporate monopolies, while noting that political decisions are behind those realities. – Alan Freeman points out that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Thomas Kochan takes a look at what workers would want done with the cost of corporate tax cuts if they weren’t being silenced by the U.S.’ corporatist political system. And Steven Greenhouse points out a new set of protests and strikes intended to make sure that advocates for ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Joseph Stiglitz discusses the apparent destructive belief among Davos’ elites that irrational exuberance and top-heavy economic gains are remotely sustainable: The world is plagued by almost intractable problems. Inequality is surging, especially in the advanced economies. The digital revolution, despite its potential, also carries serious risks for privacy, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Matthew Sears writes that we would be much better off prioritizing more than just cutting short-term costs and prices in making choices: Are we really unwilling to pay more for our coffee as we are on our way to our well-paid and comfortable jobs (as mine certainly ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Ed Finn comments on the massive amounts of public money being funneled toward Canada’s wealthiest corporations: When it comes to listing countries on the basis of the social services they provide to citizens compared to the subsidies they heap on corporations, Canada doesn’t fare well. A study from ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Noam Scheiber and Ben Casselman comment on the role of corporate consolidation in undermining pay and working conditions. And Meagan Day rebuts the claim that employers can be excused for ignoring not-yet-qualified pools of workers by pointing out that the same people once treated as unqualified are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Elizabeth Kolbert comments on the psychology of inequality, and particularly how the current trend in which a disproportionate share of gains goes to a small number of wealthy individuals produces no ultimate winners:  As the relative-income model predicted, those who’d learned that they were earning less than their ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Jesse Winter is the latest reporter to tell the stories of a few minimum-wage workers who will see a raise as a result of improved employment standards. And Erika Shaker points out that a substantial minimum-wage increase is a long-overdue response to outdated statutory standards and stagnant ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Simon Ducatel writes about the unfairness of attacking people living in poverty rather than looking for ways to improve their circumstances: (I)n the real world, it is unfortunately not unheard of for some employers to financially or otherwise exploit workers, albeit legally mind you, by offering substandard living ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Axel von Schubert notes that the effect of Donald Trump’s giveaway to his billionaire buddies will be to turn the U.S. into a tax haven itself. And Michelle Chen discusses how the growth in inequality has been the result of political choices at the behest of the people ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Gwynn Guilford discusses how dependence on coal and other resources has left the U.S.’ Appalachian region both poor and ill-equipped for the future after enriching a few corporate owners. And David Dayen notes that a national tax giveaway to the rich is leading to a new round of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jerry Dias writes that a new year has already seen far too many examples of corporate greed rampaging out of control. Elizabeth Bruenig highlights the contrasting treatment of poor people who face increasingly stringent requirements to access even meager benefits, and the wealthy who are being handed ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Gerald Caplan writes about the existential threats to humanity which are being either escalated or ignored: We are rapidly approaching the same kind of escalation that led the world to the Cuban missile crisis of 1962, with humankind on the very brink of nuclear war and nuclear destruction. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Tom Parkin writes that job numbers inflated by part-time employment shouldn’t distract us from the consumer debt and wage stagnation which are living more and more people with precarious financial situations. Ben Leubsdorf reports on the recognition by members of the American Economic Association that upper-income and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Wanda Wyporska highlights the UK’s corporate executive fat cats, and argues that it’s long past time for the public to stop rewarding them: So let’s put fat cat pay in context. Yes it has come down slightly, as Sir Martin Sorrell has seen his pay cut from ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Brent Patterson rightly worries about the prospect that Justin Trudeau will choose to emulate Donald Trump’s anti-social agenda (just as he’s too often done with Stephen Harper’s): At the time of last year’s federal budget, Finance Minister Bill Morneau commented he would exercise prudence “to ensure that ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the still-growing gap between the income of CEOs and that of workers at large – and a few of the fixes which might help to reverse the trend. For further reading…– Again, David Macdonald’s latest report for the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives is here (PDF). And for those looking to compare individual ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Evening Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Jennifer Wells reports on the CCPA’s latest study of the continually-increasing chasm between corporate executives and the rest of the workforce. But the Guardian notes that disclosure of CEO pay hasn’t done anything to close the gap – signalling that stronger and more direct public policy will ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your year. – Noah Smith notes that private monopolies may be as bad for workers as they are for consumers, as a lack of alternative employers results in near-total power for corporate behemoths: (I)n addition to monopolies, we need to think about local monopsonies — cases where there’s only one employer, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Evening Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Brian Bethune interviews Joseph Stiglitz about his longstanding recognition that an international economic system biased toward capital could lay the groundwork for Trump-style demagoguery. – Kristin Annable reports on the Manitoba PCs’ steps toward for-profit health care as an alternative to properly funding and managing the public system. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Richard Partington writes that the poorest Britons stand to bear the brunt of the next wave of technological change through further diminished employment prospects. But Peter Goodman points out that a stronger social safety net in Sweden (among other countries) tends to ensure that workers share in the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Eduardo Porter examines how high-end tax cuts create gains for only the wealthy few. And Lydia DePillis points out that decades of increases to top-end incomes haven’t translated into anything close to proportional spending which would share the gains with society at large. – Juan Williams writes that ...