Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Edward Harrison comments on the business-backed push to rebrand corporate control and crony capitalism as freedom. And Ryan Cooper points out that the concept of deregulation ultimately serves only to concentrate power in the hands of the wealthy few: Government regulations can be good or bad. But for ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Drew Brown discusses how the Libs’ claim to represent – or even understand – the interests of Canada’s middle class is disappearing. And Steven Chase and Robert Fife expose Bill Morneau’s broken promise to set up a blind trust for his assets while he makes decisions which will ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Ian Welsh neatly summarizes the rules needed to ensure that capitalism doesn’t drown out social good: Capitalism, as it works, destroys itself in a number of ways. For capitalism to work, it must be prevented from doing so: it must not be allowed to form unregulated monopolies ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Asad Abbasi reviews a new book following up on Thomas Piketty’s work on the causes of inequality. – Peter Goodman and Jonathan Soble point out that the combination of tight job markets and stagnant wages has become a consistent reality in the developed world – and that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Joseph Stiglitz discusses how the Republican’s trillion-dollar corporate giveaway will only exacerbate inequality without doing anything to help the U.S.’ economy: If inequality was a problem before, enacting the Republicans’ proposed tax reform will make it much worse. Corporations and businesses will be among the big beneficiaries, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – The Equality Trust examines the UK’s increasing level of personal precarity – and how public policy needs to be changed to support the people who need it, not those who already have the most. And Eduardo Porter offers a reminder that tax cuts for the rich do nothing ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Joseph Parilla examines how entrenched inequality serves as a barrier to economic development for everybody.  – Heather Long highlights how the U.S.’ last round of corporate tax cuts led to lower wages for all but the lucky few. And Stuart Bailey writes about the need for public policy ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Anushka Asthana, Jessica Elgot and Rowena Mason report on Jeremy Corbyn’s path as Labour leader – which include genuinely moving the UK’s political centre of gravity to the left while improving his party’s electoral prospects in the process. – Andrew Boozary and Danielle Martin write that the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Linda McQuaig writes that it’s long past time to review our tax system to make sure it isn’t unfairly leaking money to the people who need it least: These high rollers are able to avoid substantial amounts of tax by setting up private corporations and then funneling their ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Mike Savage and John Hills write about the respective takes on the sources of inequality provided by Tony Atkinson, Thomas Piketty and Joseph Stiglitz. And Michael Spence discusses how economic development needs to be inclusive and based on trust in order to be sustainable: First, as we concluded ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the corporate sector’s expectation that it will be able to write laws and set public policy for its own benefit – and the disturbing number of examples of it being allowed to do just that. For further reading…– Jenny Uechl reported on both the secret CAPP meetings which set British Columbia’s climate policy ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Kevin McKean discusses how inequality undermines the goal of ensuring a healthy population. Matt Bruenig examines new data showing that the concentration of wealth in the U.S. is getting more extreme by the year. Steven Pearlstein writes about new polling showing that the U.S. public strongly favours ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Stephanie Blankenburg and Richard Kozul-Wright comment on the rise of rent-seeking as a driver of stagnation and inequality. And George Monbiot argues that we shouldn’t let our common wealth be used for the sole benefit of a privileged few: A true commons is managed not for the accumulation ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Phillip Inman and Jill Treanor write about the debt time bomb facing UK households. Jim Edwards discusses how widespread underemployment has become the norm in the UK – making unemployment alone a misleading indicator as to workers’ well-being. And Owen Jones highlights how those developments are the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Janine Jackson interviews Sarah Anderson about the lack of any public return on massive U.S. corporate tax breaks. And Greg Jericho discusses a new IMF study finding the same result for high-end tax cuts in developed economies generally, as giveaways to the rich fall short of promises ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Ed Finn discusses how corporate giants exert far more influence than we generally know – or should be willing to accept. And Joseph Schwartz and Bhaskar Sunkara comment on the difficulty in achieving durable social-democratic policies while economic power is concentrated in the corporate elite. – Thomas ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Stefan Stern writes that our current corporate culture needs to be changed in ways going far beyond reining in excessive executive compensation: Wage inequality is also a symbol of something more fundamentally wrong in the business world. Too many corporations are competing to achieve the wrong results in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Alex Himelfarb writes about the need to expand our idea of what’s possible through collective action: Is Trump the product of over forty years of attacks on the very idea of government, of decades in which government seemed to back away from our lives, when the best it ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Sarah Anderson studies how corporate tax cuts enrich CEOs, but don’t do anything to help workers. And she then follows up with this op-ed: If claims about the job-creation benefits of lower tax rates had any validity, these 92 consistently profitable firms would be among the nation’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Leo Gerard calls for an end to trade deals designed to favour the wealthy at the expense of everybody else. And Rick Salutin writes that NAFTA can’t reasonably be seen as anything but: (N)o matter how many numbers Freeland plucks to show the economy’s mighty growth in the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones calls out the dogmatic centre for first laying the groundwork for the rise of the populist right, then trying to vilify anybody working on a progressive alternative. And Chris Dillow zeroes in on what’s wrong with the neoliberal view of the world: – Insufficient scepticism ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Roderick Benns interviews Ryan Meili about the value of a basic income in freeing people from perpetual financial stress. And Doug Cameron reminds us that we have a choice whether to show empathy toward people facing homelessness – even if far too many forces try to push us ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Asher Schechter examines new studies showing how massive markups are enriching corporations at the expense of workers: The two standard explanations for why labor’s share of output has fallen by 10 percent over the past 30 years are globalization (American workers are losing out to their counterparts ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Jerry Dias writes that corporate greed is the common thread in numerous stories about Canadian workers being left without jobs or support. And Yves Engler points out that trade agreements have ultimately served little purpose but to entrench corporate power. – Chris Doucouliagos reminds us that inequality ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Linda McQuaig makes the case as to why any NAFTA renegotiation needs to focus on workers’ rights: NAFTA has been key to the transformation of Canada over the last two decades, enabling corporations to become ever more dominant economically and politically, while rendering our labour force increasingly vulnerable ...