Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Evening Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Glen Pearson follows up on the importance of organized labour – particularly as a desperately-needed counterweight to the pressures faced by public officials which may not be obvious to anybody less connected to the political scene: I often thought about this during my time in the Canadian ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your day. – Yes, it’s blasphemy to point out the obvious returns on public investments. But let’s point out a couple more examples: Andrew Jackson wonders why we’re not looking to lock in low interest rates, while Paul Krugman points out that infrastructure investments will offer even more bang for the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – Dr. Dawg asks some rather important questions about whether we think our current checks and balances are enough to rein in the Harper Cons: The lesson of the first story is, for me, how quickly the “normal” can be disrupted, our country taking a sharp and nasty turn ...

Accidental Deliberations: On selective concerns

The past decade-plus in Canadian politics has seen a non-stop series of changes to tax rates and structures – with a particular focus on handing yet more money to those who already have the most. And I’ll challenge readers to find a single commentator suggesting that we hold off on the next proposed giveaway because ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Duncan Cameron points out how the Cons are copying the Republican economics that have led the U.S. to ruin: The Harper Conservatives model their economic policies on beliefs held dear by American Republicans: just lower taxes, and reduce government, and business will create the wealth. With this approach, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Stephen Maher points out the type of government that we’ve come to count on under the ultra-controlling Harper political model: This presidentialization of the Canadian system is worrying, not because of some fetishistic attachment to the trappings of Parliament, but because it allows for greater centralization than ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your midweek reading. – Rachel Mendleson reports on research showing that inequality is correlated to mortality rates within a particular city – with the sole exception of communities with a high proportion of immigrants. Which makes it awfully tempting to suggest that based on their combination of inequality-exacerbating and immigration-limiting policies, the ...

Troubling questions about CETA ‘s impact on municipalities

As negotiations between Canada and the EU near their completion we still don’t know many of the details as our government only sees fit to brief business interests on them, but what we do know is extremely troubling. CETA in the governments own words is the “most robust” trade and investment agreement we have ever ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Emily Dee takes a first look at what may be a highly important story about the Cons’ use of the notorious right-wing push-poller Responsive Media Group: I had been conducting some research into the last federal election campaign, which was probably the most bizarre on record. Many ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Stephanie Larocque highlights the Cons’ gall in hanging onto federal reimbursements from their own ad scam even after having admitted their guilt: You don’t have to prove guilt when the charged plead guilty. And that is exactly what happened last week when the Conservative Party entered into an ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Frances Russell wonders what happened to the concept of the public good: Our political language about taxes has changed. Gone is “ability to pay.” The new catchphrases are “user pay” and “pay as you go.” The bottom-line message to citizens is “if you can’t pay, you don’t ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Linda McQuaig points out how the Occupy movement has at least started to shift the terms of our political debate: Rather than hanging out at malls or zoning out on Facebook, these young people have endured real hardship in the Canadian near-winter to fight for a more ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your afternoon reading. – Stephen Maher exhorts the Cons to stop stifling democratic debate, featuring a strong point by NDP MP Jack Harris: When Harris was first elected to Parliament in 1987, he said, and Brian Mulroney had a majority, the government regularly adopted opposition amendments. “We don’t expect you to adopt ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Charlie Angus’ concerns about the Cons’ Albany Club schmoozing nicely parallel my take on the entire lobbying apparatus they’ve built up: Mr. Angus said the Albany Club reception is an example of the kind of informal lobbying, through cozy relationships, that has grown under Mr. Harper’s watch. “My ...

Accidental Deliberations: On selective funding

Most of the focus on this story has been based on the exclusion of opposition parties from global climate talks. But the bigger scandal should be who the Cons are willing to fund to attend: Canada’s delegation will include members of the governing Conservative Party, as well as business leaders and other experts. Taxpayers will ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your afternoon reading. – Paul Dechene is duly scathing in comparing the City of Regina’s tax giveaways to big business (which are of course added on top of hundreds of millions in provincial tax abatements) to its utter refusal to provide any benefits to non-profit organizations: Been thinking about building an office ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to end your weekend. – Jeffrey Sachs muses that the Occupy movement may just be the beginning of a sea change in American politics: Both parties have joined in crippling the government in response to the demands of their wealthy campaign contributors, who above all else insist on keeping low tax rates on ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

This and that for your evening reading. – Erin offers up his suggestions for the Saskatchewan NDP’s renewal process: The next NDP leader will presumably be met with a barrage of negative advertising from the Sask Party. New Democrats would do well to elect a leader who will be less vulnerable than Lingenfelter to such ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Evening Links

Assorted content for your evening reading. – Murray Dobbin nicely summarizes what the Cons are hoping to do in prioritizing big-money “philanthropy” over a functional state and civil society: Ideology is meaning in the service of power, and the Conservative government, libertarian to its core, intends to create the appearance of an increasingly volunteer society ...

Dr Vandana Shiva: No More Food Dictatorships

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Rick Salutin nicely describes what’s behind the “charity” model of top-end wish fulfillment that the Cons are pitching in place of actual social programs: The Old Philanthropy, aside from a few big foundations that now look modest, was embodied in wealthy people who went on boards like the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Dan Gardner highlights how Stephen Harper is imposing exactly the kind of costly, top-down policies on Canada’s provinces that he once railed against: This week, at least five provincial governments, starting with Quebec and Ontario, said they will refuse to pay the increased costs created by the mandatory ...

Rusty Idols: The Price

Republicans hate Keynesianism – unless its military Keynesianism sustaining southern and gunbelt constituencies with Military industrial complex jobs that require a constant state of fear mongering and international belligerence to sustain.  The rest of the American population subsidizes these jobs by forgoing the kind of basic social safety net every other industrialized nation takes for ...

Writings of J. Todd Ring: BBC speechless as trader tells truth: “Collapse is coming… and Goldman Sachs rules the world”

Move your money now – put it into gold, silver, and if you can, more importantly, a piece of land that can feed your family, tools for self-reliance such as solar and wind energy, seeds and garden tools, a trailer, teepee, yurt or cottage, in case you have to fall back on these.  Equally, or ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on Saskatchewan’s unique opportunity to translate the widespread public concerns about inequality and corporate control highlighted by the Occupy movement into electoral change. For further reading, here’s the Abacus poll referred to in the column.