Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – Ritika Goel writes that good jobs lead to all kinds of ancillary benefits to both the health of workers, and the strength of the overall economy: We are in a time of increasing part-time, casual, temporary and contract work, with less access to benefits, insurance and pensions. Women, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Bessma Momani writes that Donald Trump’s plan to leave the U.S. at the mercy of unregulated financial markets figures to cause another crisis comparable to – or worse than – that of 2008: Nearly 10 years ago, the U.S. financial industry was exposed as a glorified Ponzi ...

We Pivot: You Probably Already Support Postal Banking Too

CUPW, the union for Canada Post workers, has had some innovative ideas lately which the Harper and Trudeau governments are, not surprisingly, not too keen on. Both governments pursue a neoliberal privatization agenda. Public services like CBC and Canada Post provide no profit layer to companies because they exist as public services. Privatizing them lets ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Valerie Strauss discusses the disastrous effects of corporatized education in the U.S. And Alex Hemingway examines how B.C.’s government (like Saskatchewan’s) is going out of its way to make it impossible for a public education system to do its job of offering a bright future to all ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Armine Yalnizyan writes that the response to the European Commission’s finding that Apple has dodged $20 billion in taxes may tell us all we need to know about the relative power of governments and corporations: The EC is also investigating state support received by Amazon and McDonalds in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Armine Yalnizyan writes that the response to the European Commission’s finding that Apple has dodged $20 billion in taxes may tell us all we need to know about the relative power of governments and corporations: The EC is also investigating state support received by Amazon and McDonalds in ...

Northern Reflections: Coming Down The Pike

Canada Post and CUPW have reached an agreement. But that’s not the end of the story. The real drama, Tom Walkom writes, is just beginning: The main event – what to do with the Crown corporation – is set to begin next month. That’s when a four-person task force set up by Justin Trudeau’s Liberal ...

Northern Reflections: Coming Down The Pike

Canada Post and CUPW have reached an agreement. But that’s not the end of the story. The real drama, Tom Walkom writes, is just beginning: The main event – what to do with the Crown corporation – is set to begin next month. That’s when a four-person task force set up by Justin Trudeau’s Liberal ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Chris Hamby starts off what looks to be a must-read investigation on the effect of ISDS rules by discussing how they’re used to prevent governments from punishing corporate wrongdoing: (A)n 18-month BuzzFeed News investigation, spanning three continents and involving more than 200 interviews and tens of thousands ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Chris Hamby starts off what looks to be a must-read investigation on the effect of ISDS rules by discussing how they’re used to prevent governments from punishing corporate wrongdoing: (A)n 18-month BuzzFeed News investigation, spanning three continents and involving more than 200 interviews and tens of thousands ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Paolo Giuliano and Antonio Spilimbergo study (PDF) how the economic conditions an individual’s youth influence enduring values – and find that the experience of an economic shock tends to lead to a greater appreciation of a fair redistribution of resources: Consistent with theories of social psychology, this ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ann McFeatters reminds us of the good a government can do when it dedicates itself to identifying and responding to urgent public needs. And Bill McKibben makes the case for an all-out mobilization against climate change: We’re used to war as metaphor: the war on poverty, the war ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Owen Jones interviews Ha-Joon Chang about the foreseeable harm caused by the UK’s austerity, as well as the false claims used to push it. – The Stoney Creek News rightly argues that Canada Post should move toward posting banking in large part due to the potential to improve ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Melisa Foster points out why millennials should be strongly interested in a national pharmacare program: Today, young Canadians are searching for jobs in an economy with high levels of precarious employment, unemployment or underemployment. According to a recent Statistics Canada labour force survey, approximately 39% of workers 15 ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Lana Payne discusses how inequality and insecurity inevitably serve as the key explanation for the rise of right-wing populism. And Adam Johnson rightly challenges the theory being presented by some that the answer to expressions of frustration by people left out of policy decision-making is to restrict democracy ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Trevor Hancock writes that if we’re going to designate anything as a public health emergency, poverty should top the list: I was pleased to see the B.C. Ministry of Health use the powers of the provincial health officer to designate opioid drug overdose deaths a public-health emergency. But ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your long weekend reading. – Marc Jarsulic, Ethan Gurwitz, Kate Bahn and Andy Green comment on how corporate monopoly power and rent-seeking produce disastrous public consequences: Income inequality is rising, middle-class incomes are stagnant, and much of the current economic policy debate is centered on finding ways to counter these trends. A ...

Alberta Politics: It’s time for a national postal bank in both Canada and the United States

PHOTOS: The little Post Office in downtown St. Albert, where your blogger lives, which Canada Post is anxious to close as soon as possible. Below: The U.S. Post Office in Fallon, Montana, the Canadian Post Office in Dewberry, Alberta (villageofdewberry.ca), American social activist Ralph Nader, and Service Alberta Minister Stephanie McLean. We now live in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – James Wilt discusses a much-needed effort to map out the connections between fossil fuel corporations. And Bruce Campbell highlights how the resource sector is among the most prominent examples of regulatory capture in Canada. – Meanwhile, Steven Chase notes that even as Stephane Dion tries to excuse the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Ben Casselman writes that rather than looking to manufacturing jobs alone as a precondition to gains for workers, we should instead focus on the unions which helped to make the manufacturing sector the source of stable, higher-wage work: Why do factory workers make more in Michigan? In a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – David Rosen discusses the connection between poverty and more general social exclusion: Poverty is a form of social powerlessness.  The poorer you are, the weaker you are, the harder your life; everything is about survival.  Poverty can be analyzed in two complementary ways – who and where.  By ...

The Canadian Progressive: Harper’s Bill C-6 Violated Canadian Postal Workers’ Charter Rights, Court Rules

The Ontario Superior Court has ruled that the former Harper government violated postal workers’ Charter rights when it ordered postal workers back to work through Bill C-6 in 2011. The post Harper’s Bill C-6 Violated Canadian Postal Workers’ Charter Rights, Court Rules appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – CBC and the Star have both started reporting on the Panama Papers – offering a glimpse of the tip of the iceberg of international tax avoidance. And the Star also recognizes why we shouldn’t let grey-area tax scheming pass without appropriate scrutiny, while Canadians for Tax Fairness reminds ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – The Star-Phoenix calls for Saskatchewan’s election campaign to focus on the future rather than the past. And Paul Orlowski reminds us of the continued callous corporatism that’s in store if Brad Wall holds on to power. – Meanwhile, Bruce Johnstone points out that the Saskatchewan Party’s spin on ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Andrew Jackson discusses how large inheritance and accumulated capital lead to gross economic and social distortions: Inheritances are quite heavily concentrated among the most affluent families and thus compound income and wealth inequality over time. Inheritances continue to play a significant role in the accumulation of wealth in ...