Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how we shouldn’t believe any of the unenforceable promises Brad Wall and his government will make to try to pitch a SaskTel selloff – and how citizens stand to lose out from a sale. For further reading…– CBC reported on Wall’s going out of his way to push privatization – including confirmation that ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here (via PressReader), on how Brad Wall is preaching neglect and delay as a response to violent racism (even as he’s fully prepared to use as much political capital as he can muster pitching the idea of a SaskTel selloff). For further reading…– Wall’s comments which try to minimize Saskatchewan’s racism are here. And Donna ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Brad Wall is preaching neglect and delay as a response to violent racism (even as he’s fully prepared to use as much political capital as he can muster pitching the idea of a SaskTel selloff). For further reading…– Wall’s comments which try to minimize Saskatchewan’s racism are here. And Donna Harpauer’s statement ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – David Dayen wonders whether the Obama administration’s decision to end the use of private prisons might represent the needed start of a movement away from relying on poor corporate services as a substitute for public action: Private prisons experienced more safety and security incidents. They had higher rates ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – David Dayen wonders whether the Obama administration’s decision to end the use of private prisons might represent the needed start of a movement away from relying on poor corporate services as a substitute for public action: Private prisons experienced more safety and security incidents. They had higher rates ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Martin Jacques writes about the inescapable failings of neoliberalism, along with the question of what alternative will come next: (B)y historical standards, the neoliberal era has not had a particularly good track record. The most dynamic period of postwar western growth was that between the end of the ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the Saskatchewan Party’s decision to try to make up for its gross mismanagement by squeezing benefits out of people with disabilities. For further reading…– This year’s provincial budget spin from the Ministry of Social Services is here, featuring the following: Government’s next steps on the Saskatchewan Disability Strategy will focus on the Where ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Norman Farrell highlights how following the reversal of the HST transition, B.C. businesses haven’t given up on their goal of making sure that only individuals pay consumption taxes. – Jordan Press and Lee Berthiaume report on the lack of any recent effort to ensure that federal government buildings ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Thomas Walkom discusses Mel Hurtig’s philosophy of economic nationalism, while noting that Canada stands out as an exception in lacking a strong movement toward greater internal planning and economic control. And Maude Barlow looks back at Hurtig’s work, while Melissa Fundira reports that the Libs are trying ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Melisa Foster points out why millennials should be strongly interested in a national pharmacare program: Today, young Canadians are searching for jobs in an economy with high levels of precarious employment, unemployment or underemployment. According to a recent Statistics Canada labour force survey, approximately 39% of workers 15 ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Mariana Mazzucato discusses (JPG) the importance of an intelligent industrial strategy. And David Kotz argues that neoliberal capitalism has reached the point where there’s no plausible path toward sustainable growth without a new economic model: For several decades, neoliberal capitalism was able to bring a series of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Atrios offers a reminder as to how means-testing tends to make social programs more vulnerable to attack without making our overall tax system more progressive: We already means test through the tax code. It’s called progressive taxation. There’s no reason to add an entire additional layer of complexity ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Bjarke Skærlund Risager interviews David Harvey about the history and effect of neoliberalism: I’ve always treated neoliberalism as a political project carried out by the corporate capitalist class as they felt intensely threatened both politically and economically towards the end of the 1960s into the 1970s. They desperately ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here (via PressReader), on how the North Saskatchewan River oil spill may not lead directly to a needed reevaluation of the risks of pipelines – but a public expectation that we’ll shift away from dirty energy may be more significant in the long run. For further reading…– I’ve previously posted about Brad Wall’s response to ...

Alberta Politics: Brad Wall: a day late and a dollar short on Husky’s Prince Albert pipeline rupture

PHOTOS: Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall speaking with reporters in the halls of Saskatchewan Legislative Building in Regina yesterday (screen grab from the CBC’s feed). Below: Alberta Premier Rachel Notley and the city of Prince Albert on the bank of the North Saskatchewan River. Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall’s lame defence yesterday morning of his strange inaction ...

Alberta Politics: NDP moves to end secret Klein-era scheme to offload corporate losses on the public – the opposition, predictably, screams

PHOTOS: Deputy Premier Sarah Hoffman, a photo that wasn’t taken yesterday, obviously, but has the advantage of having been taken by your blogger. Below: Wildrose electricity and renewables critic Don MacIntyre, Progressive Conservative interim Leader Ric McIver and the late PC premier Ralph Klein, author of the costly-to-Albertans scheme the NDP is asking the courts ...

Accidental Deliberations: Polluted by crimes, but torn by no remorse

Shorter Brad Wall on what’s truly important as an oil spill pollutes drinking water along the North Saskatchewan River: I only hope this monster running amok doesn’t make it harder to sell new reanimation technologies. Or in graphic form…

Montreal Simon: The Continuing Adventures of the Annoying Oil Pimp Brad Wall

Canada's premiers have made more progress in the last few months than they made in the almost ten years Stephen Harper ruled this country.And they do have good reason to celebrate.But there is always one party pooper, and it would have to be Brad Wall. The grubby little oil pimp from Saskatchewan, who spent much of that ...

Alberta Politics: Brad Wall Government’s Saskatchewan beer trade piffle turns out to be all fizz and no flavour

ILLUSTRATIONS: A group of Albertans enjoying one of our province’s excellent craft beers, unfortunately unavailable in Saskatchewan because of the province-to-the-right’s unfair trade practices. (The Wikipedia illustration is actually of François Jaques’ Peasants Enjoying Beer at Pub in Fribourg.) Below: Brad Wall, Saskatchewan’s disagreeable premier gestures disagreeably in the Saskatchewan Legislature (photo paid for by ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here (via PressReader), on the impending premiers’ summit – and the need for any new deal on internal trade to recognize that provinces have to maintain the ability to foster their own economic development. For further reading…– Bill Curry and Robert Fife reported here on the pre-summit PR campaign to force the provinces to sign ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – John Milloy discusses the difference between trade and corporate control – while noting that recent “trade agreements” have tended to favour the latter without being the subject of meaningful public debate: For far too long, elites have characterized trade discussions as too complicated for the general public to ...

Alberta Politics: Standard & Poor’s downgrades Saskatchewan’s credit rating and The Anger Machine falls silent

PHOTOS: Like a flock of starlings, the entire Canadian Perpetual Outrage Industry knows when to wheel and turn instantly. Since they do it electronically, it’s almost as if they’re … a machine! Below: Brad Wall, the crumbling Colossus of the Prairies, and Stephen Harper, the former prime minister of Canada, snapped in Calgary’s Blackfoot Diner ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on this week’s Canada Pension Plan announcement – and the Wall government’s surprising decision to merely delay rather than outright obstruct a national boost to retirement security. For further reading…– Kevin Milligan, Sheila Block, Adam Mayers and the Canadian Press each offer useful looks at what the CPP expansion means. And Milligan has also ...

Accidental Deliberations: On risk factors

Yes, “grasping at straws” is the right analysis of the Sask Party’s attempt to make excuses to gift SaskTel to the corporate sector. But it’s also worth noting something those straws have in common. Presumably any risk to SaskTel can be paired with an opportunity for another party looking to profit within the telecom sector. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Phillipe Orliange discusses the significance of inequality in the developing world as a problem for both fairness and economic development: The question of inequality has become so important because societal cohesion broadly depends upon it. It is not normal for 1% of the population to possess as much ...