Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Alex Collinson discusses how insecure work makes it impossible to reliably structure an individual’s life: Many respondents told us about how difficult it is to budget without knowing how much you’ll be earning from one week to the next. The number of hours we are given every ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how a misguided war against “red tape” contributed to the deaths of dozens in the Grenfell Tower fire – and how we’re at risk of becoming casualties as well. For further reading…– Details about the UK’s obsession with red tape can be found in archives including the home page and housing and construction ...

Alberta Politics: Saskatchewan credit rating downgraded for second time by Standard & Poor’s and all we hear are crickets!

PHOTOS: It’s quiet here on Crickets Avenue. Don’t expect a Wildrose of PC press release to come along any time soon. (Photo: Billy Hathorn, Wikimedia Commons) Below: Standard & Poor’s headquarters in New York City (Photo: Uncredited, Wikimedia Commons); Brad Wall, the real leader of Western Canada, or so they say. (Photo: Daniel Paquet, Wikimedia ...

Canadian Political Viewpoints: $21,932.61

Source: CJME News: Saskatchewan Health Authority Board Members Named What’s this? Two blog posts in a row? While you try to get over the shock of such rapid posting, allow me to fill you into the somewhat cryptic number you find in the title of the post. Earlier today, the Saskatchewan Government announced the board ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Martin Lukacs contrasts Justin Trudeau’s hype machine against the genuine hope offered by Jeremy Corbyn, while Paul Mason sees the election result as just a first battle against the UK’s ruling elite. And Thomas Walkom discusses how left populism is the real winner of the UK’s general ...

Accidental Deliberations: On selective sacrifice

Brad Wall’s definition of shared sacrifice: Public service workers are expected to do their jobs plus more to cover for a hiring freeze, while also getting hit with a 3.5% pay cut. At the same time, specially-selected Saskatchewan Party MLAs get handed new titles without any accompanying work, plus $3,000 free to go with it. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Michal Rozworski highlights how UK Labour’s platform provides for a needed move toward the democratization of economic activity along with an end to gratuitous austerity. And a distinguished group of economists has signed on to support the plan. – Charlie Skelton examines how this year’s Bilderberg conference is ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how several other provinces are setting new (and necessary standards) for worker protections while Saskatchewan falls further behind. For further reading…– Ontario’s Changing Workplaces Review is here (in full), and here (in summary form). CBC reports on Kathleen Wynne’s subsequent minimum wage announcement, while Sheila Block crunches the numbers on how it will ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Diane Cardwell points out how carbon politics are threatening renewable energy just at the point where it would win a fair fight against fossil fuels. And J. David Hughes finds that any case for Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline falls apart in the face of realistic assumptions about ...

Accidental Deliberations: On sucker’s deals

While my Leader-Post column won’t be running this week, I’ll take the opportunity to offer some context and an update on Geoff Leo’s must-read report on Brightenview’s founders who have become the Wall government’s latest corporate darlings. By way of background, Leo was also the one to break the news about how the Saskatchewan Party’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Josh Bivens notes that U.S. corporations are already paying a lower share of taxes than has historically been the case – meaning that there’s no air of reality to the claim that handing them more money will produce any positive economic results. And Noah Smith writes that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Dalia Marin argues that in order to avoid corporate dominance over citizens and workers around the globe, we should be developing international competition policies and systems to combat the concentration of wealth: Two forces in today’s digital economy are driving the global decline in labor’s share of total ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Claire Provost writes about the spread of the private security industry – which now exceeds the size of public police forces in Canada among other countries – as a means of privileging the protection of wealth over public interests. – Meanwhile, Lana Payne comments on the importance of ...

Canadian Political Viewpoints: You Get a P3! And You Get a P3! Everybody Gets a P3!

SOURCE: CBC News: Sask. Spending Millions on Companies that Bid on Work and LoseSOURCE: Leader Post: Sask. Government Gave $5.6 Million to Companies for Failed P3 Bids When it was announced earlier today that Brad Wall had sent off another prodding letter to the Federal Government to saber-rattle over the looming Carbon Tax; my first ...

Canadian Political Viewpoints: Long Gone to Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan, we need to talk. There is a very real problem in this province, regardless of whether or not you want to admit it, but we need to talk about it. To put our fingers in our ears and sing our lungs out isn’t going to do anyone any good; instead, we need to admit ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the growing list of similarities between Brad Wall’s Saskatchewan Party and Christy Clark’s B.C. Libs – and why voters in both provinces should demand far more attention than their government is willing to offer. For further reading…– Gary Mason describes the background to British Columbia’s #IAmLinda campaign theme. And PressProgress follows up on ...

Alberta Politics: Inclusion of 1905 act in Constitution means Brad Wall’s ‘Notwithstanding Clause’ gambit is no slam-dunk

PHOTOS: Premier Brad Wall of Saskatchewan (Photo: CBC). Below: Edmonton lawyer Simon Renouf. If Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall thinks he can just snap his fingers and the Notwithstanding Clause of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms will make his Catholic school troubles go away, he may need to think again. In a comment about ...

Alberta Politics: Funny … not a peep on the right about Jason Kenney stumping for a Liberal

PHOTOS: Sandra Jansen, back in the day when she never imagined she’s be anything but a Tory. Below: Jason Kenney, leader today of the Progressive Conservative Party of Alberta; Rachel Notley, whose NDP Government was elected on May 5, 2017; and Brad Wall, the man with a plan to save Saskatchewan’s Catholic schools. (Photo: Daniel ...

Alberta Politics: Missing Jason Kenney surfaces, safe and sound, speaking up for Christy Clark at chichi Vancouver steak house

PHOTOS: Alberta Progressive Conservative Leader Jason Kenney, from the days no so long ago he could still be found in in this province. Below, from various Twitter photos: Vancouver journalist Bob Mackin, “Liberal” B.C. Premier Christy Clark, and Conservative federal leadership candidate Andrew Scheer. Got questions for the elusive Jason Kenney? Look no further than ...

Canadian Political Viewpoints: Forget the Wall, We’ve Just Opened a Hell of a Door

Source: CBC News – Saskatchewan Government Passes Bill 40 Allowing Partial Sale of Crowns Let’s ignore the long absence, and just get right to it, shall we? We’ve talked about Bill 40 before on the blog, and how the government was making overtures towards moving the goal line on what is and is not “privatization”. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Christian Cooper discusses how poverty is like a disease in its effect on a person’s mental and physical well-being. And Andre Picard highlights the reality that in order to address the damage done by centuries of systematic discrimination against Canada’s indigenous people, we need to start making up ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Paul Krugman notes that after promising to bring some outside perspective to politics, Donald Trump is instead offering only a warmed-over version of the Republicans’ typical voodoo economics. And John Cassidy highlights how Trump’s plan appears to be nothing more than to wage class warfare on behalf of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Eva Schaherl offers her take on how to fight against climate change: Stop being distracted by the “Sad!” theatre of the Greatest Show on Earth across our southern border. In Canada our leadership debates should be focused on how to save the world’s life-support systems, not imitating the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Andrew Jackson discusses the problems with increased corporate concentration of wealth and power – including the need for a response that goes beyond competition policies. In the 1960s, institutional economists like John Kenneth Galbraith described a world of oligopoly in which a few firms, such as the big ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Martin Patriquin takes Saskatchewan’s increasing recognition of the Wall government’s institutional corruption to the national stage: Politicians who navigate a corrupted political system have some of the easiest jobs in the world. With the weight and legitimacy of the state behind them, they need not sell anything ...