Views from the Beltline: Guess which country dodged Trump’s travel ban

President Donald Trump has manifested his regime’s Islamophobia with a ban on the nationals of seven majority-Muslim countries entering the U.S. for at least 90 days. The choice of countries is odd. Not a single citizen from any of these countries has ever committed a terrorist act in the United States. Not one. On the ...

Views from the Beltline: Guess which country dodged Trump’s travel ban

President Donald Trump has manifested his regime’s Islamophobia with a ban on the nationals of seven majority-Muslim countries entering the U.S. for at least 90 days. The choice of countries is odd. Not a single citizen from any of these countries has ever committed a terrorist act in the United States. Not one. On the ...

The Wandering Joe: Oil Oil Everywhere, and not a Barrel to Burn

There has been a lot of hand-wringing over the recent crash in crude oil prices. Ironically, both environmentalists who want people to stop buying oil and many of the producers who need people to buy more are both challenged by the current price point. To be honest, I couldn’t give a tinker’s damn about the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – David Brin examines the crucial role the public sector plays in driving economic development – as well as the disturbingly large movement seeking to end any further progress – Anna Gorman reports on California’s ambitious plans to improve the health and social welfare of its most vulnerable ...

Views from the Beltline: Everyone has their favourite dictator

Our Prime Minister recently ran into a flood of criticism, particularly from conservatives, for his kind words to the Cubans upon the death of their leader of many years, Fidel Castro. The Trudeaus did indeed have a congenial relationship with Castro, but then, even though we all proclaim our commitment to democracy and human rights, ...

Views from the Beltline: Everyone has their favourite dictator

Our Prime Minister recently ran into a flood of criticism, particularly from conservatives, for his kind words to the Cubans upon the death of their leader of many years, Fidel Castro. The Trudeaus did indeed have a congenial relationship with Castro, but then, even though we all proclaim our commitment to democracy and human rights, ...

The Disaffected Lib: A Deal Is a Deal

Except if the deal is with Saudi Arabia And it’s a deal for weaponry And it’s the United States selling. It seems Washington has had its fill of the Saudis and their butchery in Yemen. The US is preparing to halt planned arms sales to Saudi Arabia because of the high death toll among civilians ...

The Disaffected Lib: Justin’s Folly – Selling Death Wagons to a Despotic Regime Going Broke

You remember the Saudi death wagon controversy when the Trudeau regime gave the go ahead to the sale of 15-billion dollars worth of armoured fighting vehicles to Saudi Arabia. Well, what if those death wagons fall into the hands of the very people we’ve been over there fighting, radical Sunni Islamists? Justie would have a ...

Alberta Politics: I come to bury Castro, not to praise him: unpacking conservative fury at PM Justin Trudeau’s condolences

PHOTOS: Fidel Castrol in his heyday. Mr. Castro died Friday at 90. Below: An affectionate Havana scene … “Viva Fidel por siempre;” Margaret Trudeau, Mr. Castro and Pierre Trudeau in 1976; King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia, who died at 90 last year; Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Before I start, let’s just make one thing perfectly ...

Alberta Politics: News Satire: U.S. will not tolerate foreigners acting like Americans, officials say

ILLUSTRATIONS: A map showing some of the countries in which the United States has interfered in the political process (grabbed from Geology.com). Below: U.S. CIA Director John O. Brennan, Democratic Party candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican candidate Donald Trump. The United States will not tolerate the countries of the world acting like the United States, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – David Dayen highlights the treatment of workers as the most fundamental difference between Scandinavian countries which have achieved both prosperity and social justice, and the U.S. and others which have sacrificed the latter for false promises of the former: But societies make choices at a more elemental ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Jim Tankersley interviews Joshua Bivens about the relative effects of economic growth and income inequality – and particularly his evidence showing that more people are far better off with more modest growth fairly distributed than with greater nominal growth concentrated at the top: Tankersley: How do we know ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – James Wilt discusses a much-needed effort to map out the connections between fossil fuel corporations. And Bruce Campbell highlights how the resource sector is among the most prominent examples of regulatory capture in Canada. – Meanwhile, Steven Chase notes that even as Stephane Dion tries to excuse the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Michael Klare writes about the future direction of the oil industry – which looks to involve cashing out quickly than building anything lasting: At the beginning of this century, many energy analysts were convinced that we were at the edge of the arrival of “peak oil”; a peak, ...

Politics and its Discontents: Obama: On Bended Knee To The Saudis

I’ll defer to others much better versed than I am in the vagaries of international politics to offer a more informed analysis, but the recent deference of the U.S. toward Saudi Arabia warrants a closer look. Despite, or perhaps because of, an unfortunate recent characterization by Barack Obama of the repressive Middle East kingdom as ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Alexander Panetta reports on the G20’s agreement on the need to crack down on tax evasion – as well as the steps Canada needs to take to get our own house in order: The final communique warned of actions against countries that don’t agree within a year ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – George Monbiot discusses how neoliberal ideology has managed to take over as the default assumption in global governance – despite its disastrous and readily visible effects: (T)he past four decades have been characterised by a transfer of wealth not only from the poor to the rich, but within ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – GOOD Magazine neatly sums up what the world would look like on the scale of 100 people – and how patently unfair wealth inequality looks in that context: – Lawrence Mishel and David Cooper point out that a $15 minimum wage is entirely in keeping with actual economic ...

Alberta Politics: Questions without answers: Why are our U.S. allies so ambivalent about ISIS, and what does it mean for Canada?

PHOTOS: U.S. State Department spokesperson Mark Toner. (Screen grab from C-SPAN.) Below: Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, Conservative interim Opposition Leader Rona Ambrose and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. For all we know, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad is a fine ophthalmologist with a sympathetic bedside manner. By all accounts, though, he is not a very nice person. ...

Bill Longstaff: Saudis to Alberta—Tough Shit!

Saudi oil minister Ali al-Naimi didn’t say quite what I’ve suggested in my headline, but only the words differed, not the sentiment. The Saudis, as we all know, have been opening up the oil taps lately, driving their production up and driving the price down. The low price is hurting a lot of people, including ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Alison Griswold points out how little systemic information we have about the growing gig economy. And both Scott Santens and Richard Reeves make the case for a basic income to provide financial security where an increasingly precarious labour market won’t. – Meanwhile, Branko Milanovic argues that we ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Robert Atkinson discusses the need for corporate tax policy to encourage economic development rather than profit-taking and share inflation. And Jim Hightower notes that it’s an anti-democratic corporate mindset that led to the poisoning of Flint. – Stephen Tapp offers some noteworthy ideas to ensure the public can ...

Politics and its Discontents: It Isn’t Just About Jobs

Although we live in a time that seems to demand almost constant preoccupation with the economy and jobs, sometimes there are more important considerations, such as a country’s moral standing. Right now, that moral standing is in jeopardy thanks to the apparent inflexibility of the Trudeau government on the Saudi Arabian armaments deal. While it ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Errol Mendes points out that any commitment to securing human rights in our foreign policy is currently limited by the lack of any systematic attempt to see how those rights are being treated. And Rick Mercer rants about the Libs’ gall in misleading Canadians about the sales of ...

Montreal Simon: The Con Clown Circus and the Hypocrisy of Tony Clement

Uh oh. Move over Michelle Rempel. There's a new star at Rona Ambrose's Con clown circus. His name is Tony Clement also known as The King of Muskoka. Or the new shadow minister of Foreign Affairs.And he couldn't be funnier… Read more »