Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Katie Allen reports on the growing gap between the privileged few and the working class in the UK. And Frank Elgar highlights how we all pay the price of inequality, even as our governments can’t be bothered to rein it in: For decades, the IMF, OECD, and World ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, pointing out that Brad Wall’s deficit can be traced primarily (if not entirely) to his unproductive tax slashing – and that even an austerity-laden budget is being designed to make matters worse. For further reading…– Jason Warick’s series of reports on obvious ways to improve Saskatchewan’s fiscal situation can again be found here, here, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Josh Bivens explains why increased fairness would likely lead to improved overall growth for the U.S.’ economy: (O)ne key driver of slow productivity growth in recent years can be fixed: the remaining shortfall between aggregate demand and the economy’s productive potential. Running the economy far below potential for ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – The Star’s editorial board calls for an end to regressive federal tax breaks. And Dennis Howlett asks why the tax evaders who used KPMG’s illegal offshoring schemes are being offered secrecy and amnesty for their attempts to siphon revenue away from the Canadian public. – Michael Butler discusses ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – The Star’s editorial board calls for an end to regressive federal tax breaks. And Dennis Howlett asks why the tax evaders who used KPMG’s illegal offshoring schemes are being offered secrecy and amnesty for their attempts to siphon revenue away from the Canadian public. – Michael Butler discusses ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading: – Percy Downe notes that both the Harper Cons and Trudeau Libs have stood in the way of identifying and recouping tens of billions of dollars in unpaid taxes – leaving everybody else to pay the share of tax evaders. And Riley Sparks discusses how secret settlements – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading: – Percy Downe notes that both the Harper Cons and Trudeau Libs have stood in the way of identifying and recouping tens of billions of dollars in unpaid taxes – leaving everybody else to pay the share of tax evaders. And Riley Sparks discusses how secret settlements – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Louis-Philippe Rochon chimes in on why Justin Trudeau’s faux populism is entirely beyond belief when compared to his actions while in power: Since coming to power, the prime minister has openly pursued policies that have only exacerbated the economic situation by raising corporate profits, and by contributing to the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Louis-Philippe Rochon chimes in on why Justin Trudeau’s faux populism is entirely beyond belief when compared to his actions while in power: Since coming to power, the prime minister has openly pursued policies that have only exacerbated the economic situation by raising corporate profits, and by contributing to the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Carol Linnitt notes that British Columbia’s provincial pipeline spill map has been conspicuously disappeared by the Clark Libs in the lead up to an election where environmental protection is a major issue. And Kathy Tomlinson is the latest to highlight both the glaring lack of reasonable fund-raising ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Carol Linnitt notes that British Columbia’s provincial pipeline spill map has been conspicuously disappeared by the Clark Libs in the lead up to an election where environmental protection is a major issue. And Kathy Tomlinson is the latest to highlight both the glaring lack of reasonable fund-raising ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – David Giles reports on the increasing cost of living in Saskatchewan. And Barbara Ehrenreich writes about the future of the U.S.’ working class – including the reality that its major recent success has involved improving minimum wage levels: Now when politicians invoke “the working class,” they are likely ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – David Giles reports on the increasing cost of living in Saskatchewan. And Barbara Ehrenreich writes about the future of the U.S.’ working class – including the reality that its major recent success has involved improving minimum wage levels: Now when politicians invoke “the working class,” they are likely ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Jordy Cummings exposes the shady side of Justin Trudeau’s shin persona. Dimitri Lascaris interviews Nora Loreto about Canada’s relationship with the U.S. And Michal Rozworski challenges Trudeau’s decision to serve as a prop for Donald Trump rather than defending Canadian values: The point to remember is that there would ...

Accidental Deliberations: On non-solutions

Tammy Robert thoroughly documents how Brad Wall’s billion-dollar deficit has nothing to do with either resource revenues (being Wall’s primary excuse for blowing up the budget), or public services (which are his first target for attacks): I can’t consider the way the Saskatchewan government has handled the prospect of streamlining public service – or even this ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Martin Kenney comments on Canada’s continuing role in “snow washing” offshore tax evasion. The Conference Board of Canada examines the massive gap between what Canada should receive in public revenues, and what’s actually taken in to keep our society functioning. And Kamal Ahmed highlights how employers are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Bruce Campbell points out how Donald Trump’s blind hatred toward any type of regulation can impose costs in Canada and elsewhere to the extent we’re bound by trade deals which make “harmonization” an expected standard. And Pia Eberhardt recognizes that there’s no point in locking ourselves into the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Scott Sinclair offers his take on what we can expect Donald Trump to pursue in renegotiating NAFTA, and points out that while there are some options which might boost Canadian manufacturing and other sectors, it’s also possible that matters could get far worse for the citizens of all ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Liam Byrne argues that it’s long past time to reevaluate an economic framework which has produced only highly concentrated wealth for a lucky few at everybody else’s expense. And Graeme Wearden reports on Oxfam’s call to rein in both firm-level tax avoidance, and government policy oriented toward eliminating ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Colin Busby and Ramya Muthukumaran offer some suggestions as to how to ensure there’s an adequate social safety net to support people stuck with precarious work: Federal and provincial governments, acting in concert or independently, should reduce the uncertainties of a volatile labour market for newcomers and incumbents. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Jared Bernstein argues that the limited stimulus provided by tax cuts for the rich is far from worth the overall costs of exacerbating inequality and damaging public revenues: I’m encountering progressives who are compelled to be at least somewhat supportive of wasteful, regressive tax cuts, like those proposed ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Christo Aivalis offers some suggestions for a set of progressive and effective tax policies: My view is that the Left has to combine the general philosophy of economic redistribution with the practical needs of getting the money to preserve existing social programs and build new ones. We have ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Wolfgang Munchau writes that the rise of right-wing insurrectionism can be traced largely to “centre-left” parties who have focused most of their attention on imposing austerity and catering to the corporate sector while offering little to citizens, while Naomi Klein comments on the role of neoliberal politics ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Peter Fleming writes that the promise of entrepreneurial self-employment has given way to the nightmare of systematic precarious work: (T)he move to reclassify people as self-employed follows a very simple formula: it helps reduce labour costs and maximise profits for businesses that would rather use contractors than a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Alex Himelfarb discusses why a proportional electoral system can be expected to produce better and more representative public policy: The adversarial approach often means major policy lurches when the government changes. For example, the Harper government undid some important initiatives of the previous government, including the Kelowna Accord, ...