Montreal Simon: Gord Downie and the Spirit of Chanie Wenjack

Like everybody else I knew Gord Downie was dying, from an aggressive form of brain cancer that grows fast and spreads quickly.But I was amazed at how long he lasted before death finally claimed him.I was impressed by all the things he managed to do in the time he had left.And nothing moved me more than this.Read ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Ed Finn discusses how corporate giants exert far more influence than we generally know – or should be willing to accept. And Joseph Schwartz and Bhaskar Sunkara comment on the difficulty in achieving durable social-democratic policies while economic power is concentrated in the corporate elite. – Thomas ...

Alberta Politics: The Week in Review: We know where the Wildrosers are, but where’s Jason?

ILLUSTRATIONS: Where’s Jason? If anyone spots PC Leader Jason Kenney, who doesn’t have to show up in the Legislature because he’s not an MLA, please let a responsible grownup know. Below: Education Minister David Eggen and Opposition Leader Brian Jean. There’s no doubt about where Mr. Jean will be found, although there’s some question about ...

Montreal Simon: Chanie Wenjack, Gord Downie, and the Secret Path

I never heard the story of Chanie Wenjack, an Ojibway boy who lived in Northern Ontario, until today.And although it made me feel terribly sad, I'm glad I did.Because it couldn't be a more Canadian story, or a more powerful story of resistance. Even if it ended so tragically. Read more »

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Rachel West charts how higher wages and improved social supports can reduce crime rates and their resulting costs. – Lana Payne comments on the glass ceiling still limiting the wages and opportunities available to women in the workplace. And Stephanie Langton highlights how a combination of student loan ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: Apologise for what? #nlpoli #cdnpoli

The Government of Canada never operated a single residential school for aboriginal people in Newfoundland and Labrador. Not one. That’s why aboriginal people in this province weren’t included in the settlement of the class action lawsuit several years ago and why they were excluded from the apology that went with the settlement. The  recent settlement ...

The Canadian Progressive: Canada’s progress shows indigenous reconciliation is a long-term process

Australia, which is “being held back by its unresolved relationship with its Indigenous population”, can learn from Canada’s emerging efforts at reconciliation with First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples. The post Canada’s progress shows indigenous reconciliation is a long-term process appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – The BBC reports that even UK business groups are acknowledging that excessive executive pay is leading to public concern and distrust in the state of the economy. And Alex Hern notes that Steve Wozniak for one isn’t shy to point out the need for Apple and other corporations ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: A simple question about residential schools #nlpoli

According to one of the firms involved in the class action suit by residents of Newfoundland and Labrador about residential schools: Five separate actions were commenced alleging that former residents of five IRS [Indian Residential Schools] in Newfoundlandand Labrador, operated by the Canadian Government, were neglected, sexually and physically abused.  It is alleged that the ...

Susan on the Soapbox: Bishop Henry Pontificates on Gay Straight Alliances

On January 13, 2016 The Most Reverend Frederick Bernard Henry, the seventh Catholic Bishop of the diocese of Calgary well and truly lost it. Henry wrote a pastoral letter denouncing Education Minister David Eggen’s “edict” that public, Catholic, French and charter school boards must support LBTQ students who wish to form gay-straight alliances (GSAs) and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Patrick Flavin studies (PDF) the direct benefits that flow from giving people secure access to health care. And Daphne Bramham writes that the damage done by child poverty can be directly observed in educational outcomes: Anyone who questions whether child poverty is real in British Columbia should ...

The Canadian Progressive: Recommendations from the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

Today, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada released its Final Report on the human rights violations perpetrated through the aboriginal residential school policy. Here are a few of the TRC’s 94 recommendations. The post Recommendations from the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Dead Wild Roses: Canada Day – Something To Be Proud Of.

 “Patriotism assumes that our globe is divided into little spots, each one surrounded by an iron gate. Those who have had the fortune of being born on some particular spot, consider themselves better, nobler, grander, more intelligent than the living beings inhabiting any other spot. It is, therefore, the duty of everyone living on that ...

Alberta Politics: Rachel Notley offers a dignified argument for healing and acknowledgement of past wrongs against First Nations citizens

PHOTOS: The damage done by residential schools is part of every Canadian’s legacy and the sooner we acknowledge that, the better off we all will be. Below: Alberta Premier Rachel Notley, B.C. Premier Christy Cark, singer Raffi Cavoukian, Opposition Leader Brian Jean and Tory MLA Sandra Jansen. VICTORIA, B.C. From the vantage point of the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Chris Mooney takes a look at the positive side of social influences on behaviour, as new research shows a correlation between spending time with neighbours and an interest in the environmental issues which affect us all. But Adam Stoneman documents how another form of social interaction – that ...

Bill Longstaff: The TRC report and the Langevin Bridge—what’s in a name?

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s report has issued a damning condemnation of the Indian residential schools, referring to their history as “cultural genocide.” Reverberations are being felt across the country, including here in Calgary. For example, a question has risen about the Langevin Bridge and Langevin School, and whether or not they should be renamed. ...

Cowichan Conversations: CBC-Truth and Reconciliation Commission Findings Must Be Acted Upon, Aboriginal Student Says

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission is out, many of us have welcomed the report, its’ findings, and its opportunity to face but not accept the incomprehensible abuse that native families and children experienced in residential Read more…

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how we should expect our leaders to respond to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s report on residential schools – and what we’ve seen from the Cons instead. For further reading…– PressProgress offers the video of Bernard Valcourt sticking out like a sore thumb in his refusal to consider missing and murdered indigenous women ...

Montreal Simon: Truth, Reconciliation, and the Shame of the Con Regime

They are images that should haunt every Canadian. Native children taken away from the parents by the RCMP and sent to residential schools with more cemeteries than playgrounds.And even though our generation wasn't to blame for that story of brutality and attempted cultural genocide, we can't look away or ignore the problem.Because it is still an open ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Jim Stanford points out how the corporate tax pendulum is swinging back toward asking business to make an equitable contribution to Canadian society: The federal rate was cut virtually in half after 2000 (to just 15 per cent today). Several provincial governments followed suit. Alberta was the ...

Art Threat: Painting, Resisting, Giggling: An Interview with George Littlechild

I first stumbled upon George Littlechild’s art at the Comox Valley Art Gallery in my hometown of Courtenay, British Columbia. After reeling from the emotional turmoil and historical reopening, rapprochement and reordering rendered in his bold and colourful brush strokes and integration of collage through archives, I was delighted further to learn that Littlechild resided ...

Art Threat: Contest: Win swag from Rhymes for Young Ghouls!

Rhymes for Young Ghouls, the debut feature film by Canadian director Jeff Barnaby that garnered well-deserved praise on the film festival circuit this year, including a top ten film nod from TIFF, is opening this month at theatres in Canada’s three largest cities. The movie is currently screening in Toronto at Cineplex (Younge & Dundas) ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Frances Russell rightly asks whose freedom is supposed to be protected by free trade agreements such as CETA: Once Canada signs CETA (the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement) with Europe, federal, provincial and municipal governments will suddenly find their hands and feet tied. Suddenly, they will experience ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Simon Lewchuk makes the case for genuine participatory budgeting in contrast to the little-known and unduly-narrow means for Canadians to even make suggestions for our country’s public spending priorities: Operating under the guise of “consultation,” in June the federal finance committee announced its annual pre-budget process (don’t ...

The Canadian Progressive: Hungry Aboriginal kids used in nutritional experiments: AFN reacts

The Assembly of First Nations (AFN) says the revelation that Canadian officials used malnourished Aboriginal populations in nutritional experiments has “sent a shockwave through First Nations in Canada and should be no less shocking to all Canadians and beyond.” The post Hungry Aboriginal kids used in nutritional experiments: AFN reacts appeared first on The Canadian ...