Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Kevin McKean discusses how inequality undermines the goal of ensuring a healthy population. Matt Bruenig examines new data showing that the concentration of wealth in the U.S. is getting more extreme by the year. Steven Pearlstein writes about new polling showing that the U.S. public strongly favours ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Naomi Klein examines how climate change has contributed to a summer of extreme weather disasters, while David Suzuki highlights how we can work with nature to respond to increased flooding. And Emily Atkin discusses the outsized damage 90 corporate behemoths have done to our climate. – Meanwhile, Abacus ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Amira Elghawaby comments on the loss of empathy in Canadian politics – particularly due to a disproportionate focus on the perceived self-interest of a narrow group of upper-middle-class swing voters, rather than speaking to and about the people with the greatest need for collective voice: A few ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Noah Smith offers a reminder that market principles don’t work for everything. And Amelie Quesnel-Vallee and Miles Taylor note that in the health sector in particular, the use of private providers to supplement an underfunded public system is leading to inequitable disparities in accessibility. – Andrew Jackson challenges ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Diane Cardwell points out how carbon politics are threatening renewable energy just at the point where it would win a fair fight against fossil fuels. And J. David Hughes finds that any case for Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline falls apart in the face of realistic assumptions about ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2017 Links

The latest from the NDP’s federal leadership campaign. – The Canadian Press reports on Pat Stogran’s official campaign launch. And Alex Ballingall highlights Stogran’s criticism of Justin Trudeau’s empty-suit governance, while Jeremy Nuttall focuses on his message about challenging politics as usual. – Charlie Smith interviews Peter Julian about his “just transition” energy policy and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Abi Wilkinson writes about the importance of making social benefits universal in order to reflect a sense of shared interests and purpose: Universal aspects of the welfare state tend to be thought of as the fruit of common endeavour. The NHS tops the list of things that ...

Montreal Simon: Donald Trump’s Insane War on Wind Turbines

Of all the horrible things Donald Trump is threatening to do, and there are so many, his promise to end the war against climate change is the worst.For there is no greater threat to the future of humanity, and his claim that climate change is a hoax is not just wrong, it's insane.And if you want to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Vincent Bevins interviews Branko Milanovic about the economic roots of the working-class revolt against neoliberalism, while pointing out that there’s nothing inevitable about globalization harming large numbers of people in the developed world: Let’s start with the obvious question. Does the elephant graph explain Brexit and Trump?  Yes, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Thomas Piketty discusses our choice between developing models of global trade which actually produce positive results for people, or fueling the fire of Trump-style demogoguery: The main lesson for Europe and the world is clear: as a matter of urgency, globalization must be fundamentally re-oriented. The main challenges ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – In The Public Interest studies how the privatization of services leads to increased inequality: In the Public Interest’s analysis of recent government contracting identifies five ways in which government privatization disproportionately hurts poor individuals and families… Creation of new user fees: The creation of new user fees to ...

Montreal Simon: Scottish Independence and Some Lessons For Alberta

Last Sunday was the second anniversary of Scotland's independence referendum, which as you may know, was for me a day of great disappointment.And one I'll always remember.But I haven't dared even mention the anniversary when talking to my family in the Scottish highlands, because for them it's a day best forgotten.They don't want to talk about it. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Arthur Neslen points out how new trade agreements figure to make it impossible for governments to meet their environmental commitments. And Corporate Europe Observatory highlights how the CETA will give investors the ability to dictate public policy. – The Economist discusses the effect of high executive compensation ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here (via PressReader), on how the North Saskatchewan River oil spill may not lead directly to a needed reevaluation of the risks of pipelines – but a public expectation that we’ll shift away from dirty energy may be more significant in the long run. For further reading…– I’ve previously posted about Brad Wall’s response to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Lana Payne comments on the combination of low wages and nonexistent security attached to jobs for younger workers. And Catherine Baab-Muguira examines the spread of the side hustle economy as a means of bare survival. – Roderick Benns discusses how the isolation of remote communities represents a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Mary O’Hara reviews Daniel Hatcher’s new book on the U.S.’ poverty industry which seeks to exploit public supports for private gain: (A) new book published last week by law professor and advocate Daniel L Hatcher, The Poverty Industry: The Exploitation of America’s Most Vulnerable Citizens, exposes a largely ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Noah Zon points out that while it’s impossible to avoid rhetoric about eliminating “red tape” for businesses, we’ve seen gratuitous barriers put in place to prevent people from accessing needed public support: It’s a good principle to make interacting with government as easy as possible. For example ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Phillipe Orliange discusses the significance of inequality in the developing world as a problem for both fairness and economic development: The question of inequality has become so important because societal cohesion broadly depends upon it. It is not normal for 1% of the population to possess as much ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Rafael Gomez and Juan Gomez offer a look at the state of Canadian workplace democracy, as well as some useful proposals to improve it. – The New York Times editorial board points out how the U.S.’ temporary worker programs are predictably being abused by employers to lower ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Christopher Jencks discusses why the U.S.’ poor are only getting poorer (in part due to the misapprehension that social programs aren’t available) in reviewing Kathryn Edin and Luke Shaefer’s $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America: In $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Nick Dearden discusses how the latest wave of corporate power agreements – including the CETA – stands to undermine democracy in participating countries: Like the US deal, Ceta contains a new legal system, open only to foreign corporations and investors. Should the British government make a decision, say, ...

The Canadian Progressive: “Top 7 Reasons You Can’t Trust Kinder Morgan”, Pipelines

A new report outlines the “Top 7 Reasons You Can’t Trust Kinder Morgan” and the energy giant’s proposed $5.4 billion Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project. The post “Top 7 Reasons You Can’t Trust Kinder Morgan”, Pipelines appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Robert Frank discusses the essential role of luck in determining the opportunities we have – and how the advantages of a strong social fabric are too often ignored by the people who benefit the most from them: (C)hance plays a far larger role in life outcomes than most ...

daveberta.ca – Alberta Politics: Oil Sands workers call for training in Renewable Energy

A group of oil sands workers are calling on the Alberta government to support the training of 1,000 out of work electricians as solar specialists. With plans to facilitate the registration of those 1,000 training candidates, the Iron & Earth company is proposing the installation of solar panels… Continue Reading →

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Paul Krugman writes that we’re far closer to a major energy transformation than many people realize – but that public policy decisions in the next few years may make all the difference in determining whether it materializes: According to a recent report by the investment firm Lazard, the ...