Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Ian Welsh neatly summarizes the rules needed to ensure that capitalism doesn’t drown out social good: Capitalism, as it works, destroys itself in a number of ways. For capitalism to work, it must be prevented from doing so: it must not be allowed to form unregulated monopolies ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Matt Bruenig examines who is living in poverty in the U.S. – and how policy choices result in many people who can’t feasibly earn wages being stuck below the poverty line: (C)hildren, elderly, disabled people, and students make up around 70 percent of the poor. If you ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ben Steverman examines the unfairness of the U.S.’ tax system – which, like Canada’s, offers gratuitous giveaways to wealthy investors which force workers to pay more: Politicians have intentionally set tax rates on wages much higher than those on long-term investment returns. The U.S. has a progressive tax ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Rachel Sherman writes about the steps taken by wealthy Americans to hide how much they spend to paper over income inequality: Over lunch in a downtown restaurant, Beatrice, a New Yorker in her late 30s, told me about two decisions she and her husband were considering. They were ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Alex Himelfarb writes about the need to expand our idea of what’s possible through collective action: Is Trump the product of over forty years of attacks on the very idea of government, of decades in which government seemed to back away from our lives, when the best it ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – David Sirota talks to Naomi Klein about the push by right-wing politicians and corporate media outlets alike to stifle any discussion of how fossil fuels contribute to the climate change fuelling Hurricane Harvey. Matt Taibbi laments how the media contributed to the development of a public so ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Lana Payne writes that austerity bears much of the blame for the Grenfell Tower inferno – as well as for the increased dangers facing all but the wealthiest of people: Grenfell Tower was not an accident. It is what happens when austerity becomes entrenched government ideology. Grenfell ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how a misguided war against “red tape” contributed to the deaths of dozens in the Grenfell Tower fire – and how we’re at risk of becoming casualties as well. For further reading…– Details about the UK’s obsession with red tape can be found in archives including the home page and housing and construction ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Barbara Ellen questions the positive spin the right tries to put on poverty and precarity, and writes that we’re all worse off forcing people to just barely get by: In recent times, there has been a lot said about those people who are “just managing”. They are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Frances Ryan discusses the precarity facing far too many UK residents who are a single missed bill payment away from financial disaster: There are now 19 million people in this country living below the minimum income standard (an income required for what the wider public view as ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Frances Ryan discusses the precarity facing far too many UK residents who are a single missed bill payment away from financial disaster: There are now 19 million people in this country living below the minimum income standard (an income required for what the wider public view as ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content for your Friday reading. – Aditya Chakrabortty writes about the devastating combination of an urgent need for collective action on the key issues we face, and a deeply-entrenched political aversion to anything of the sort. And Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett highlight how the UK Cons are going out of their way to ...

Alberta Politics: RCMP turn a blind eye to abandoned firearms in Fort Mac – manna to the gun lobby but a worry to the rest of us

PHOTO: RCMP officers like these in High River during the flooding to 2013 were subjected to a vicious campaign of vilification by some Alberta gun enthusiasts for seizing abandoned weapons in the Southern Alberta town (CBC photo). QUEBEC CITY We know firearms are dangerous – especially when they’re not in the hands of so-called “law-abiding ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Hugh MacKenzie reminds us how quickly Canada’s richest CEOs will exceed the income of the average Canadian worker on the year’s first work day. And James Surowiecki takes a look at how the U.S.’ corporate sector is fleeing any social obligations by sending profits offshore.  – Stephen Kimber ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Paul Krugman reviews Robert Reich’s upcoming book, with a particular focus on the connection between corporate power and growing inequality: …Reich makes a very good case that widening inequality largely reflects political decisions that could have gone in very different directions. The rise in market power reflects a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Louis-Philippe Rochon explains how higher taxes on the wealthy can be no less a boon for the economy than for the goal of social equality: In fact, empirical analysis shows that while the relationship between higher taxes and economic growth is complex, there is no proof that ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: Crossing Topsail Road #nlpoli

A new high school has put the better part of a thousand young people on Topsail Road opposite a raft of fast food outlets and a major mall. Young people will cross Topsail Road, a four–lane major thoroughfare in St. John’s.  it is dangerous.  Things will get more dangerous.  City council is thinking about building ...

Accidental Deliberations: On know-nothings

Shorter Lisa Raitt: Now that I think about it, somebody should probably be responsible for regulating vehicle safety. (aide whispers in ear) Wait, that’s me? Why is this the first I’ve heard of it?

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Brendan O’Neill writes that the UK Cons are following in Stephen Harper’s footsteps by pushing the concept of thought policing. And George Monbiot rightly criticizes the gross inflation of supposed terror threats and simultaneous neglect of far more serious risks: A global survey published last week by ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Adrian Morrow reports on Al Gore’s explanation as to how the fight against climate change can be economically as well as environmentally beneficial, while CTV points out a new Nanos poll showing that Canadians largely agree with the view that cleaner technology can and should replace dirty ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – The Broadbent Institute details Rhys Kesselman’s research on how the Cons’ expanded TFSAs are nothing but a giveaway to the wealthy. And Dean Beeby reports on their withholding of EI supplements from the families who most need them – paired with a complete lack of responsibility or ...

Accidental Deliberations: On delay tactics

Following up on this post, let’s look in a bit more detail as to how the Cons might try to make excuses for a delay in this fall’s expected federal election – and why they might be happy to use the more questionable means to do so. As noted in the previous post, the fixed ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Emmanuel Saez examines the U.S.’ latest income inequality numbers and finds that the gap between the wealthy few and everybody else is still growing. The Equality Trust finds that the UK’s tax system is already conspicuously regressive even as the Cameron Cons plan to make it more so. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Jeff Spross argues that in addition to ensuring that employees are fairly paid for the overtime hours they work, we should also be pushing to ensure people aren’t required to work as much to begin with. And Angella MacEwen points out that any spin about increasing wages ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Genevieve LeBaron, Johanna Montgomerie, and Daniela Tepe-Belfrage write that inequality is getting worse in the UK based on class, gender and all kinds of other grounds, while a supposed “recovery” isn’t benefiting anybody except the people who least need it: (E)conomic policies associated with ‘recovery’ in the ...