Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Noah Zon points out that while it’s impossible to avoid rhetoric about eliminating “red tape” for businesses, we’ve seen gratuitous barriers put in place to prevent people from accessing needed public support: It’s a good principle to make interacting with government as easy as possible. For example ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Albert van Senvoort points out that poverty is more difficult to escape in Canada today than it was two decades ago. And Jean Swanson discusses the desperate need for more action from all levels of government to ensure the right to housing is met in British Columbia. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Oxfam points out the latest World Wealth Report showing that extreme inequality and wealth continue to grow around the globe. And AFP reports on the IMF’s warnings that inequality and poverty represent significant dangers for the U.S. economy. – Kim Moody writes about the state of the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Paul Willcocks discusses British Columbia’s two-tiered education system and the role it plays in exacerbating inequality – which is well worth keeping in mind as Saskatchewan deals with the fallout from the Wall government’s refusal to fund public schools. And Charlie Smith reviews Andrew MacLeod’s A Better Place ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Brian Nolan, Max Roser, and Stefan Thewissen study (PDF) the relationship between GDP and household income across the OECD, and find a nearly universal pattern of nominal economic growth which isn’t finding its way into households (which is particularly extreme in the U.S.). Roy van der Weide, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Rafael Gomez and Juan Gomez offer a look at the state of Canadian workplace democracy, as well as some useful proposals to improve it. – The New York Times editorial board points out how the U.S.’ temporary worker programs are predictably being abused by employers to lower ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Louis-Philippe Rochon reminds us why even if we were to (pointlessly) prioritize raw GDP over fair distributions of income and wealth, inequality is bad for economic growth in general: The more we redistribute income and wealth, the more consumption increases, which then increases demand. In turn, this should ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Lisa Phillips writes about the desperate need for Canadian courts to ensure a fair tax system, rather than allowing technicalities and loopholes to win out over the principle that everybody should pay a fair share: With some exceptions, Canadian judges have defaulted to a literal reading of ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here (via PressReader), on the Wall government’s move to push poor Saskatchewan residents into social programs with counterproductive work requirements. For further reading…– Again, Betty Ann Adam reported here on the changes to social assistance in Saskatchewan’s budget. Pamela Cowan highlighted the damage to health care, including through cuts to prescription drug funding and a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your wek. – Maia Szalavitz discusses the connection between unemployment, inequality and addictions, noting in particular that uncertainty and stress in other areas of an individual’s life make addition recovery far more difficult: The relationship between addiction rates and inequality has long been noted by researchers who study its health effects: ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Christopher Jencks discusses why the U.S.’ poor are only getting poorer (in part due to the misapprehension that social programs aren’t available) in reviewing Kathryn Edin and Luke Shaefer’s $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America: In $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in ...

Montreal Simon: The Redneck Con Larry Miller Disgraces Himself Again

The next time you hear Rona Ambrose call her zombie party the new/nouveau Cons,  send her a message with just two words in it: Larry Miller.Because O'l Larry is still there, he couldn't be more Reform or more redneck.He's still the "Keeper of the Flame" (more on that later.)And he's just made a beast out of himself again.Read ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Caroline Plante reports on Quebec’s scourge of medical extra-billing and user fees (as identified by its own Auditor General). And Aaron Derfel notes that the federal government has done nothing to apply the Canada Health Act to rein in the practice. – Erika Shaker highlights how federal funding ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Robert Frank examines how market outcomes are shaped disproportionately by luck rather than significant differences in merit: (W)ith each extension of the highway, rail, and canal systems, shipping costs fell sharply, and at each step production became more concentrated…It’s of course a good thing that their superior ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – David Rosen discusses the connection between poverty and more general social exclusion: Poverty is a form of social powerlessness.  The poorer you are, the weaker you are, the harder your life; everything is about survival.  Poverty can be analyzed in two complementary ways – who and where.  By ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jim Dwyer writes about the cumulative effect a childhood in poverty has on individual development. And Lee Elliot Major calls out the self-perpetuating exclusion set up by the wealthy to preserve their privilege: A survey found that the ‘Bank of Mum and Dad’ now helps to finance ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, contrasting Brad Wall’s giveaway of public money to subsidize take-out meals against his choice to make healthy food less accessible to the people who need it most in Saskatoon’s inner city. For further reading…– The Star-Phoenix reported on the history of Station 20 West, as well as the public backlash against the Saskatchewan Party’s ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Ten things to know about the 2016-17 Alberta budget

Over at the web site of the Calgary Homeless Foundation, I have a blog post titled: “Ten things to know about the 2016-17 Alberta budget.” The link to the post is here.

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Harry Leslie Smith writes about how an increasingly polarized city such as London excludes a large number of its citizens from meaningful social participation: (A)usterity has diminished the opportunity of the young and shortened the lives of the old. Even libraries – the life blood of any ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Ed Broadbent, Michal Hay and Emilie Nicolas theorize that Canada’s left is on the rise. Matt Karp takes a look at the policy preferences of younger American voters, including a strong willingness to fund far better social programs than are currently available. And N+1 responds to the rise ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones argues that public policy and social activism are needed to rein in the excesses of a corporate class which sees it as its job to extract every possible dollar from the society around it: A financial elite plunged the country into calamity and effectively got ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Aditya Chakrabortty comments on how massive amounts of wealth are both being siphoned out of our social systems, and used to buy the politicians who facilitate those transfers: (A)t root, the Panama Papers are not about tax. They’re not even about money. What the Panama Papers really depict ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – The Ontario Association of Food Banks discusses the long-term damage done by childhood poverty and deprivation: When facing a very tight budget, food is often the budget line that gets cut in order to afford rent or hydro: you can skip a meal for a day or two ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Using Data to End Homelessness in Calgary

Over at the web site of the Calgary Homeless Foundation, I’ve written a blog post titled “Using Data to End Homelessness in Calgary.” The link to the English version is here; the link to the French version here.

Michal Rozworski: Jonathan Kay advises the left

Jonathan Kay knows what’s hurting the poor. Is it absurdly low welfare rates and social supports? Perhaps it is lack of access to affordable housing? Poverty wages? Food insecurity? Over-policing? No, says Kay, the honest broker of politics, the inconvenient truth-speaker, it’s the left’s political correctness that’s really keeping the poor down. Kay supports this claim with a ...