Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – George Monbiot observes that while few people would want to drive animals to extinction directly, we’re all too often eager to settle for a consumerist culture which produces exactly that result. – Carol Linnitt reports on the Trudeau Libs’ appointment of an oil industry cheerleader to review the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Bill Moyers writes about the conflict between the wealthy few seeking to preserve their privilege, and the balance of society seeking fairness for everybody: I keep in my files a warning published in [The Economist] a dozen years ago, on the eve of George W. Bush’s second ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – David Dayen and Ryan Grim write that “free trade” agreements are in fact turning into little more than cash cows for hedge funds and other big-money speculators: Under this system, a corporation invested in a foreign country can appeal to arbitration panels, consisting of three corporate lawyers, if that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Don Pittis writes that it will take far more than words and sentiments to reverse the trend of growing income inequality. Elaine Power points out that Ontario’s social assistance programs – like those elsewhere – far fall short of meeting basic human needs. And Christopher Mackie reminds us ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Canada’s National Housing Strategy Consultations

Over at the web site of the Calgary Homeless Foundation, I’ve written a blog post about Canada’s National Housing Strategy consultations.  The link to the blog post is here. Points raised in the blog post include the following: -In Canada, public social spending as a percentage of our GDP is well below the OECD average. ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Federal Income Support for Low-Income Seniors

Over at the Behind the Numbers web site, Allan Moscovitch, David Macdonald and I have a blog post titled “Ten Things to Know About Federal Income Support for Low-Income Seniors in Canada.” The blog post argues—among other things—that if the age of eligibility for Old Age Security were to move from 65 to 67, the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Erika Hayasaki surveys the developing body of research on how poverty and deprivation affect a child’s long-term brain development: Early results show a troubling trend: Kids who grow up with higher levels of violence as a backdrop in their lives, based on MRI scans, have weaker real-time neural ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Erika Hayasaki surveys the developing body of research on how poverty and deprivation affect a child’s long-term brain development: Early results show a troubling trend: Kids who grow up with higher levels of violence as a backdrop in their lives, based on MRI scans, have weaker real-time neural ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Owen Jones discusses the importance of the labour movement in ensuring that workers can get ahead in life, rather than drowning in debt: Nights spent staring at the ceiling as worries dance manically around the brain. Taking a deep breath before opening the gas bill. Sacrificing a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ann McFeatters reminds us of the good a government can do when it dedicates itself to identifying and responding to urgent public needs. And Bill McKibben makes the case for an all-out mobilization against climate change: We’re used to war as metaphor: the war on poverty, the war ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Nora Loreto slams the Wynne Libs’ “red tape” gimmick, while highlighting the need for people to claim a voice in rules largely intended to protect them as workers and consumers: One person’s red tape is another person’s health and safety, but Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne hopes that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Branko Milanovic points out how the commodification of our interactions may create an incentive for short-term exploitation: Commodification of what was hitherto a non-commercial resource makes each of us do many jobs and even, as in the renting of apartments, capitalists. But saying that I work many jobs ...

PostArctica: Housing March, World Social Forum, Montreal, 2016

Today, along with a few friends from the CACV in Verdun, we marched with numerous community housing groups from Cote des Neiges, Montreal, and across Quebec to the site of the former Blue Bonnets racetrack. The march was about raising awareness of the need for social housing, that it be considered an urgent priority locally, ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the Saskatchewan Party’s decision to try to make up for its gross mismanagement by squeezing benefits out of people with disabilities. For further reading…– This year’s provincial budget spin from the Ministry of Social Services is here, featuring the following: Government’s next steps on the Saskatchewan Disability Strategy will focus on the Where ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Yanis Varoufakis makes the case for an international progressive political system to ensure that social progress doesn’t stop at national borders: (T)raditional political parties are fading into irrelevance, supplanted by the emergence of two new political blocs. One bloc represents the old troika of liberalization, globalization, and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – David Blanchflower notes that there’s virtually no dispute that the UK is headed into an economic downturn – meaning that there’s also no excuse to hold off on fiscal relief for the public. And Brad DeLong points to a new study on the effectiveness of government spending in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Lucy Shaddock offers a response to the Institute for Fiscal Studies’ report on poverty and inequality in the UK, while McKinsey finds that hundreds of millions of people in advanced economies are seeing their real incomes stagnate or decline. And Mariana Mazzucato and Michael Jacobs provide their take ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Armine Yalnizyan points out the choice between a basic income and the provision of basic services, while making a strong case to focus on the latter: At the federal level, the cost of raising everyone’s income above the poverty line is an estimated $30 billion a year. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Aditya Chakrabortty sums up George Osborne’s legacy – and give or take a Brexit vote, it looks awfully familiar for corporatist governments in general: The multi-million-pound spending spree wasn’t justifiable, admitted Osborne, according to Laws’ recent memoir, Coalition. “It will only really be of help to stupid, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – France St-Hilaire, David Green and Craig Riddell offer some needed policy prescriptions to fight inequality in Canada: As first steps toward expanding the share of the economic pie going to workers, the minimum wage should be gradually increased to $15 and the Working Income Tax Benefit (WITB) significantly ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Trevor Hancock writes that if we’re going to designate anything as a public health emergency, poverty should top the list: I was pleased to see the B.C. Ministry of Health use the powers of the provincial health officer to designate opioid drug overdose deaths a public-health emergency. But ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Mark Karlin interviews Richard Wolff about the relationship between unfettered capitalism and poverty: How is poverty an inevitable by-product of capitalism? Doesn’t this make all these charitable drives “to eliminate poverty” disingenuous because it cannot be eliminated in a capitalistic system? Poverty has always accompanied capitalism (as Thomas Piketty’s ...

Alberta Politics: Albertans hear the same old same old as fast-food restaurant owners grow hysterical over minimum wage

PHOTOS: Alberta Labour Minister Christina Gray, who is sticking to her guns on the provincial government’s plans to raise the provincial minimum wage to $15 by 2018. Below: Notable fair wage campaigners, Joe Ceci, finance minister of Alberta; Franklin Delano Roosevelt, president of the United States; and Karl Marx, philosopher, economist and journalist. Fast-food restaurant ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Ed Finn discusses how to fight for needed alternatives to neoliberalism in the face of seemingly daunting odds and structural barriers. – Noah Smith points out how most economic analysis omits important social factors which ultimately matter far more to people than marginal GDP. And as a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Mary O’Hara reviews Daniel Hatcher’s new book on the U.S.’ poverty industry which seeks to exploit public supports for private gain: (A) new book published last week by law professor and advocate Daniel L Hatcher, The Poverty Industry: The Exploitation of America’s Most Vulnerable Citizens, exposes a largely ...