Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – David Sirota talks to Naomi Klein about the push by right-wing politicians and corporate media outlets alike to stifle any discussion of how fossil fuels contribute to the climate change fuelling Hurricane Harvey. Matt Taibbi laments how the media contributed to the development of a public so ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones calls out the dogmatic centre for first laying the groundwork for the rise of the populist right, then trying to vilify anybody working on a progressive alternative. And Chris Dillow zeroes in on what’s wrong with the neoliberal view of the world: – Insufficient scepticism ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2017 Links

The latest from the federal NDP leadership campaign as the August 17 membership deadline approaches. (And for those wondering, it’s possible to both check one’s membership status and sign up online.) – Kyle Duggan reports on a new Mainstreet poll showing Charlie Angus with a substantial lead among identified members – confirming where the candidates ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Josh Bivens notes that international trade deals have been structured to maximize the cost of globalization for the workers excluded from the bargaining table. And Jon Queally points out that a massive majority of Americans see power disproportionately hoarded by the rich at the expense of everybody else. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Larry Elliott is optimistic that the UK’s election result will lead to an end of destructive austerity. James Downie comments on the example Jeremy Corbyn’s campaign provides for progressives in the U.S. (and elsewhere). And Karl Nerenberg writes about the importance of youth turnout in boosting Labour’s fortunes. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Derrick O’Keefe highlights why British Columbia’s voters should be careful before lending any credence to the corporate media’s call for yet another term of corrupt Lib government: As expected, The Vancouver Sun and Province, and the Globe and Mail, published editorials urging voters to keep the Liberals ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Owen Jones writes that excessive reliance on corporate profiteers is the reason why the UK’s trains don’t run on time. And Nora Loreto argues that postal banking is needed (among other reasons) to rein in abuses by Canada’s biggest banks. – Shannon Daub examines what British Columbia’s voters ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Rutger Bregman writes that the most extreme wealth in our economy is based on rents rather than productivity: In reality, it is the waste collectors, the nurses, and the cleaners whose shoulders are supporting the apex of the pyramid. They are the true mechanism of social solidarity. Meanwhile, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2017 Links

A few notes worth a look in advance of today’s youth-focused debate… – Kyle Duggan reports on Pat Stogran’s imminent entry into the race. And The View Up Here features an extended interview to introduce Stogran as a candidate, while CTV offers a shorter interview. – Anishinabek News examines Charlie Angus’ focus on First Nations ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Jordy Cummings exposes the shady side of Justin Trudeau’s shin persona. Dimitri Lascaris interviews Nora Loreto about Canada’s relationship with the U.S. And Michal Rozworski challenges Trudeau’s decision to serve as a prop for Donald Trump rather than defending Canadian values: The point to remember is that there would ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Wolfgang Munchau writes that the rise of right-wing insurrectionism can be traced largely to “centre-left” parties who have focused most of their attention on imposing austerity and catering to the corporate sector while offering little to citizens, while Naomi Klein comments on the role of neoliberal politics ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Andrew Jackson writes that the Libs’ fall economic statement represents a massive (and unjustified) shift away from promised infrastructure funding even while planning to privatize both existing operations and future developments. And Joie Warnock highlights why it would represent nothing short of scandalous mismanagement for the Wall ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Ben Casselman points out how corporate consolidation can produce harmful results for consumers and workers alike. Guy Standing discusses how we’re all worse off for the spread of rentier capitalism. And Mariana Mazzucato reminds us that an entrepreneurial government is a must if we want to see general ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Jake Kivanc points out that what little job growth Canada can claim primarily involves precarious work. And Nora Loreto discusses the crucial link between labour and social change: (T)o confront climate change, we must imagine the role of workers in the transition to an oil-free economy: how ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Saqib Bhatti and Stephen Lerner point out that the struggle for power between labour and capital is far from over, and that the next step may be to engage on wider questions of economic control: For too long most unions defined their mission narrowly as winning higher ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Nora Loreto slams the Wynne Libs’ “red tape” gimmick, while highlighting the need for people to claim a voice in rules largely intended to protect them as workers and consumers: One person’s red tape is another person’s health and safety, but Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne hopes that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Nicholas Kristof points out how important a stable and effective public service looks from the standpoint of a country which doesn’t benefit from one. And Chi Onwurah discusses how the UK Cons – like their right-wing brethren elsewhere – are determined to move in the wrong direction: ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Duncan Brown discusses the connection between precarious work and low productivity. And Sara Mojtehedzadeh examines how Ontario’s workers’ compensation system is pushing injured individuals into grinding poverty by setting impossible requirements for claimants. – Jim Balsillie worries that the Trans-Pacific Partnership will only increase the tendency of profits ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jordan Brennan studies the relationship between corporate taxes and the economy, and finds that the promise of growth in exchange for corporate giveaways has proven entirely illusory. – Andy McSmith looks at another of the consequences of the trend toward corporate control, as the UK has seen the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Mariana Mazzucato discusses the futility of slashing government without paying attention to what it’s intended to accomplish. And Sheila Block and Kaylie Tiessen are particularly critical of Ontario’s short-term sell-offs which figure to harm public services and revenues alike in the long run: The sale of Hydro One ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Michael Hurley and Sam Gindin discuss the need for workers to organize to reverse the trend of precarious work, while the Star recognizes that the work is already well underway. PressProgress highlights the benefits of joining a union, while Tom Sandborn offers a to-do list for people ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Andrew Jackson writes that the Cons have gone out of their way to destroy the federal government’s capacity to improve the lives of Canadians: When the Harper government took office, federal tax revenues (2006-07 fiscal year) were 13.5% of GDP, a bit shy of the 14.5% peak in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Sherri Torjman comments on the importance of social policy among our political choices, while lamenting its absence from the first leaders’ debate: (M)arket economies go through cycles, with periods of stability followed by periods of slump and uncertainty. Canada has weathered these economic cycles, and even major ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Nora Loreto rightly challenges the instinct to respond to tragedy with blame in the name of “responsibility”, rather than compassion in the interest of making matters better: Blame is the projection of grief, sadness or fear. It is the projection of our own inadequacies; of our own ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Paul Kershaw examines political parties’ child care plans past and present, and finds the NDP’s new proposal to achieve better results at a lower cost. The Star’s editorial board weighs in on the desperate need for an improved child care system, while PressProgress focuses on the economic benefits. ...