Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Matt Bruenig explores the U.S.’ wealth inequality and finds a similarly skewed distribution of wealth among all kinds of demographic subgroups. And Robert Reich discusses why the attempt to sell a tax cut for billionaires as doing anything but making that problem worse is nothing short of laughable. ...

Babel-on-the-Bay: Trump stands steadfast, Justin.

Prime Minister Trudeau dropped in to the White House to see President Trump the other day. It is likely that two minutes after Trudeau left the Oval Office, Donald Trump had forgotten what they had said. It is not just that the man has a short attention span but he has absolutely no interest in ...

Montreal Simon: The Scary Unravelling of Donald Trump

I don't know how Justin Trudeau managed to look so cool yesterday, when confronted with the madness of Donald Trump.And the threat that could cost Canadians hundreds of thousands of jobs, and maybe even bring down the global economy.Or what he must have thought when he heard this: But then I read this tweet and ...

Montreal Simon: Trudeau, Trump, and the Ghastly Margaret Wente

As you may know, Justin Trudeau is going to meet with Donald Trump this week to fight for the future of NAFTA. And try to hold back a tidal wave of protectionism. And since hundreds of thousands of jobs in this country hang in the balance, you might expect that most Canadians would wish him luck.But no, ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Stephen Clarkson: An Introduction to a special blog series

Stephen Clarkson: Political Economist with a Global Vision (1937 – 2016) Marjorie Griffin Cohen and Daniel Drache Stephen Clarkson died early in 2016 in Freiburg, Germany and Canada lost someone very special. Stephen was a Professor in Political Science at the University of Toronto and engaged in teaching, research and writing until his death. He ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Michael Paarlberg discusses how the ratchet effect is making American health care far more durable than Republicans may have realized – while recognizing that there’s a lesson to be drawn for the design of other social programs as to the value of a broad constituency of support. – ...

The Canadian Progressive: Canada Pushes Back Against U.S. Copyright Demands in NAFTA

The third round of negotiations over the modernization of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) kicked off in Ottawa on last week. Jeremy Malcolm, the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s expert on the international dimensions of issues such as intellectual property, network neutrality, Internet governance, and trade, explains how Canada is pushing back against U.S. copyright ...

The Canadian Progressive: Canada Pushes Back Against U.S. Copyright Demands in NAFTA

The third round of negotiations over the modernization of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) kicked off in Ottawa on last week. Jeremy Malcolm, the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s expert on the international dimensions of issues such as intellectual property, network neutrality, Internet governance, and trade, explains how Canada is pushing back against U.S. copyright ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Stephanie Blankenburg and Richard Kozul-Wright comment on the rise of rent-seeking as a driver of stagnation and inequality. And George Monbiot argues that we shouldn’t let our common wealth be used for the sole benefit of a privileged few: A true commons is managed not for the accumulation ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – The Oxford Martin School has published a new report on the spread of inequality. And Noah Smith discusses the role of offshoring along with automation in stacking the economic deck against workers. – Meanwhile, Mike Blanchfield reports on the U.S.’ refusal to allow workers to participate in any ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Matt Bruenig examines who is living in poverty in the U.S. – and how policy choices result in many people who can’t feasibly earn wages being stuck below the poverty line: (C)hildren, elderly, disabled people, and students make up around 70 percent of the poor. If you ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Phillip Inman reports on a new UN study (PDF) showing that the inequality caused by austerity results in particular harm to women who are forced to take on more unpaid labour. – David Sloan Wilson interviews Sigrun Aasland about the mix and balance of public and private development ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ben Steverman examines the unfairness of the U.S.’ tax system – which, like Canada’s, offers gratuitous giveaways to wealthy investors which force workers to pay more: Politicians have intentionally set tax rates on wages much higher than those on long-term investment returns. The U.S. has a progressive tax ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – George Monbiot offers his suggestion for a new political narrative to build a better world than the one currently dominated by neoliberalism: (B)y coming together to revive community life we, the heroes of this story, can break the vicious circle. Through invoking our capacity for togetherness and belonging, ...

Babel-on-the-Bay: How’s the kitchen coming Chrystia?

Though not sure if the analogy of NAFTA negotiations being like renovating a kitchen comes from Canada’s foreign minister, by now she would disown the quote anyway. After meetings in Washington and in Mexico City, it is obvious that the discussions of North America’s trade agreements are going nowhere. By the time the three amigo ...

Montreal Simon: Andrew Scheer and the Religious Extremists

It's hard to believe, it's so bizarre it boggles the mind. It's like Andrew Scheer is getting his marching orders straight from Donald Trump or his Godzilla.For it has only been a couple of weeks since him and his Cons tried to sabotage the NAFTA talks by taking the Khadr case to the U.S.And stabbing ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Matthew Hoffmann discusses the reality that addressing climate change will require substantial changes to how we currently live – but that we don’t have a reasonable choice but to put in the work to make the transition. – Michael Wolfson writes that the Libs’ plans to limit ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ben Chu reports on a new study showing that the UK’s economy is broken in failing to translate GDP gains into any help for workers whose wages are falling. And the Canadian Press reports on the latest survey showing how many Canadians are just barely getting by in ...

Montreal Simon: Why Andrew Scheer and His Cons Have No Future

Ever since Andrew Scheer was chosen as the new leader of the Harper Party, I've been trying to explain to the few Cons I know, that they've made a terrible mistake. Trying to explain that by choosing a religious fanatic who would criminalize women, marginalize gays, and ignore climate change, they haven't just lost the next ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Ed Finn discusses how corporate giants exert far more influence than we generally know – or should be willing to accept. And Joseph Schwartz and Bhaskar Sunkara comment on the difficulty in achieving durable social-democratic policies while economic power is concentrated in the corporate elite. – Thomas ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Sarah Anderson studies how corporate tax cuts enrich CEOs, but don’t do anything to help workers. And she then follows up with this op-ed: If claims about the job-creation benefits of lower tax rates had any validity, these 92 consistently profitable firms would be among the nation’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Abigail McKnight and Richard Reeves write about the gilded floor that prevents the wealthy from facing the realities lived by most people. Eric Levitz discusses how the Trump economy is producing plenty for the ultra-rich, but little but mediocrity for everybody else. And Michelle Styczynski points out that ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, asking why Justin Trudeau and Gerald Butts are so willing to offer political cover to the Trump administration (including the now-departed Steve Bannon). For further reading…– Ryan Lizza’s report on Bannon’s relationship with Butts is here. And Adam Radwanski had previously reported on the Libs’ strategy of cultivating relationships with Trump’s associates before commenting ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Danny Dorling wonders whether we’ve finally reached the point of shifting toward greater income equality, while noting the uncertainty in trying to assess pay ratios. – Kevin Carmichael discusses how homeownership is getting pushed further and further out of the reach of young Canadian workers. And Edgardo ...

Babel-on-the-Bay: Justin Trudeau doesn’t have the chops.

It is often amusing when Canadian writers try to compare Prime Minister Trudeau with American President Trump. They seem to think that Justin Trudeau has been understudying for his current role all his life, while Donald Trump is an accidental politician and is only now learning that the job requires some serious time and attention. ...