Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Maureen Conway and Mark Popovich argue that something has gone severely wrong if (as seems to be the case) Wall Street is treating higher wages as bad news: In 2017, America has a jobs problem: It’s not that we don’t have enough jobs, but that we don’t have ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the importance of governments matching their talk about enforcing tax law with action – and the reason for concern that the Libs are headed in the opposite direction. For further reading…– Harvey Cashore, Nicole Percy, Nicole McCormick and Patrick Butler reported here on Colin Campbell’s participation in a KPMG-sponsored tax conference while chairing ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Tom Parkin writes about the growing opposition to a Lib infrastructure bank designed to turn public needs into private profits at our expense: Paying higher fares, fees and tolls because of a political decision to use more expensive private capital would be a “massive transfer of wealth ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, examining how Steve Keen’s warning about the UK’s excessive financialization and consumer debt applies even more strongly in Canada. For further reading…– Keen makes reference to the BIS’ international data as to the ratio of private debt to GDP: – Again, Erica Alini reported on Ipsos’ latest number as to the dire fiscal straits ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Derrick O’Keefe highlights why British Columbia’s voters should be careful before lending any credence to the corporate media’s call for yet another term of corrupt Lib government: As expected, The Vancouver Sun and Province, and the Globe and Mail, published editorials urging voters to keep the Liberals ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2017 Links

The latest from the federal NDP’s leadership campaign. – Several of the candidates have been doing plenty of touring over the past week. And while not all the stops have included media coverage, you’ll find features about Charlie Angus from Timmins, Sudbury (X2), North Bay, and Red Deer, along with Weyburn This Week’s report on ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Derrick O’Keefe makes the case for much-needed regime change in British Columbia, while Nancy MacDonald notes that such a result is far from guaranteed despite the Christy Clark Libs’ gross abuses of the public trust. And Christopher Pollon examines the close link between political donations and the distribution ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Clive Hamilton discusses the accelerating calamity of climate change which we’re allowing to happen: Our best scientists tell us insistently that a calamity is unfolding, that the life-support systems of the Earth are being damaged in ways that threaten our survival. Yet in the face of these facts ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the Libs’ delayed climate change action as going beyond mere backloading of promises to outright destruction in the meantime. For further reading…– For just a few examples of the backloading in the Libs’ budget, see the Northern View’s interview with Nathan Cullen. – The latest report to the United Nations Framework Convention on ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Paul Krugman notes that after promising to bring some outside perspective to politics, Donald Trump is instead offering only a warmed-over version of the Republicans’ typical voodoo economics. And John Cassidy highlights how Trump’s plan appears to be nothing more than to wage class warfare on behalf of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Eva Schaherl offers her take on how to fight against climate change: Stop being distracted by the “Sad!” theatre of the Greatest Show on Earth across our southern border. In Canada our leadership debates should be focused on how to save the world’s life-support systems, not imitating the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Martin Patriquin takes Saskatchewan’s increasing recognition of the Wall government’s institutional corruption to the national stage: Politicians who navigate a corrupted political system have some of the easiest jobs in the world. With the weight and legitimacy of the state behind them, they need not sell anything ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, following up on this post as to the Libs’ cynical repudiation of the very concept of ideas and values in politics. For further reading…– Fair Vote Canada’s list of National Advisory Board members is here – and as noted, it hardly reflects the spin of being “anti-Liberal”. And FVC’s statement as to the importance ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Mark Holmgren writes that there’s no reason why we should allow poverty to continue in a country which has plenty of wealth to reduce it, while Patrick Butler notes that the conservative view of poverty as being solely the result of personal (lack of) merit is oblivious ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Ed Finn reminds us how the economy as a whole – including the private sector – suffers when austerity is inflicted on public services: The public and private sectors have become so interdependent that one cannot be attacked or diminished without hurting the other. Public expenditures often stimulate ...

Accidental Deliberations: On anti-Liberalism

Last night, I responded on Twitter to David Akin’s Lib-fueled attack on citizen engagement in the Ottawa-Vanier by-election: Ummm, about that “anti-Liberal group” #lpc decided to whine about… https://t.co/P5EJiYTSfv #cdnpoli 1/ — Greg Fingas (@juristblog) April 2, 2017 Here’s how it viewed the #lpc when it promised electoral reform, as opposed to breaking that promise: ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Andrew Jackson writes about the opportunities missed when governments restrict their economic policy to propping up the corporate sector, rather than seeking to innovate directly in the public interest: The received wisdom among economists used to be that governments should just set broad “framework” policies such as ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Nick Falvo, Janice Chan and Chidom Otogwu point out that housing is just one of the areas where federal action is needed to reduce poverty and its social harms in Canada. And Falvo also reviews Greg Suttor’s “Still Renovating” as a worthwhile look at housing in Canada. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Charles Smith and Andrew Stevens examine how Brad Wall’s slash-and-burn budget is intended to exploit a crisis for political ends – while also highlighting the type of response needed to reverse the damage: In our view, Budget 2017 should be viewed in two ways. First, it is ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jordon Cooper writes that the Saskatchewan Party’s slash-and-burn budget confirms that for them, the poor don’t matter. CBC reports on the devastating effect the budget will have on municipalities, while Courtney Markewitch reports that Saskatoon’s city council is fighting back. And Joel Senick notes that the planned shutdown ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – David Olive offers his take on what a basic income should look like – and is optimistic that Ontario’s ongoing experiment should hit the mark: A UBI would be pointless in the absence of existing supports. In the Ontario pilot projects, the payout for a single person ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – Brian Jones rightly argues that a fair tax system would go a long way toward eliminating any serious concerns about government deficits. And Marco Chown Oved offers some reason for optimism in the Canada Revenue Agency’s response to the Panama Papers. – David Macdonald examines what could have ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Vicki Nash challenges the claim that unemployment in a precarious economy is generally a matter of choice rather than the absence thereof. And Jia Tolentino argues that we shouldn’t pretend there’s any value in being forced to work oneself to death: It does require a fairly dystopian strain ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – In the wake of a thoroughly disappointing budget day at both the provincial and federal levels, it’s worth taking note of Ivan Sigal’s view on the importance of building trust – rather than limiting citizens to either fake news or fake policies: How do we begin to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Jo Littler writes about the illusion of meritocracy, and how it has contributed to the unconscionable spread of inequality: Over the past few decades, neoliberal meritocracy has been characterised by two key features. First, the sheer scale of its attempt to extend entrepreneurial competition into the nooks ...