The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: Confronting the crisis of violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada

David Suzuki on the crisis of violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada, and the “hard work and leadership of Indigenous women and communities who have spent decades calling for an inquiry.” The post David Suzuki: Confronting the crisis of violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Baratunde Thurston makes the point that even beyond income and wealth inequality, there’s an obviously unfair distribution of second chances in the U.S. depending on one’s race and class. Denis Campbell reports on the link between poverty and childhood obesity, while Jen St. Denis highlights how poverty ...

Politics, Re-Spun: Happy Indigenous Peoples’ Day!

I so hope you had a wonderful Indigenous Peoples’ Day yesterday! In “America” there is a movement to replace the systemically racist Columbus Day. It’s spreading briskly; soon it may reach the 100th Monkey and spread across Turtle Island. In Canada, we had Thanksgiving Day, for all the cornucopia reasons you can think of. But ...

Joe Fantauzzi: Columbus is no hero of mine

Italian-North Americans — especially those of us with roots in the Mezzogiorno (and I include the Ciociaria and Abbruzzo here) — don’t need a Genoese genocidal rapist as our hero. It’s time to eliminate Columbus Day. It’s time for #IndigenousPeoplesDay   Some good reading and watching: ‘All Indians Are Dead?’ At Least That’s What Most Schools Teach ...

Politics, Re-Spun: Columbus Day is Institutionalized Racism

In Canada, we celebrate Thanksgiving Day today, a slight improvement on Columbus day, which institutionalizes systemic racism. Columbus Day celebrates white supremacy. It’s time to stop that now. If you need some elaboration, read this. Seattle did it 2 years ago. Now Vermont has figured out a first step in a solution: turning Columbus Day ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Cindy Blackstock offers a reminder of Canada’s long and shameful history of discrimination against First Nations children. And Donna Ferreiro takes a look at some of the faces of the Sixties Scoop which saw Indigenous children separated from their families due solely to racial and cultural prejudice. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Alex Himelfarb and Trish Hennessy offer their take as to what we should expect out of Ontario’s basic income experiment: Critics rightly argue that basic income is no magic bullet, that indeed there are no magic bullets. The history of the idea of basic income shows it’s no ...

Politics, Re-Spun: Trudeau Spins the Royals

If you’re wondering about what kind of spin cycle Trudeau [#TheNewHarper] put the Royals through to smooth over First Nations discontent with the 21st century version of settler imperialism? Read this: Justin Trudeau’s relationship with indigenous people and the politics of William and Kate’s Canadian Royal tour A cynic might question if the prime minister is ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – David Boyle discusses how the principle of free trade – once intended to empower consumers against monopolies – is instead being used to lock in corporate control: (T)he original idea of free trade was not a simple licence to do whatever you wanted, if you were rich ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Mary O’Hara notes that even a relatively modest and incomplete set of progressive policies has created some important movement toward reducing poverty. And conversely, Caroline Mortimer writes that child poverty is exploding under the Conservative majority government in the UK. – Dean Beeby reports on the cause ...

The Canadian Progressive: Over 1280 archaeologists and historians denounce Dakota Access Pipeline

At least 1281 archaeologists, anthropologists, historians, students and museum directors from the US, Canada and other countries recently signed a letter condemning the destruction of Standing Rock Sioux burial grounds and sacred sites by the Dakota Access Pipeline company. The post Over 1280 archaeologists and historians denounce Dakota Access Pipeline appeared first on The Canadian ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how a recent spate of announcements signals that contrary to their campaign commitments in both theme and detail, there’s been little difference between the Trudeau Liberals and the Harper Conservatives in substance. For further reading…– The point is one being made by plenty of other observers as well in various contexts, including Ross ...

Politics, Re-Spun: End Our Slow Motion Genocide!

Genocide can take place in slow motion, just like weapons of mass destruction. When I learned that people were calling land mines “weapons of mass destruction, in slow motion,” it became obvious that we can practice social/cultural/human genocide in slow motion too. Understanding racism and genocide is no simpler than this, from Zianna Oliphant: Considering ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – John Quiggin argues that public services and corporate control don’t mix – no matter how desperately the people seeking to exploit public money try to pretend otherwise: Market-oriented reforms, particularly in the provision of human services like health, education and public safety, have begun with a working ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Naomi Klein discusses how Canada’s longstanding – if far from inevitable – identity as a resource economy is standing in the way of both needed action on climate change and reconciliation with First Nations: In Canada, cultivation and industrialization were secondary. First and foremost, this country was ...

A Puff of Absurdity: Water Wars and the Last Straw

The next world wars won’t be about land or oil. They’ll be about water. And Canada could be the next Iraq, invaded and decimated for the abundance of our natural resources. We have to stop corporate control over our most necessary resource now before it all slips out of our hands. I watched Maude Barlow ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Branko Milanovic examines whether the U.S.’ tax system is actually progressive all the way to the top of the income spectrum – and finds that there’s not enough data about the treatment of the extremely wealthy to be sure. And Robert Cribb and Marco Chown Oved discuss ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Paul Wells argues that climate change and First Nations reconciliation – two of the issues which the Libs have tried to turn into signature priorities – look set to turn into areas of weakness as Justin Trudeau continues his party’s tradition of dithering. And Martin Lukacs writes that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Henning Meyer interviews Tony Atkinson about the readily-available options to combat inequality – with the first step being to make sure people actually have a voice in the decisions which define how wealth and power are allocated: So, if you dive into the potential solutions you seem to ...

The Common Sense Canadian: Justice for Peace Caravan tells Trudeau: Keep your promises to First Nations 

Members of the Treat 8 “Justice for the Peace” Caravan (Photo: Gary McNutt) Submitted by Andrea Palframan On September 12, the Federal Court of Appeal in Montreal will hear the latest legal challenge to the massive Site C hydroelectric dam already under construction on Treaty 8 territory in northeast British Columbia. First Nations community members from ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Erika Hayasaki surveys the developing body of research on how poverty and deprivation affect a child’s long-term brain development: Early results show a troubling trend: Kids who grow up with higher levels of violence as a backdrop in their lives, based on MRI scans, have weaker real-time neural ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Erika Hayasaki surveys the developing body of research on how poverty and deprivation affect a child’s long-term brain development: Early results show a troubling trend: Kids who grow up with higher levels of violence as a backdrop in their lives, based on MRI scans, have weaker real-time neural ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here (via PressReader), on how Brad Wall is preaching neglect and delay as a response to violent racism (even as he’s fully prepared to use as much political capital as he can muster pitching the idea of a SaskTel selloff). For further reading…– Wall’s comments which try to minimize Saskatchewan’s racism are here. And Donna ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Brad Wall is preaching neglect and delay as a response to violent racism (even as he’s fully prepared to use as much political capital as he can muster pitching the idea of a SaskTel selloff). For further reading…– Wall’s comments which try to minimize Saskatchewan’s racism are here. And Donna Harpauer’s statement ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Martin Jacques writes about the inescapable failings of neoliberalism, along with the question of what alternative will come next: (B)y historical standards, the neoliberal era has not had a particularly good track record. The most dynamic period of postwar western growth was that between the end of the ...