Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Sean Farrell reports on a new OECD study recommending the application of inheritance taxes to reduce wealth inequality. – And Harry Quilter-Pinner discusses Finland’s confirmation that the obvious solution to homelessness – providing housing to people who need it – is also the best. – Nicole Goodkind analyzes ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on Canada’s failure to live up to our self-image as a generous and compassionate country – and the reality that we have plenty of fiscal capacity to close the gap. For further reading…– The abstract for the JAMA article referenced in the column is here, and has already been the subject of comment by ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Andre Picard notes that contrary to our self-image, Canada actually lags behind international peers in health and social spending. And PressProgress points out the same conclusion in new OECD research. – Andrew Mitrovica writes that Doug Ford’s ascendancy in Ontario politics suggests that Canada is catching the Trump ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jim Stanford discusses what can be done to make international terms of trade serve the public, rather than merely offering multinational corporations control over all participants:  Acknowledging that globalisation produces losers as well as winners, allows us to imagine policies to moderate the downsides of trade – and ...

In-Sights: Questions

With which group will Justin Trudeau identify? This one? Or, this one? It was sponsored by subsidized fossil fuel and extractive industries and held on the edge of Vancouver’s inner harbour, one of the places in British Columbia and Washington put at greater risk if dilbit shipments increase. Credit: Bob Mackin, http://thebreaker.news/ Was Trudeau’s Paris commitment ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Noortje Uphoff writes about the long-term effects of growing up in poverty and the resulting stress on a child: Our childhood affects our health across the course of our lives. Stress, it seems, is a major contributor. While a life lived with financial, educational and social security ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – The New York Times’ editorial board comments on the predictable flow of the Trump tax cuts toward primarily the few who already had more wealth than they could possibly put to productive use. And Tom Parkin discusses Jagmeet Singh’s expectation that Canadians expect better from their government: ...

The Common Sense Canadian: On Energy & First Nations, politicians want to have their cake and eat it too

Jonathan Ramos cartoon Canada can fight climate change and build more climate-ravaging pipelines. First Nations’ rights should be respected – just not at the expense of these pipelines, dams and other major projects they oppose. Got it? It’s hard to fathom, but these are the positions of our provincial and federal leaders. They want to have their ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Thomas Edsall discusses the difficulties in trying to address wealth inequality through a money-infused electoral system: Five years ago, for example, Adam Bonica, a political scientist at Stanford, published “Why Hasn’t Democracy Slowed Rising Inequality?” Economic theory, he wrote, holds that “inequality should be at least partially self-correcting ...

Montreal Simon: Colten Boushie and the Ghastly Silence of the Cons

It's now been several days since an all-white jury found a white farmer in Saskatchewan not guilty of anything in the killing of Colten Boushie.And since then there have been demonstrations of sorrow and anger all over this country.So I was really glad to see that Boushie's grief stricken family was able to meet with ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Robert Jago comments on an all-white jury’s acquittal of Gerald Stanley for the shooting death of Colten Boushie. Shree Paradkar notes that the issue of non-representative juries is far from a new one. Scott Gilmore recognizes that Boushie’s death and its aftermath are just one more story ...

Montreal Simon: The Killing of Colten Boushie and the Bigots in Saskatchewan

APTN News A young indigenous man out for a joy ride with his friends. An old white farmer with a gun collection large enough to equip a small army.A gun that goes off "accidentally" and an "accidental bullet" that hits Colten Boushie in the back of the head.An all-white jury that acquits Gerald Stanley of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ed Finn reminds us that Canada has ample resources to bring about positive social change – just as long as we start taxing the wealthy fairly, including by collecting taxes owed on money currently being stashed offshore. – Pierre Fortin reviews the effects of Quebec’s universal affordable child ...

Alberta Politics: Why Alberta’s NDP would likely prefer a Liberal government in Victoria and B.C.’s NDP just might prefer the UCP in Edmonton

PHOTOS: Yoga enthusiasts on the lawn of the B.C. Legislature in Victoria, probably focusing the energy of the cosmos to make Alberta’s bitumen go away. Below: The Alberta Legislature in Edmonton at about the same time of year. There’s nobody on the lawn because it’s too darned cold. Below the lovely architecture, a steely-eyed Alberta ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Brent Patterson rightly worries about the prospect that Justin Trudeau will choose to emulate Donald Trump’s anti-social agenda (just as he’s too often done with Stephen Harper’s): At the time of last year’s federal budget, Finance Minister Bill Morneau commented he would exercise prudence “to ensure that ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Donald Trump is just one of far too many politicians trying to undercut needed counterbalances in the media, political systems and civil society. For further reading…– Rem Reider’s story offers a few examples of Trump’s attacks on the press.– Althia Raj reported on Bill Morneau’s complaints about opposition MPs doing their job, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Maia Szalavitz writes that the atmosphere of competition and status signalling which prevails in unequal societies is directly connected to increased homicide rates: While on the surface, the disputes that triggered these deaths seem trivial – each involved apparently small disagreements and a sense of being seen as ...

In-Sights: Be opinionated, first be informed

In response to my earlier post about crime statistics, a person using the name “Harald” submitted this comment: Try not to forget that the NDP brought casinos to BC, and most of the casinos in BC were built under the NDP. Then there was the scandal with Glen Clark and his issuance of a casino ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Brent Patterson discusses how the Libs are putting the hands of their already-dubious “infrastructure bank” in the hands of people with a track record of turning public services into private cash cows. – David Suzuki takes note of another U.S. government climate report on the dangers of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Gabriel Zucman discusses how the wealthy currently avoid paying their fair share of taxes – and how to stop them by properly attributing income and ensuring registers of wealth. And Micah White is optimistic that the public response to the Paradise Papers may be to develop lasting ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – The Star’s editorial board argues that the Paradise Papers prove the need for a crackdown on offshore tax avoidance. Zach Dubinsky and Harvey Cashore report on one nine-figure scheme cooked up by BMO. And Oxfam offers its list of suggestions to end the UK’s tax scandals. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Mark Karlin interviews George Monbiot about the prospect of politics based on empathy, sharing and belonging. – Andrew Jackson and Kate McInturff each offer their take on the federal fiscal update – with both lamenting the Libs’ lack of ambition. – Karl Nerenberg highlights how the federal ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Ian Welsh neatly summarizes the rules needed to ensure that capitalism doesn’t drown out social good: Capitalism, as it works, destroys itself in a number of ways. For capitalism to work, it must be prevented from doing so: it must not be allowed to form unregulated monopolies ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Rachel Bunker writes that Equifax represents the worst of an out-of-control capitalist system, as a poorly-regulated and unreliable credit reporting operation is making profits for itself by reinforcing existing discrimination among other businesses. – Naomi Klein discusses this summer’s spate of wildfires and widespread smoke as showing ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Paul Krugman discusses how the Republicans’ latest attempt to undermine U.S. health care is built on a foundation of cruelty and lies – and is entirely consistent with their usual modus operandi. And Joe Watts reports on new polling showing how popular Jeremy Corbyn’s progressive policy agenda is ...