Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Ed Finn discusses how corporate giants exert far more influence than we generally know – or should be willing to accept. And Joseph Schwartz and Bhaskar Sunkara comment on the difficulty in achieving durable social-democratic policies while economic power is concentrated in the corporate elite. – Thomas ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Labour Day reading. – Ed Finn offers a reminder of the rights and benefits we now take for granted which were won only through labour organization: Look back at Canada’s 150-year history, and you’ll find that many of the basic rights and benefits we all enjoy were originally fought for and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Larry Elliott is optimistic that the UK’s election result will lead to an end of destructive austerity. James Downie comments on the example Jeremy Corbyn’s campaign provides for progressives in the U.S. (and elsewhere). And Karl Nerenberg writes about the importance of youth turnout in boosting Labour’s fortunes. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Ed Finn reminds us how the economy as a whole – including the private sector – suffers when austerity is inflicted on public services: The public and private sectors have become so interdependent that one cannot be attacked or diminished without hurting the other. Public expenditures often stimulate ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Mainly Macro offers a useful definition of neoliberalism, while highlighting its relationship to austerity. And Ed Finn writes that we shouldn’t be too quick to presume neoliberalism is going to disappear just because it’s proven to be harmful in practice – and that it will take a massive ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading. – Tim Harford discusses how insurance and other industries are built on exploiting people who are risk-averse due to the inability to absorb substantial costs as “money pumps” for those who have more than they need: (L)et’s step back and ask ourselves what insurance is for. Classical economics has ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Ed Finn discusses how to fight for needed alternatives to neoliberalism in the face of seemingly daunting odds and structural barriers. – Noah Smith points out how most economic analysis omits important social factors which ultimately matter far more to people than marginal GDP. And as a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Ed Finn reminds us that “free trade” agreements have always served to increase the wealth and power of those who already have the most at the expense of social interests. And Scott Sinclair and Angella MacEwen each offer their take on Parliament’s hearings into the Trans-Pacific Partnership. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Eric Reguly highlights the growing possibility of a global revolt against corporate-centred trade agreements: (A) funny thing happened on the way to the free trade free-for-all: A lot of people were becoming less rich and more angry, to the point that globalization seems set to go into reverse. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Ed Finn comments on the history of neoliberalism – but notes that while the public is rightly skeptical of corporate spin, that awareness hasn’t yet translated into a strong alternative: (S)cores of well-known thinkers, writers, economists, and activists have vociferously denounced the many abuses of large business empires ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your election day reading. – Ed Finn discusses how neoliberalism is damaging Canada, and what we need to do to reverse its influence: Corporate influence on federal politics, the country’s flawed electoral system, and the staunch pursuit of a political and economic ideology since the 1980s that has threatened some of Canada’s ...