Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jake Johnson writes about the obscene amount of money handed to the wealthy in the U.S. by the Republicans’ tax scam. And Robert Reich discusses how the spread of inequality and isolation helped to lay the groundwork for Donald Trump’s destructive presidency. – Meanwhile, Mel Rothenburger points ...

Alberta Politics: Review of Canada’s energy systems unlikely to cut through noise generated by pipeline hysteria

The furious debate about the merits of current and future pipeline projects underscores the need for an evidence-based long-term energy strategy for our country, the conclusions of a new review of Canada’s energy systems suggest. Alas, the report released yesterday by the Corporate Mapping Project and its partners at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives ...

Alberta Politics: Embarrassing honorary degree stories: ‘Did no one warn them?’

You have to ask why universities bother handing out honorary degrees like bonbons when you think about all the trouble it can cause them. Consider the embarrassing 2012 case of the Israeli university that came up with a scheme to give an honorary degree to an unsavoury right-wing foreign politician “in appreciation of his revered ...

Alberta Politics: Jason Kenney joins attack on David Suzuki; complains too many U of A honorary degrees go to progressives

Where is the Globe and Mail, the National Post, federal Opposition leader Andrew Scheer? After all, they were all such convincing defenders of intellectual freedom on campus when the barbs were being directed at Jordan Peterson, the University of Toronto professor who is “the Darth Maul of tenured campus bad boys,” as one wag deconstructed ...

daveberta.ca – Alberta Politics: Before David Suzuki there was the William Aberhart honorary degree scandal at the University of Alberta

The decision by the University of Alberta Senate to grant environmentalist, scientist and broadcaster David Suzuki an honorary degree has the university community tied in knots. University President David Turpin responded to criticism with an open letter today, but criticism from Dean of Business Joseph Doucet and Dean of Engineering Fraser Forbes gives the impression of an ...

Alberta Politics: If there was ever a time for the U of A to stick to its guns and welcome David Suzuki to Edmonton, this is it!

The University of Alberta’s dean of engineering believes his faculty faces “the worst crisis, a crisis of trust, that we’ve faced in more than three decades.” The immediate cause of this perceived looming disaster for the U of A’s most favoured faculty? “The conferral of a single honorary degree,” wrote Fraser Forbes yesterday in an ...

daveberta.ca – Alberta Politics: Knickers in a twist over David Suzuki’s U of A honorary degree

Photo: Environmentalist, scientist, author, and broadcaster David Suzuki (credit: David Climenhaga) The decision by the University of Alberta Senate to present an honorary degree to high profile environmentalist, scientist, author, broadcaster and Order of Canada recipient Dr. David Suzuki has aroused much controversy from conservative partisans, Postmedia columnists, U of A donors and staff. It even ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ann Pettifor discusses the trend toward financialization which has led to regular economic disasters – and suggests the public is well aware it’s getting left behind in the policy choices which have created it. – ScienceDaily takes note of the strong connection between education levels and longevity. – ...

Alberta Politics: University top brass salaries capped; David Suzuki to get honourary degree from U of A! Stand by for fireworks!

PHOTOS: High-profile B.C. environmentalist, scientist, author and broadcaster David Suzuki. Below: Alberta Advanced Education Minister Marlin Schmidt, University of Alberta President David Turpin (Photo: The Gauntlet), and United Conservative Party Opposition Leader Jason Kenney. The Alberta government has put a much-needed cap on the salaries of top university administrators, providing a nice break in the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Peter Gowan and Ryan Cooper write about the need for much more affordable social housing across the income spectrum. Rhys Kesselman responds to a few of the more laughable attacks on British Columbia’s more progressive property tax. And Stephen Punwasi discusses the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada’s warning ...

Alberta Politics: Jason Kenney tries to look tough, but that ship’s already sailed with Rachel Notley at the helm

PHOTOS: The real Rachel Notley, looking tough and determined, as she is. Below: The new slimmed down, but still not very scary looking, Jason Kenney, trying to scare us of course. (Yes, the message from Mr. Kenney’s social media meme has been modified by your poor-sport blogger.) The real Dr. David Suzuki, who is the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Wanda Wyporska highlights the UK’s corporate executive fat cats, and argues that it’s long past time for the public to stop rewarding them: So let’s put fat cat pay in context. Yes it has come down slightly, as Sir Martin Sorrell has seen his pay cut from ...

The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: Corporate influence inflames political cynicism

Even though elected politicians, especially those who end up holding cabinet positions, often prioritize corporate interests over those of their electors, David Suzuki still encourages us to overcome political cynicism and participate in the democratic process. The post David Suzuki: Corporate influence inflames political cynicism appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Brent Patterson discusses how the Libs are putting the hands of their already-dubious “infrastructure bank” in the hands of people with a track record of turning public services into private cash cows. – David Suzuki takes note of another U.S. government climate report on the dangers of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Andre Picard argues that Bernie Sanders’ trip to highlight Canada’s health care system shouldn’t be taken as an indication we lack plenty of room for improvement. And Margot Sanger-Katz writes that Sanders indeed learned lessons about the holes in our health coverage. – David Suzuki discusses the ...

The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: It’s time to nix neonics

David Suzuki on why it’s time for Canada to ban neonics, a class of widely used neuro-active insecticides that harm not only the pests they’re designed to kill, but also bees and other pollinators we rely on for about one-third of food crops. The post David Suzuki: It’s time to nix neonics appeared first on ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Phillip Inman reports on a new UN study (PDF) showing that the inequality caused by austerity results in particular harm to women who are forced to take on more unpaid labour. – David Sloan Wilson interviews Sigrun Aasland about the mix and balance of public and private development ...

The Canadian Progressive: Can emissions shrink while the Canadian economy grows?

David Suzuki asks: Is the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change framework correct in assuming Canada can reduce greenhouse gas emissions while growing its economy? The post Can emissions shrink while the Canadian economy grows? appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Naomi Klein examines how climate change has contributed to a summer of extreme weather disasters, while David Suzuki highlights how we can work with nature to respond to increased flooding. And Emily Atkin discusses the outsized damage 90 corporate behemoths have done to our climate. – Meanwhile, Abacus ...

The Canadian Progressive: Study finds Exxon misled the public by withholding climate knowledge

A new study by Harvard’s Geoffrey Supran and Naomi Oreskes, which analyzed Exxon Mobil’s research and communications over 40 years, found that the company withheld information relating to its products’ climate impact. The post Study finds Exxon misled the public by withholding climate knowledge appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2017 Links

The latest from the federal NDP’s leadership campaign. – Bruce Anderson and David Coletto take a look at public perceptions of Canada’s political parties. And the relatively small differences in public views of the NDP as compared to the Liberals may offer either a suggestion as to what grounds of distinction appear most open at ...

The Canadian Progressive: We only have one Earth, and we’re overshooting its capacity

As our burgeoning demands on the Earth continue to overshoot its capacity to renew resources, it’s time for a serious rethink, argues David Suzuki. Basically, we’re “using up the biological capital that should be our children’s legacy.” The post We only have one Earth, and we’re overshooting its capacity appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: Bicycling never gets old

Bicycling is part of the solution to today’s environmental and fuel crises, and the benefits of increased cycling go beyond reducing pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, David Suzuki argues. The post David Suzuki: Bicycling never gets old appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: Trump is a pariah in the face of climate crisis

In withdrawing from the Paris Agreement, U.S. President Donald Trump demonstrated monumental ignorance about climate change and the agreement itself, writes David Suzuki. The post David Suzuki: Trump is a pariah in the face of climate crisis appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Dalia Marin argues that in order to avoid corporate dominance over citizens and workers around the globe, we should be developing international competition policies and systems to combat the concentration of wealth: Two forces in today’s digital economy are driving the global decline in labor’s share of total ...