Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – James Wilt argues that the labour movement should be putting its weight behind green housing which will produce both social and environmental benefits along with jobs: Workers need affordable homes. Workers also need stable and properly compensated jobs, especially those transitioning from work in oil, gas and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your long weekend reading. – Cole Stangler interviews Raquel Garrido about the political critique behind Jean-Luc Melenchon’s emerging presidential campaign – and it sounds equally applicable in Canada: One of the reasons why the current regime is lacking consent in French society is because the process for electing officials allows them to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Andrew Jackson writes about the opportunities missed when governments restrict their economic policy to propping up the corporate sector, rather than seeking to innovate directly in the public interest: The received wisdom among economists used to be that governments should just set broad “framework” policies such as ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Duncan Cameron writes that democratic socialism can produce a fair economy for everybody. And the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives puts the possibilities in concrete terms with its alternative federal budget. – Armine Yalnizyan argues that it’s long past time for a budget focused on gender equality. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Duncan Cameron writes that democratic socialism can produce a fair economy for everybody. And the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives puts the possibilities in concrete terms with its alternative federal budget. – Armine Yalnizyan argues that it’s long past time for a budget focused on gender equality. ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the first few steps of the federal NDP’s leadership race. For further reading…– CBC News reported on Peter Julian’s campaign launch, while Alex Ballingall covered Charlie Angus’ and Aaron Wherry wrote about Guy Caron’s. And Mia Rabson reports that Niki Ashton will officially announce her candidacy next week.– So far Peter Julian looks ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the first few steps of the federal NDP’s leadership race. For further reading…– CBC News reported on Peter Julian’s campaign launch, while Alex Ballingall covered Charlie Angus’ and Aaron Wherry wrote about Guy Caron’s. And Mia Rabson reports that Niki Ashton will officially announce her candidacy next week.– So far Peter Julian looks ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Naomi Klein writes that Donald Trump’s cabinet represents a direct takeover of the U.S. government by the corporate oligarchy – and comments on what the progressive movement needs to do to fight back: Let us be clear: This is not a peaceful transition of power. It’s a corporate ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones highlights the toxic stress and other health problems borne disproportionately by members of the LGBT community who face systematic discrimination. And Tayla Smith and Jaitra Sathyandran discuss how temporary foreign workers (and others facing precarious work situations) tend to suffer preventable harm to their health ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – James Wilt discusses a much-needed effort to map out the connections between fossil fuel corporations. And Bruce Campbell highlights how the resource sector is among the most prominent examples of regulatory capture in Canada. – Meanwhile, Steven Chase notes that even as Stephane Dion tries to excuse the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Peter Mazereeuw reports on the growing opposition to the Trans-Pacific Partnership which may result in it never coming into force. And Jerry Dias reminds us why we should be glad if that movement wins out over the corporate forces who assembled it behind closed doors: (T)he far ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Justin Trudeau’s control over the federal electoral reform committee looks to extend a familiar pattern of top-down government into the design of our electoral system. (And I’ll add one point here which didn’t make it into the column: the committee design features a bare Lib majority which is itself likely to create ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Susan Delacourt writes that the Libs’ federal budget is best seen as requiring an overriding “to be continued”. And Don Martin flags a few points which may prove important later – including what might be an unexplained delay of any electoral reform. – Meanwhile, Teuila Fuatai highlights how ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – CBC exposes the galling amnesty deal offered by the Canada Revenue Agency to wealthy individuals who evaded paying tax through a sham offshoring scheme. – Caelainn Barr and Shiv Malik examine the generational divide which is seeing the income of young adults wither away across most of ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, with my take on the factors NDP members should take into account in evaluating Tom Mulcair’s leadership. For further reading…– I’ve written numerous previous posts on the future of Mulcair and the NDP which expand on the points made in the column.– Michael den Tandt offers his view of Mulcair. Chantal Hebert and Tim ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, expanding on these posts as to what might come next as Canada’s political parties map out their strategies on electoral reform. For further reading…– Chantal Hebert wonders whether Justin Trudeau will face internal pressure to renege on his promise of electoral reform. But considering that the Libs’ voter coalition consists of significantly more voters ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Amy Goodman interviews Joseph Stiglitz about the corporate abuses the Trans-Pacific Partnership will allow to take priority over the public interest. And Stuart Trew and Scott Sinclair offer some suggestions to at least ensure that Canadians have an opportunity for meaningful review and discussion before being stuck ...

Accidental Deliberations: On continuing leadership

Others have responded to Chantal Hebert’s latest by pointing out her past track record of telling the NDP when to change leaders. But even leaving that history aside, it’s worth seriously questioning her assumptions. To start with, I’m rather less certain than Hebert that even Stephen Harper will be out of the picture altogether by ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Kevin Carmichael compares the federal parties’ promises to help parents and concludes the NDP’s child care plan to hold far more social and economic benefit, while Natascia Lypny likewise finds that parents are more interested in actual affordable child-care spaces than tax baubles. CTV reports on the NDP’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Sherri Torjman comments on the importance of social policy among our political choices, while lamenting its absence from the first leaders’ debate: (M)arket economies go through cycles, with periods of stability followed by periods of slump and uncertainty. Canada has weathered these economic cycles, and even major ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Michal Rozworski reminds us that austerity in Canada is nothing new under Con or Lib governments, while pointing out what the public needs to do to repel it: The campaigning Stephen Harper boasts that his tough austerity policies saved the Canadian economy. Lost in the rhetoric are ...

Accidental Deliberations: On fragile fixes

Some high-profile commentators seem to be accepting a highly dubious conclusion about the federal election date expected this fall. So let’s take a quick look at what a “fixed” election date actually means for a government which has no qualms about breaking the rules – and why the fact that we’re seemingly on track for ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading. – Heather Boushey writes about the Great Gatsby Curve showing a direct correlation between equality and social mobility – and conversely, that high inequality severely limits opportunity for large numbers of people. And Vikas Bajaj discusses how high inequality also harms overall economic development. – But of course, we’ll ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how the rise of Rachel Notley’s NDP serves largely to bring Alberta’s political system into step with those of its regional neighbours. For further reading…– Murray Mandryk had previously pointed out why we should be cautious about reading too much into the Alberta results. But the most important distinction looks to be that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Sean McElwee offers a new set of evidence that the right-wing Republicans who run on the economy in fact do it nothing but harm. And David Dayen discusses how Bernie Sanders may be able to push the U.S.’ policy discussion into a far more positive area by forcing ...