Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Lana Payne questions whether Justin Trudeau’s brief nod to precarious work and burgeoning inequality will be reflected in any action. But Sheila Malcolmson notes that Trudeau’s say-anything approach includes turning himself into a human shield for Donald Trump, while PressProgress reports on the record-breaking petition to push Trudeau ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Lana Payne questions whether Justin Trudeau’s brief nod to precarious work and burgeoning inequality will be reflected in any action. But Sheila Malcolmson notes that Trudeau’s say-anything approach includes turning himself into a human shield for Donald Trump, while PressProgress reports on the record-breaking petition to push Trudeau ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Olivia Loveridge-Greene comments on new research showing how many workers may be forced to keep working into their 70s or beyond in order to be able to stay afloat. And Don Pittis explains why tax-free savings accounts and other giveaways to the wealthy won’t do anything to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Olivia Loveridge-Greene comments on new research showing how many workers may be forced to keep working into their 70s or beyond in order to be able to stay afloat. And Don Pittis explains why tax-free savings accounts and other giveaways to the wealthy won’t do anything to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – George Monbiot examines how politics in the UK and the U.S. are dominated by unaccountable corporate money. And Stephen Maher and B.J. Siekierski report that both the Libs and Cons are fully on board – as Rona Ambrose managed to take (however justified) umbrage at Justin Trudeau’s vacation ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Rahul Kalvapalle reports on the latest Ipsos poll showing how younger Canadians expect to lead a worse life than the generations who went before them. – PressProgress examines how inequality has been burgeoning under Christy Clark’s B.C. Lib government. And Maimuna Majumder notes that the toxic effects of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Peter Goodman observes that any meaningful action to build a more equal economy needs to involve bolstering wages and workers’ rights – meaning that the elites-only musings in Davos miss the point entirely: Davos is — at least rhetorically — consumed with worries about the shortcomings of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Karl Nerenberg examines new research from the Canadian Centre for the Study of Living Standards showing how workers have seen hardly any benefit from four decades of productivity gains which have filled corporate coffers: (I)n Canada, the productivity of labour — the amount workers produce per unit of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Neil Irwin examines one of the key ideas underlying the U.S. Democrats’ economic plans, being that workers need to have meaningful choices rather than being trapped by a limited and slanted set of available employers and work structures: Labor market monopsony is the idea that when there isn’t ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – John McDonnell outlines a progressive alternative to neoliberal economic policy: The increasing automation of jobs, reduced dependence on carbon fuels, artificial intelligence and the so-called gig economy have provoked understandable anger among many workers whose jobs are under threat. More generally, concerns about the effect on the labour market are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Jake Kivanc points out that what little job growth Canada can claim primarily involves precarious work. And Nora Loreto discusses the crucial link between labour and social change: (T)o confront climate change, we must imagine the role of workers in the transition to an oil-free economy: how ...

My journey with AIDS…and more!: Remembering “The Romans” – The Romans II Health and Recreation Spa

just an illustration🙂 I found it in the Yellow Pages, which I was checking out at the Toronto Coach Terminal on Bay Street. I had just arrived from Niagara College. It was 1979. I was 19. I thumbed through the book, checking “Baths”, which brought up bathroom fixtures mostly, then I think I tried “Saunas”. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Joel Wood highlights the social cost of carbon as a crucial reason to work on reducing greenhouse gas emissions rather than insisting on doing the absolute least the rest of the world will tolerate. And needless to say, Brad Wall’s idea of an argument for the position that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – Bruce Johnstone notes that rather than further attacking public services which have already been under siege throughout his stay in office, Brad Wall and his government should be looking to question Saskatchewan’s inexplicable giveaways to businesses: Well, if Doherty is looking for some “low-hanging fruit” to make our ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Erin Seatter interviews Adam Lynes-Ford about Brian Day’s latest attack on universal Medicare. And Ricochet’s editorial board highlights how Day is ultimately fighting only to exacerbate inequality: Discrimination against racialized and Indigenous patients fosters health disparities across our country and sometimes leads to death. Poverty hurts Indigenous ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Paolo Giuliano and Antonio Spilimbergo study (PDF) how the economic conditions an individual’s youth influence enduring values – and find that the experience of an economic shock tends to lead to a greater appreciation of a fair redistribution of resources: Consistent with theories of social psychology, this ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Owen Jones interviews Ha-Joon Chang about the foreseeable harm caused by the UK’s austerity, as well as the false claims used to push it. – The Stoney Creek News rightly argues that Canada Post should move toward posting banking in large part due to the potential to improve ...

Left Over: Brexit – Stage Left…

The Guardian view on post-Brexit politics: perilous times for progressives Editorial Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn leaves his home in north London in the wake of resignations from his shadow cabinet. Photograph: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images Sunday 26 June 2016 20.12 BST   Frankly, I don’t see why all the panic is being created..it’s terrible that immigrants feel ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Duncan Cameron discusses how deficit hysteria has overshadowed the far more important issues raised by the Trudeau Libs’ inaugural budget: Ottawa deficit spending is not big enough to stimulate an economy lagging since the oil price collapse. The Canadian economy has suffered a major external shock, with Alberta ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Martin Regg Cohn exposes the Ontario Libs’ pay-to-play governing strategy, as cabinet ministers have been instructed to use their roles and access to meet fund-raising targets of up to half a million dollars per year. And Gary Mason reports that privileged access to Christy Clark is likewise ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Sean McElwee examines how the wealthy control the U.S.’ political system, while public opinion plays far too little role in policy choices: A comprehensive study by Grossmann finds that public opinion was a significant factor in 25 percent of policy changes since 1945. More influential factors have included ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Emily Dugan writes about the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s finding that young UK adults are facing the worst economic prospects of the last several generations. And Betty Ann Adam reports on Charles Plante’s work on the value of a living wage, both for employers and society at ...

Writings of J. Todd Ring: Vote! Get involved, vote, speak, write, raise your voice – and get Harper out

Whether you volunteer, write, canvass, talk to friends and family, or in some other way engage in, and promote, democracy in Canada, please do be involved. Vote, encourage others to vote, talk about the issues, and let’s see a massive turn-out today, along with a lively, and much-needed, thoughtful discussion. This is our country, and ...

Writings of J. Todd Ring: Vote! Get involved, vote, speak, write, raise your voice – and get Harper out

Whether you volunteer, write, canvass, talk to friends and family, or in some other way engage in, and promote, democracy in Canada, please do be involved. Vote, encourage others to vote, talk about the issues, and let’s see a massive turn-out today, along with a lively, and much-needed, thoughtful discussion. This is our country, and ...

The Canadian Progressive: Lauren Bialystok: Empty Schools Campaign denies children essential education

Opponents of Ontario’s sex education curriculum are broadcasting misrepresentations and bigotry “under the guise of parental rights”, argues Lauren Bialystok, an Assistant Professor of Ethics and Education at the University of Toronto’s Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. The post Lauren Bialystok: Empty Schools Campaign denies children essential education appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.