CuriosityCat: UK Election – my forecast? A new government lead by Labour’s Corbyn as MP

Now’s a good time to stick my neck out and forecast that come June 8, PM May will be booted out of power and replaced shortly thereafter by a new Labour government, with Corbyn as Prime Minister. Here’s the latest Yougov forecast, which shows May’s Tories at 310 votes (16 shy of the majority of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Gary Younge examines how Jeremy Corbyn and an unabashedly progressive campaign platform are making massive gains in a UK general election cynically called to exploit Labour’s perceived weakness: Seeing the response to Labour’s election manifesto last week was a clear illustration of just how powerful the amnesiac qualities ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Owen Jones writes that we should give credit for the failure of the Trans-Pacific Partnership to the popular opposition which will be need to push back against Donald Trump, rather than pretending it represents a win for Trump himself: That Trump has any ownership over TPP is ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – John McDonnell outlines a progressive alternative to neoliberal economic policy: The increasing automation of jobs, reduced dependence on carbon fuels, artificial intelligence and the so-called gig economy have provoked understandable anger among many workers whose jobs are under threat. More generally, concerns about the effect on the labour market are ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, following up on my earlier column on racism in Saskatchewan with a look at the lessons we can learn from responses to similar issues in Alberta and the U.S. (And no, “do nothing” still isn’t an acceptable answer.) For further reading…– Jesse and Julia Lipscombe’s #MakeItAwkward campaign site is here. And Jason Markusoff’s interview ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Owen Jones discusses the importance of the labour movement in ensuring that workers can get ahead in life, rather than drowning in debt: Nights spent staring at the ceiling as worries dance manically around the brain. Taking a deep breath before opening the gas bill. Sacrificing a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Lucy Shaddock offers a response to the Institute for Fiscal Studies’ report on poverty and inequality in the UK, while McKinsey finds that hundreds of millions of people in advanced economies are seeing their real incomes stagnate or decline. And Mariana Mazzucato and Michael Jacobs provide their take ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Armine Yalnizyan points out the choice between a basic income and the provision of basic services, while making a strong case to focus on the latter: At the federal level, the cost of raising everyone’s income above the poverty line is an estimated $30 billion a year. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Harry Leslie Smith writes about the problems with a U.K. budget and economic plan designed to avoid any moral compass: Nothing better illustrates to me that Osborne is sailing us back to the harsh and socially unsustainable cruelty of the 1930s than his removal of substantial benefits from ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Ed Miliband offers his take on inequality and the political steps needed to combat it: (T)he terms of the case against inequality have changed. I have always believed that inequality divides people, deprives many of the chance to succeed and makes us all worse off. But now ...

Accidental Deliberations: On distinguishing factors

The common personalities and strategies by tired right-wing governments are leading to some comparisons between the ongoing Canadian campaign and the UK’s election earlier this year. But even as we treat David Cameron’s re-election as an important warning, let’s note that there’s a rather crucial difference between the two. In the UK, the Conservatives’ sudden ...

Parchment in the Fire: Why I take issue with the Observer’s stance on Jeremy Corbyn | Comment is free | The Guardian

The veteran writer offers a personal response to last week’s editorial on the new Labour leader Source: Why I take issue with the Observer’s stance on Jeremy Corbyn | Comment is free | The Guardian Filed under: Uncategorized Tagged: Corbyn, Labour Party, UK Politics

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Following his resounding win to become Labour’s leader, Jeremy Corbyn describes the proper role of government as a vehicle for shared benefits: We understand aspiration and we understand that it is only collectively that our aspirations can be realised. Everybody aspires to an affordable home, a secure ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Laurie Penny argues that Jeremy Corbyn’s remarkable run to lead the Labour Party represents an important challenge to the theory that left-wing parties should avoid talking about principles in the name of winning power – particularly since the result hasn’t been much success on either front. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Robert Reich describes how U.S. voters are rejecting the concept of a ruling class from both the left and the right – while noting that it’s vital to get the answer right as to which alternative is worth pursuing. And Owen Jones sees Jeremy Corbyn’s rise as ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Carol Goar rightly criticizes Stephen Harper’s plan to deal with an apparent recession by making Canada’s economy even worse off through yet more cuts. Andrew Jackson writes that denying or ignoring an economic downturn won’t make it go away, while Louis-Philippe Rochon traces its origins to the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Adrian Morrow reports on Al Gore’s explanation as to how the fight against climate change can be economically as well as environmentally beneficial, while CTV points out a new Nanos poll showing that Canadians largely agree with the view that cleaner technology can and should replace dirty ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Paul de Grauwe points out that the European push to force Greece into continued austerity is the most important factor holding back a recovery, as the country would be fully solvent if it were being allowed to borrow money on anything but the most draconian of terms. And ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Elizabeth Warren reminds us (PDF) that previous trade agreements were packaged with the same promises of labour and environmental standards being used to sell the latest versions – and that there’s been no enforcement whatsoever of the elements of the deals which were supposed to protect the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Lawrence Ezrow writes that the disconnect between the public and policymaking that’s done so much harm to the U.S. isn’t quite as severe in more equal countries. And the Equality Trust is looking to ensure that the UK’s political parties make the reduction of inequality into a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Joe Gunn argues that it’s long past time for Canada to live up to its climate commitments. And Carol Linnitt writes that further delay will do nothing but damage to our economy and our democracy as well as our planet: Taking meaningful climate action would mean increasing ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to end your week. – Simon Wren-Lewis nicely describes the austerity con (coming soon in extreme form to an Alberta near you): ‘Mediamacro’ is the term I use to describe macroeconomics as it is portrayed in the majority of the media. Mediamacro has a number of general features. It puts much more emphasis ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Both Richard Bilton and Matthew Yglesias discuss Le Monde’s reporting on HSBC’s active participation in widespread tax evasion. And James Bloodworth rightly argues that we should see tax avoidance as socially unacceptable even if governments fail to do their job in ensuring that everybody pays their fair ...

CuriosityCat: You gotta love those Brits!

The Gladiators prepare … Prime Minister Cameron, facing requests for three televised debates before the May election, is dodging and weaving, having calculated that he has more to lose than to gain by debating three or more other opponents. Voters tend to favour him over his main contender, who is fighting low expectations, as this ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Will Hutton compares the alternative goals of either shrinking government to the point where it does nothing or harnessing it to meet everybody’s basic needs, and explains why we should demand the latter: A financial crisis has been allowed to morph into a crisis of public provision because ...