Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ben Steverman examines the unfairness of the U.S.’ tax system – which, like Canada’s, offers gratuitous giveaways to wealthy investors which force workers to pay more: Politicians have intentionally set tax rates on wages much higher than those on long-term investment returns. The U.S. has a progressive tax ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2017 Platform Analysis – Niki Ashton

As I’ve noted previously, Niki Ashton’s debate strategy doesn’t often seem to involve discussing policy at length. And that’s a shame, because she’s done more than any other candidate to raise (and propose solutions to) a broad range of issues. While Ashton has primarily emphasized her proposals for free tuition and social ownership, other parts ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Ben Casselman points out how corporate consolidation can produce harmful results for consumers and workers alike. Guy Standing discusses how we’re all worse off for the spread of rentier capitalism. And Mariana Mazzucato reminds us that an entrepreneurial government is a must if we want to see general ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Scott Sinclair and Stuart Trew applaud Wallonia’s principled stance against the CETA. And Joseph Stiglitz discusses the need to set up social and economic systems which actually serve the public good, rather than favouring corporate interests: Where the trade agreements failed, it was not because the US was ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Larry Elliott writes that the public is rightly frustrated with an economic model designed to shift money to those who already have the most – and that progressive parties in particular need to offer a meaningful alternative: The belief on the left was that 2008 sounded the death ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Christopher Ingraham points out that while many luxuries are getting cheaper with time, the necessities of life are becoming much more difficult to afford: Many manufactured goods — like TVs and appliances — come from overseas, where labor costs are cheaper. “International, global competition lowers prices directly ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Robert Reich discusses how our economy is rigged so that the self-proclaimed risk-takers actually can’t lose: I don’t want to pick on Ms. Mayer or the managers of the funds that invest in Yahoo. They’re typical of the no-lose system in which America’s corporate and financial elite now ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the contrast between a Saskatchewan Party platform (and government) dedicated to handing money to the people who need it least, and an NDP which plans to help where it’s most needed with what limited resources are left since Brad Wall wasted a boom. For further reading…– CBC reported here on the stark difference ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Andrew Jackson argues that a federal infrastructure program can and should be oriented toward developing a skilled and diverse workforce, rather than rewarding free-riding contractors who don’t contribute to those outcomes. And a joint statement from community and labour groups posted by Angella MacEwen argues that a major ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Michael Hiltzik discusses how corporate apologists are trying (but failing) to minimize the existence and importance of income inequality. Lawrence Martin notes that the rest of Canada’s economic indicators are similarly signalling that Conservative dogma is of absolutely no use in the real world. And Michael Geist observes ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the Saskatchewan Party’s choice to turn the graduate retention credit into a purely political goodie rather than a program which could conceivably retain Saskatchewan graduates, while at the same time devaluing the very concept of education for its own sake. For further reading…– The province’s explanation (such as it is) can be found ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – For those looking for information about today’s day of action against C-51, Leadnow and Rabble both have details. – Meanwhile, CBC reports that a professor merely taking pictures on public land near a proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline site is already being harassed by the RCMP under current law. ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: Our Gift to Nova Scotia #nlpoli

As of March 31, 2014,  Memorial University had an annual deficit of about $330 million. In 2013-2014,  the annual cost of subsidising tuition for out-of-province students at Memorial was $112 million. The provincial government operation subsidy to the university has doubled since 2004. Those are a few of snippets from the Auditor General’s 2014 report. ...

Political Eh-conomy: Means-test the rich, or another argument for eliminating tuition

Here’s an oversimplified choice for how to fund post-secondary education. Imagine you have two options for dealing with how people pay for post-secondary education: Universal free tuition, means-testing to see if you are rich enough to pay Universal tuition fees, means-testing to see if you are poor enough to not pay Either of these can ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Linda McQuaig discusses the radical difference between how Canadians want to see public resources used (based on the example set by governments elsewhere), and the determination of the Cons and their corporate allies to instead fritter away every dime of fiscal capacity the federal government manages to find: ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Charlie Smith discusses – and then follows up on – Donald Gutstein’s work in tracing the connections between the Harper Cons and the shadowy, U.S.-based network of right-wing propaganda mills: In Harperism: How Stephen Har­per and His Think Tank Colleagues Have Transformed Canada (James Lorimer & Company Ltd.), ...

Things Are Good: Germany Now Has Free Tuition

Germany has done something that the rest the developed world should copy: reducing post-secondary tuition fees to zero. Open and accessible education is key to making a richer and more prosperous country – Germany clearly gets this. In these modern times education is more important than ever so it’s really great to see “We got ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Mike Konczal and Bryce Covert write that an effective solution to wealth inequality shouldn’t be limited to redistributing individual income or assets, but should also include the development of a commonwealth which benefits everybody: Instead of just giving people more purchasing power, we should be taking basic ...

Canadian Political Viewpoints: We Also Accept First-Born Children

Source: CBC News: Saskatchewan Tuition Increase Highest in CanadaSource: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives: Paul Gingrich: After the Freeze: Restoring University Affordability in Saskatchewan Source: Macleans OnCampus: Sask. NDP Commit to Tuition FreezeSource: Macleans OnCampus: Saskatchewan Party Pledges Affordability Source: News Talk 650: Wall Reacts to NDP Post Secondary PlatformSource: Saskatoon Homepage: UofS Salaries Questioned ...

Canadian Political Viewpoints: We Also Accept First-Born Children

Source: CBC News: Saskatchewan Tuition Increase Highest in CanadaSource: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives: Paul Gingrich: After the Freeze: Restoring University Affordability in Saskatchewan Source: Macleans OnCampus: Sask. NDP Commit to Tuition FreezeSource: Macleans OnCampus: Saskatchewan Party Pledges Affordability Source: News Talk 650: Wall Reacts to NDP Post Secondary PlatformSource: Saskatoon Homepage: UofS Salaries Questioned ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: The Impact of the Tuition Freeze #nlpoli

As students head back to Memorial University, you can see the impact the ongoing tuition freeze is having on the university’s budget. You can see it in the policy to pass credit card handling fees on to students.  In the official university organ – the Gazette – the university claimed it eliminated the fee.  That’s ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: Learn Now. Pay Later. #nlpoli

A college or university education has an undeniable value both to the student and to the society as a whole. But should either party bear a disproportionate share of the cost of the education?  Of course not.  The challenge for policy makers in the provincial government and at the university and the colleges in the ...

The Sir Robert Bond Papers: Some inconvenient truths: goring some educational sacred cows #nlpoli

Friday turned out to be Post-Secondary Education Day with a post here on the impact of the freeze on tuition fees and a fascinating Telegram article on the Conservatives’ 2011 campaign pledge to replace student loans with needs-based grants. Tuition was a bit of an issue in the 2001 provincial general election.  The Tory pledge ...

From Orangutan: Mainstream headlines demonize Quebec student protesters (again!)

(video – 5 mars 2013, Montréal. Ostie d’grosse manif de soir contre la hausse éternelle from Mario Jean on Vimeo.) Tuesday, March 5, 2013, marked the rebirth of Montreal nocturnal protests against the commodification of university education. Below are a few of the sensationalist headlines (linked) that appeared in some of the city’s mainstream news outlets ...

From Orangutan: Mainstream headlines demonize Quebec student protesters (again!)

(video – 5 mars 2013, Montréal. Ostie d’grosse manif de soir contre la hausse éternelle from Mario Jean on Vimeo.) Tuesday, March 5, 2013, marked the rebirth of Montreal nocturnal protests against the commodification of university education. Below are a few of the sensationalist headlines (linked) that appeared in some of the city’s mainstream news outlets ...