Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Mike Savage and John Hills write about the respective takes on the sources of inequality provided by Tony Atkinson, Thomas Piketty and Joseph Stiglitz. And Michael Spence discusses how economic development needs to be inclusive and based on trust in order to be sustainable: First, as we concluded ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – George Eaton discusses how some U.S. state governments are taking steps to fight inequality with taxes at the top of the income scale. – The Canadian Coalition for Tax Fairness is coming together to push for a tax system where everybody pays their fair share (including changes ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – George Monbiot offers his suggestion for a new political narrative to build a better world than the one currently dominated by neoliberalism: (B)y coming together to revive community life we, the heroes of this story, can break the vicious circle. Through invoking our capacity for togetherness and belonging, ...

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: “Just Let Go” Doesn’t Work When a Loved One is Medically Complex

Jessica McLean is a writer who cares for her Mom. I asked Jess to write about the challenges of letting go and trusting others with her Mom’s care. “Just letting go” doesn’t work when a loved one is medically complex, as Jess learned. A few years ago, my mother ended up in the ICU with ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Ryan Meili writes about the fundamental importance of trust in both politics and medicine – and the corrosive effects of corporate donations in both: When we talk about the problems with political donations, we’re not really talking about campaign financing. We’re talking about something much more fundamental. We’re ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – In the wake of a thoroughly disappointing budget day at both the provincial and federal levels, it’s worth taking note of Ivan Sigal’s view on the importance of building trust – rather than limiting citizens to either fake news or fake policies: How do we begin to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jonathan Charlton interviews Danielle Martin about the health benefits of eliminating poverty. And the Equality Trust studies expenditures by household income level, finding among other areas of gross inequality that the rich are able to spend more on restaurants than the poor are able to put toward ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Tom Parkin calls out the Libs’ latest laughable excuse for breaking their promise of electoral reform – being the threat that a party like the one which just held power for 10 years might win a few seats. Andrew Coyne notes that we shouldn’t accept Justin Trudeau’s bogeyman ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Stephen Dubner discusses the importance of social trust in supporting a functional economy and society: (S)ocial trust is … HALPERN: Social trust is an extraordinarily interesting variable and it doesn’t get anywhere near the attention it deserves. But the basic idea is trying to understand what is ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Paolo Giuliano and Antonio Spilimbergo study (PDF) how the economic conditions an individual’s youth influence enduring values – and find that the experience of an economic shock tends to lead to a greater appreciation of a fair redistribution of resources: Consistent with theories of social psychology, this ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Andrew Jackson discusses the challenge of ensuring that stable jobs are available in Canada: Good jobs are a central mechanism in the creation of shared prosperity. What matters for workers is not just being able to find any job but also security of employment, level of pay, working conditions, and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Elizabeth Renzetti makes clear that we can’t count on one-time crowdsourcing to perform the same function as a social safety net: This is the problem with the wildly popular new online world of what you might call misery fundraising: It semi-solves one small problem while leaving the system ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – David Atkins highlights Gallup’s latest polling showing that U.S. trust in public institutions continues to erode. And Paul Krugman notes that there’s reason for skepticism about the snake oil being peddled as economic policy in order to further enrich the already-wealthy: Why, after all, should anyone believe at ...

Dead Wild Roses: The DWR Sunday Religious Disservice – Can We Trust Scientists?

  Damn right we can, as long the evidence they present present the most accurate view of reality.  Religious claims do not do a good job of describing the reality we live in, they are inaccurate, rely on hearsay and reflect an ignorant and scared world view. Filed under: Religion Tagged: Science, The DWR Sunday ...

daveberta.ca - Alberta politics: Tory culture of entitlement a big problem for Jim Prentice

TweetWhoever leads Alberta’s long-governing Progressive Conservatives into the next election (probably Jim Prentice) will have some serious challenges to deal with. After more than forty years in office, Alberta’s natural governing party has become accustomed to getting its way, regardless of who stands in their way. Perhaps realizing how much damage this has caused his party, interim ...

Things Are Good: Smart People Trust Others

Oxford University researchers have concluded that the more intelligent a person is the more likely they are to trust other people. This is assumed to be the case because smarter people have a better at determining what sort of people they want to be around and self-select to be around people who can indeed be ...

Susan on the Soapbox: The Edelman Trust Barometer: Who do you trust?

The 2014 Edelman Trust Barometer is here and it’s good news—unless you work in government or business in which case you’re facing what Edelman delicately calls “a significant trust deficit”. Edelman is a global public relations company that surveys trust levels across 27 countries by asking the public who they trust and how much they ...

CuriosityCat: Stephen Harper’s Achilles heel: Trust

The latest Angus Reid poll highlights the Achilles heel of Prime Minister Stephen Harper: Most Canadians do not trust him to protect our elections, as Susan Delacourt points out. This is a stark finding of the Angus Reid poll: The views of an increasingly larger number of Canadians have hardened about Harper’s likeability, trustworthiness, and ...

eaves.ca: What Werewolf teaches us about Trust & Security

After sharing the idea behind this post with Bruce Schneier, I’ve been encouraged to think a little more about what Werewolf can teach us about trust, security and rational choices in communities that are, or are at risk of, being infiltrated by a threat. I’m not a security expert, but I do spend a lot of ...

LeDaro: Stephen Harper Loves Cats?

Do cats trust him?

LeDaro: Nicolas Sarkozy does not trust his own people

Watch the video below and you would know what I mean.

Politics Canada: Attack ad script on Harper’s trust issue

Here is a script for an attack ad which illustrates Stephen Harper’s trust issues: VIDEO AUDIO Camera up on Slick game show host in studio holding cue cards, smiling at the camera. HOST: Welcome back to Canada in Jeopardy! Mark it’s your board. CUT TO: Contestant looking up at the board, holding buzzer. MARK: Harper ...