Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Alex Boutilier discusses the glaring gap between hype and reality when it comes to tech sector jobs. And Virgina Eubanks writes about the futility of expecting miracles from algorithms in allocating grossly insufficient funding for social programs. – Meanwhile, Dean Baker argues that if anybody should face ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Tom Parkin discusses the need for a new Tommy Douglas to start leading the way toward national social programs – and the hope that Andrea Horwath can earn that role in Ontario’s provincial election: Since Douglas’s time, Canadian health care has been defended from periodic rounds of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Scott Gilmore discusses how Canada is actually backsliding in some crucial development goals. And Colin Gordon writes about the inequality growing on multiple fronts around the globe. – Kathy Tomlinson uncovers a Vancouver real estate market rigged to benefit developers and speculators. And Ryan Cooper points out ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Simon Enoch offers his take on Saskatchewan’s latest budget – including what little the Saskatchewan Party has learned, and how much it’s still getting wrong: (W)hile the 2018 budget is more measured in that it doesn’t replicate a 2017 budget that saw cuts and tax increases land disproportionately ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Scott Moe’s first budget is just more of the same in leaving Saskatchewan’s low-income residents behind in the face of rising costs of living. For further reading…– D.C. Fraser’s general report on the budget is here. – The inflation data cited in the column is here, while basic information on the Saskatchewan ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Matthew Yglesias examines the direct effects of social programs, and finds there’s every reason to invest more in them: Mercury emissions (mostly from coal plants) end up in the water, where they end up in fish, from whence they end up in the bloodstreams of children and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – Charlie May writes that the inequality which is radically reshaping the American political scene receives short shrift compared to other stories. And Thomas Piketty studies (PDF) the political realignment which is seeing relatively well-defined class politics replaced with “multiple-elite” models. – Meanwhile, Tom Parkin notes that Justin Trudeau’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Lana Payne offers her take on the need for Canada to catch up to the rest of the developed world in providing social supports: Canada is sitting at a dismal 17 per cent, down at the bottom of the pack with Ireland, Israel, and Latvia. No bragging ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on Canada’s failure to live up to our self-image as a generous and compassionate country – and the reality that we have plenty of fiscal capacity to close the gap. For further reading…– The abstract for the JAMA article referenced in the column is here, and has already been the subject of comment by ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Nathaniel Lewis laments the state of the U.S.’ woefully insufficient social supports, while emphasizing the importance of public social spending in particular: (P)rivate “social spending” is, for the most part, regressive and narrowly distributed. Households are bearing the cost directly for the goods and services that they themselves ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Andre Picard notes that contrary to our self-image, Canada actually lags behind international peers in health and social spending. And PressProgress points out the same conclusion in new OECD research. – Andrew Mitrovica writes that Doug Ford’s ascendancy in Ontario politics suggests that Canada is catching the Trump ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ann Pettifor rightly questions the supposed gains from austerity in belatedly balancing budgets only at the expense of avoidable social devastation. And the CCPA documents the billions of dollars in lost assets and thousands of jobs slashed in Saskatchewan even when Brad Wall was promising not to attack ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Livia Gershon discusses why relative equality plays a far greater role in people’s well-being than absolute income in developed countries. And Stefanie Stantcheva writes about the cultural roots of the U.S.’ relative acceptance of extreme inequality (though it’s worth noting that even in the U.S. public preferences are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Elizabeth Piper reports on Jeremy Corbyn’s much-needed declaration that under a Labour government, the financial sector will serve the public rather than the other way around. And George Monbiot comments on the role the left needs to play in reversing the accumulation of wealth and power: (O)nce ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Anna Coote discusses some of the potential problems with a universal basic income on its own – particularly to the extent it takes momentum away from the prospect of universal basic services. – Scott Sinclair examines how little has changed – and how many substantial dangers haven’t – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Noam Scheiber and Ben Casselman comment on the role of corporate consolidation in undermining pay and working conditions. And Meagan Day rebuts the claim that employers can be excused for ignoring not-yet-qualified pools of workers by pointing out that the same people once treated as unqualified are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Joseph Stiglitz discusses how the Republicans’ tax scam is designed for the sole purpose of further enriching their already-wealthy donors, while Theodoric Meyer notes that it also stands to make loads of money for lobbyists. – Jagmeet Singh makes the case for Canada to work on a tax ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Richard Partington writes that the poorest Britons stand to bear the brunt of the next wave of technological change through further diminished employment prospects. But Peter Goodman points out that a stronger social safety net in Sweden (among other countries) tends to ensure that workers share in the ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Quebec’s latest poverty plan falls far short of the “basic income” title it’s received in some national coverage – and on how we should insist on political leadership toward the genuine article. For further reading…– CBC has reported on the new plan and the response it’s received, as well as the draconian ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Toby Sanger discusses how the Trudeau Libs’ obsession with privatized infrastructure only stands to put control over public services in the hands of corporate predators: Corporations are sitting on hundreds of billions of excess cash in Canada and trillions worldwide — money they aren’t putting into productive investments. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Matt Bruenig writes about the U.S.’ alarming growth in student debt – which combined with diminished career prospects is leading to dim future outlooks for far too many young workers. And Eric Grenier’s look at the latest release of data from Canada’s 2016 census shows a stark ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – George Monbiot writes that the erosion of government for the public good stands to lead to an authoritarian state: All that remain as widely shared, commonly accepted sources of national pride are our public services: the NHS, the BBC, the education system, social security, our great libraries and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Canadians for Tax Fairness discusses the appallingly small tax contributions made by Canada’s largest companies, the vast majority of whom have foreign subsidiaries to avoid paying their fair share. – Meanwhile, Robert de Vries and Aaron Reeves point out the unfortunate reality that far too many people ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Jeremy Nuttall interviews Nelson Wiseman about the Libs’ attempts to spin their way out of a trumped-up tax controversy – and how they’re making matters worse in the process. And Murray Dobbin points out that there’s a long way to go in making sure the wealthy pay their ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Michael Paarlberg discusses how the ratchet effect is making American health care far more durable than Republicans may have realized – while recognizing that there’s a lesson to be drawn for the design of other social programs as to the value of a broad constituency of support. – ...