Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Noah Smith makes the case for the U.S. Democrats to emphasize trust-busting as a means of restoring power to people rather than the business lobby: Big companies often argue that mergers will allow increased economies of scale, whose efficiencies will more than cancel out any price rise ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2017 Links

The latest from the federal NDP’s leadership campaign. – Alex Ballingall reports on Guy Caron’s infrastructure and jobs plan which features both a large investment in public works, and substantial improvements in both wages and working conditions under federal jurisdiction. – Thomas Walkom criticizes Singh’s plan to roll Old Age Security into a means-tested benefit. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2017 Links

The latest from the federal NDP’s leadership campaign. – Alex Ballingall reports on Niki Ashton’s environmental platform which identifies corporate greed as a major obstacle to environmental justice, and proposes a new Crown corporation to ensure public investment in response. Manishna Krishnan examines Jagmeet Singh’s plan to end racial profiling, while Doug King comments on ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the noteworthy successes of the first year of Regina’s Housing First program – along with the appalling failure of our provincial and municipal governments to fund a full version. For further reading…– CBC reported on the program as it was introduced, while Kendall Latimer followed up with a report from this week’s anniversary ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the noteworthy contrast in positions on income supports in the NDP’s leadership campaign (and particularly the recent debate in Saskatoon). For further reading…– Jeremy Nuttall discussed the state of the campaign prior to Tuesday’s debate. And Peter Zimonjic offered a summary of the debate.  – I’d previously blogged here about the difference between ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Colin Gordon discusses how contempt for democracy is one of the uniting principles of the right around the globe while reviewing Nancy MacLean’s Democracy in Chains: At the intersection of Buchanan’s market fundamentalism and his embrace of Jim Crow lies a fundamental reservation — nakedly evident on today’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Owen Jones writes that UK Labour’s bold and progressive platform was crucial to its improved electoral results. Bhaksar Sunkara rightly sees Labour’s campaign – in both its firm defence of the common good, and its determination to reach young and marginalized voters rather than assuming they won’t turn ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Don Pittis discusses the growing price everybody pays for more extreme weather events caused by climate change. And Adrienne Lafrance offers a grim look at what’s in store if we can’t curb greenhouse gas emissions in a hurry. – Seth Klein and Shannon Daub write that British Columbia’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Barbara Ellen questions the positive spin the right tries to put on poverty and precarity, and writes that we’re all worse off forcing people to just barely get by: In recent times, there has been a lot said about those people who are “just managing”. They are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Nick Falvo lists ten things to know about social programs in Canada. And Mike Crawley offers a painful example of Ontario’s social safety net and employment law both falling short, as injured workers are forced to go to work even when ill or injured in the absence of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Clive Hamilton discusses the accelerating calamity of climate change which we’re allowing to happen: Our best scientists tell us insistently that a calamity is unfolding, that the life-support systems of the Earth are being damaged in ways that threaten our survival. Yet in the face of these facts ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Daniel Munro highlights how Uber and other service apps manipulate their workers. And The New York Times’ editorial board warns about the false promises of the gig economy: In reality, there is no utopia at companies like Uber, Lyft, Instacart and Handy, whose workers are often manipulated ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Abi Wilkinson writes about the importance of making social benefits universal in order to reflect a sense of shared interests and purpose: Universal aspects of the welfare state tend to be thought of as the fruit of common endeavour. The NHS tops the list of things that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Ethan Cox reports on new polling showing that Canadians are highly concerned about inequality – even if our governments aren’t doing anywhere meaningful to address it: Of Canadians surveyed, 73 per cent said their and their family’s economic situation had stayed the same or gotten worse over the ...

Accidental Deliberations: On bodily integrity

It was bad enough when the Saskatchewan Party declared its intention to put as many barriers as possible in the way of access to social services, particularly by making excuses about whether people are “able-bodied”. But it’s even worse that the responsibility for applying that standard lies with a minister who apparently doesn’t know the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Julia Smith argues that one of the primary responses to the recent reports about banks exploiting consumers (and pressuring staff to carry out their plans) should be a drive to organize workers: Banking is often viewed as an industry offering secure white-collar jobs with good wages. In ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Vicki Nash challenges the claim that unemployment in a precarious economy is generally a matter of choice rather than the absence thereof. And Jia Tolentino argues that we shouldn’t pretend there’s any value in being forced to work oneself to death: It does require a fairly dystopian strain ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – CBC reports on Nav Persaud’s research showing how universal prescription drug coverage could produce improved health outcomes for a lower cost. But Scott Sinclair and Stuart Trew note that the Libs are instead taking us in the opposite direction with a combination of trade deals which tie governments’ ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – CBC reports on Nav Persaud’s research showing how universal prescription drug coverage could produce improved health outcomes for a lower cost. But Scott Sinclair and Stuart Trew note that the Libs are instead taking us in the opposite direction with a combination of trade deals which tie governments’ ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Evening Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Linda McQuaig discusses the hollow promise of “populist” billionaires who ultimately serve only to enrich themselves and their class. And Lana Payne writes about the growing protest movement which culminated in massive rallies around the world this weekend – as well as the causes of its emergence: Over ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Colin Busby and Ramya Muthukumaran offer some suggestions as to how to ensure there’s an adequate social safety net to support people stuck with precarious work: Federal and provincial governments, acting in concert or independently, should reduce the uncertainties of a volatile labour market for newcomers and incumbents. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – David Brin examines the crucial role the public sector plays in driving economic development – as well as the disturbingly large movement seeking to end any further progress – Anna Gorman reports on California’s ambitious plans to improve the health and social welfare of its most vulnerable ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones argues that UK Labour needs to make far more effort to connect with working-class citizens in order to hold off the populist right, while Jamelle Bouie examines Jesse Jackson’s presidential campaigns as a worthwhile model for uniting groups of disaffected voters. And Wolfgang Munchau comments ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Evening Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – The Star argues that Canada can’t afford to leave tax loopholes wide open for the rich – as the Libs are doing in violation of their campaign promises. And Martin Lukacs notes that obscene giveaways to the rich seem to be the top priority for Justin Trudeau ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Andrew Jackson writes that the Libs’ fall economic statement represents a massive (and unjustified) shift away from promised infrastructure funding even while planning to privatize both existing operations and future developments. And Joie Warnock highlights why it would represent nothing short of scandalous mismanagement for the Wall ...