Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Patrick Gossage discusses the desperate need for Canadian governments at all levels to take meaningful action to eliminate poverty: The reality is that low-income Canadians are invisible and lack political clout. In Toronto, they are concentrated in downtown areas close to the gleaming bank towers, in huge clusters ...

Accidental Deliberations: Deep thought

Some people are concerned about the Senate’s self-definition as a council of owls seeking to keep less-privileged citizens from governing in their own interests. But have they considered this might be a perfectly fair description?

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Paul Krugman notes that after promising to bring some outside perspective to politics, Donald Trump is instead offering only a warmed-over version of the Republicans’ typical voodoo economics. And John Cassidy highlights how Trump’s plan appears to be nothing more than to wage class warfare on behalf of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – The Star’s editorial board writes that it’s long past time for governments to stand up for people facing precarious work: (P)recarious workers, many of them millennials, have been largely left behind by legislators who say the shift is inevitable and there’s nothing much that can or ought to ...

Accidental Deliberations: On corruptible structures

Yes, there’s no doubt that Kevin O’Leary’s suggestion of selling off Senate appointments is nothing short of asinine. That’s not so much because the idea is inherently unconstitutional, but because of its substantive implications. The sale of Senate seats it would involve institutionalizing the worst aspects of the Senate’s historical purpose (creating a systemic on ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Valerie Strauss discusses the disastrous effects of corporatized education in the U.S. And Alex Hemingway examines how B.C.’s government (like Saskatchewan’s) is going out of its way to make it impossible for a public education system to do its job of offering a bright future to all ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the Senate’s recent attempts to claim any relevance to Canadian politics, and what they should tell us about the failures of our actual elected representatives. For further reading…– OpenParliament’s status report on Bill C-14 (featuring the votes from the House of Commons) is here. Catherine Tunney reported on the Senate’s debate on amendments ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Andrew Coyne argues that the Senate’s role in overruling elected representatives – which only seems to be growing under the Trudeau Libs – represents an affront to democracy. And Duncan Cameron has some suggestions beyond proportional representation as to how our electoral system can better live up ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – David Crane identifies the good news in the Parliamentary Budget Officer’s report on climate change – which is that we can meet our greenhouse gas emissions targets through readily feasible policy choices as long as our federal government cares enough to make them. And Steven Staples points out ...

Accidental Deliberations: On common values

There’s reason to be wary about the Libs’ handling of the Senate, as Thomas Walkom writes in his latest column. But it’s also worth noting that contrary to Walkom’s conflation of the two, there are important differences between selecting prospective Senators based on whether they “back the Liberal government”, versus evaluating whether they are “amenable ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones writes that the UK’s flooding is just one example of what happens when the public sector which is supposed to look out for the common good is slashed out of short-term political calculation. And J. Bradford Delong observes that the choice between an economy that ...

The Tory Pirate - Politics & Policy: The NDP "is not planning any changes to our current form of the parliamentary system" 

It is not often I get to talk about issues related to the monarchy on this blog. I mostly keep that on the other blog I writefor. However the Monarchist League of Canada recently surveyed the main federal parties on their views towards theCanadian Monarchy. One of the answers was curious though. The NDP’s reply ...

Pushed to the Left and Loving It: So Who’s the Dictator Now?

Recenty, former NDP MP, Bruce Hyer, has come out to the press about his former boss’s dictatorial style and problems he had with honesty; evident in the way that he is constantly contradicting himself. When asked during his interview with Peter Mansbridge about this, Mulcair only said that Hyer did not want to vote with ...

Pushed to the Left and Loving It: So Who’s the Dictator Now?

Recenty, former NDP MP, Bruce Hyer, has come out to the press about his former boss’s dictatorial style and problems he had with honesty; evident in the way that he is constantly contradicting himself. When asked during his interview with Peter Mansbridge about this, Mulcair only said that Hyer did not want to vote with ...

Pushed to the Left and Loving It: So Who’s the Dictator Now?

Recenty, former NDP MP, Bruce Hyer, has come out to the press about his former boss’s dictatorial style and problems he had with honesty; evident in the way that he is constantly contradicting himself. When asked during his interview with Peter Mansbridge about this, Mulcair only said that Hyer did not want to vote with ...

Accidental Deliberations: On caretakers

Since there’s been plenty of talk lately about caretaker governments and their duty to exercise restraint, I’ll raise one question as to the appointments made the last time a new federal government took office. The day he and his Cabinet were sworn in, and two months before Parliament convened following the 2006 federal election, Stephen ...

Accidental Deliberations: On practical changes

One of the main attacks on the NDP’s election platform has been the question of what support there is for the constitutional change required to abolish the Senate. But it’s worth distinguishing between the relatively limited constitutional role actually mandated for the Senate which requires following the constitutional amendment formula, and other past practices and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Thomas Walkom discusses how Canadian workers are feeling the pain of decades of policy designed to suppress wages – and notes there’s plenty more all parties should be doing to change that reality. And Doug Saunders points out what we should want our next federal government to pursue ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Ian Welsh rightly points out how our lives are shaped by social facts far beyond individual’s control: If you are homeless in America, know that there are five times as many empty homes as there are homeless people. If you are homeless in Europe, know that there are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Philip Berger and Lisa Simon discuss the health and social benefits of a guaranteed annual income: At the community level, poverty also has deep and lasting impacts — some visible, some not. We’ve seen these visible impacts in Simcoe County Ontario, where one of us works. One in ...

Mind Bending Politics: Harper’s House of Cards is Falling Down

If you haven’t tuned into the Duffy trial over the past week, than you are living under a rock, or you’re missing one of the best political dramas in Canadian history.  The cross examination of Nigel Wright in Senator Mike Duffy’s trial over inappropriate expenses, is becoming quite interesting to many Canadians.  Canada seems to ...

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Harper Lied In The House

Check out @LeslieCBC’s Tweet: What the PM said then, and how it stacks up against evidence submitted in court: @pnpcbc #Duffy fact check #cdnpoli http://t.co/okoZsW4OBB — Leslie Stojsic (@LeslieCBC) August 14, 2015 Duffy’s trial is giving facts about Harper’s criminal gang in his office.

Accidental Deliberations: On points of agreement

Let’s see if we can turn Stephen Harper’s otherwise laughable spin on his PMO’s widespread cover-up into a couple of points we can all agree on. First, the ultimate responsibility for lies and cover-ups lies with superiors rather than subordinates – in Harper’s own words: Second, exactly one person fits bears that responsibility when it ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Althia Raj, Karl Nerenberg, Tim Harper, Jennifer Ditchburn and Kristy Kirkup, Lee Berthiaume and Jason Fekete, PressProgress and CTV News all point out some of the more noteworthy aspects of Nigel Wright’s testimony in Mike Duffy’s trial (along with the large amount of material brought to light as ...

Accidental Deliberations: Good to go

A few images which may or may not become highly relevant in just a few minutes.