Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Richard Partington writes that the poorest Britons stand to bear the brunt of the next wave of technological change through further diminished employment prospects. But Peter Goodman points out that a stronger social safety net in Sweden (among other countries) tends to ensure that workers share in the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Bessma Momani writes that Donald Trump’s plan to leave the U.S. at the mercy of unregulated financial markets figures to cause another crisis comparable to – or worse than – that of 2008: Nearly 10 years ago, the U.S. financial industry was exposed as a glorified Ponzi ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Sean McElwee offers his take on the crucial failings which have led the U.S. Democrats to their current nadir in which principles and values have been discarded in the pursuit of power they’ve failed to secure. – Mike Konczal and Marshall Steinbaum highlight the importance of effective government ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jonathan Sas highlights why we’re best off having public services delivered by the public sector: The three decades long bashing and diminishing of the redistributive capacities of the state has led to pronounced inequality, degraded infrastructure stock, and a blunted ability of government to respond to current societal ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones discusses the UK’s experience with privatized rail as yet another example of how vital services become more costly and worse-run when put in corporate hands. – Sean McElwee highlights still more research showing that right-wing government tends to fail even on its own terms, with ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones discusses the UK’s experience with privatized rail as yet another example of how vital services become more costly and worse-run when put in corporate hands. – Sean McElwee highlights still more research showing that right-wing government tends to fail even on its own terms, with ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading: – Ross Douthat (!) discusses the distinction between actual cosmopolitanism, and the global elitism that’s instead come to dominate international power relations: Genuine cosmopolitanism is a rare thing. It requires comfort with real difference, with forms of life that are truly exotic relative to one’s own. It takes ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Ed Finn discusses how to fight for needed alternatives to neoliberalism in the face of seemingly daunting odds and structural barriers. – Noah Smith points out how most economic analysis omits important social factors which ultimately matter far more to people than marginal GDP. And as a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Brian Nolan, Max Roser, and Stefan Thewissen study (PDF) the relationship between GDP and household income across the OECD, and find a nearly universal pattern of nominal economic growth which isn’t finding its way into households (which is particularly extreme in the U.S.). Roy van der Weide, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your wek. – Maia Szalavitz discusses the connection between unemployment, inequality and addictions, noting in particular that uncertainty and stress in other areas of an individual’s life make addition recovery far more difficult: The relationship between addiction rates and inequality has long been noted by researchers who study its health effects: ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Nick Dearden discusses how the latest wave of corporate power agreements – including the CETA – stands to undermine democracy in participating countries: Like the US deal, Ceta contains a new legal system, open only to foreign corporations and investors. Should the British government make a decision, say, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Martin Regg Cohn exposes the Ontario Libs’ pay-to-play governing strategy, as cabinet ministers have been instructed to use their roles and access to meet fund-raising targets of up to half a million dollars per year. And Gary Mason reports that privileged access to Christy Clark is likewise ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Sean McElwee examines how the wealthy control the U.S.’ political system, while public opinion plays far too little role in policy choices: A comprehensive study by Grossmann finds that public opinion was a significant factor in 25 percent of policy changes since 1945. More influential factors have included ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Sarah Anderson, Marc Bayard, John Cavanagh, Chuck Collins, Josh Hoxie and Sam Pizzigati offer an outline as to how to fight back against growing inequality: § We need to see inequality as a deep systemic problem. Piecemeal interventions have not helped slow or reverse the pace of wealth ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Julie Delahanty comments on Canada’s crisis of inequality and poverty. And Sean McElwee highlights how the ill-founded belief that income inequality is more a matter of merit than luck tends to lead people to accept far more of it than should be tolerable. – Susan Riley rightly ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Will Wachtmeister reviews Malcolm Torry’s book of arguments for a basic income, focusing in particular on social cohesion and innovation as important reasons why individuals should enjoy economic security. But Sean McElwee and Jason McDaniel write that the U.S. Republicans (among other parties) are looking to play ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Jordon Cooper offers his take on the many social issues we should be addressing alongside our work to welcome Syrian refugees: All levels of government have passed resolutions to end child poverty in Canada and have done almost nothing to back it up. There has been the occasional ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Robert Reich discusses the unfairness of requiring workers to take all the risk of precarious jobs while sharing few of the rewards: On demand and on call – in the “share” economy, the “gig” economy, or, more prosaically, the “irregular” economy – the result is the same: no predictable earnings ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Greg Keenan exposes how corporations are demanding perpetually more from municipalities while refusing to contribute their fair share of taxes to fund the services needed by any community. And Sean McElwee points out how big-money donations are translating into a warped U.S. political system: Available data reveals ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – The World Bank’s latest World Development Report discusses how readily-avoidable scarcity in severely limit individual development. Melissa Kearney and Philip Levine write that poverty and a lack of social mobility tend to create a vicious cycle of despair. And James Ridgeway examines the deliberate interference aimed at ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Erika Shaker points out how condescending attitudes toward public benefits are both making it unduly difficult to develop new programs which would benefit everybody, and threatening existing social safety net. Sean McElwee writes that inequality only figures to grow as an issue as the wealthy try to disassociate ...