Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – David Olive offers his take on what a basic income should look like – and is optimistic that Ontario’s ongoing experiment should hit the mark: A UBI would be pointless in the absence of existing supports. In the Ontario pilot projects, the payout for a single person ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – In the wake of a thoroughly disappointing budget day at both the provincial and federal levels, it’s worth taking note of Ivan Sigal’s view on the importance of building trust – rather than limiting citizens to either fake news or fake policies: How do we begin to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Katie Allen reports on the growing gap between the privileged few and the working class in the UK. And Frank Elgar highlights how we all pay the price of inequality, even as our governments can’t be bothered to rein it in: For decades, the IMF, OECD, and World ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Robert Reich comments on the absurdity of Donald Trump’s plan to shovel yet more money toward a military-industrial complex and corporate profiteers who already have more than they know what to do with. – Sara Fraser and Laura Chapin write that food insecurity is primarily an issue of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Wanda Wyporska writes that growing inequality is primarily the result of political choices: If it seems ridiculous that 1,000 people work harder or offer more value than 40 per cent of the population, that’s because it is. This level of inequality isn’t natural or desirable, it’s not about ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – The Star’s editorial board calls for an end to regressive federal tax breaks. And Dennis Howlett asks why the tax evaders who used KPMG’s illegal offshoring schemes are being offered secrecy and amnesty for their attempts to siphon revenue away from the Canadian public. – Michael Butler discusses ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – The Star’s editorial board calls for an end to regressive federal tax breaks. And Dennis Howlett asks why the tax evaders who used KPMG’s illegal offshoring schemes are being offered secrecy and amnesty for their attempts to siphon revenue away from the Canadian public. – Michael Butler discusses ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Duncan Cameron writes that democratic socialism can produce a fair economy for everybody. And the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives puts the possibilities in concrete terms with its alternative federal budget. – Armine Yalnizyan argues that it’s long past time for a budget focused on gender equality. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Duncan Cameron writes that democratic socialism can produce a fair economy for everybody. And the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives puts the possibilities in concrete terms with its alternative federal budget. – Armine Yalnizyan argues that it’s long past time for a budget focused on gender equality. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Lawrence Mishel and Heidi Shierholz write that we shouldn’t let governments and businesses off the hook for regressive policy choices by blaming technology. And Ben Tarnoff points out that any effects on the distribution of income and wealth can be dealt with through a fair tax system. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Lawrence Mishel and Heidi Shierholz write that we shouldn’t let governments and businesses off the hook for regressive policy choices by blaming technology. And Ben Tarnoff points out that any effects on the distribution of income and wealth can be dealt with through a fair tax system. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – François Côté-Vaillancourt suggests a greater focus on redistributing wealth and income to ensure a secure standard of living, rather than seeking primarily to put people to work: (I)nstead of fighting job losses, I would suggest that maybe the most important thing we could do would be to raise ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – François Côté-Vaillancourt suggests a greater focus on redistributing wealth and income to ensure a secure standard of living, rather than seeking primarily to put people to work: (I)nstead of fighting job losses, I would suggest that maybe the most important thing we could do would be to raise ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Dietrich Vollrath discusses both what’s included in our societal capital, and how best to think of redistributive policies as means of fairly dealing with it: (T)axes are a way of collecting the royalties on trust and scale that we inherited and/or create ourselves. Taxes are the rents ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Dietrich Vollrath discusses both what’s included in our societal capital, and how best to think of redistributive policies as means of fairly dealing with it: (T)axes are a way of collecting the royalties on trust and scale that we inherited and/or create ourselves. Taxes are the rents ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Paul Wells discusses how the Justin Trudeau Libs have been reduced to bluster and reannouncements as a substitute for their promise of improved equality. And Michael Harris notes that some of the people who were crucial to Trudeau’s election in B.C. are seeing through his dishonesty. – Meanwhile, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Paul Wells discusses how the Justin Trudeau Libs have been reduced to bluster and reannouncements as a substitute for their promise of improved equality. And Michael Harris notes that some of the people who were crucial to Trudeau’s election in B.C. are seeing through his dishonesty. – Meanwhile, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Paul Buchheit comments on the continued spread of global inequality – as a combination of top-heavy gains and lost wealth among all but the privileged few has reduced to 6 the number of billionaires with as much wealth as half of humanity. – Bill Curry reports on ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jonathan Charlton interviews Danielle Martin about the health benefits of eliminating poverty. And the Equality Trust studies expenditures by household income level, finding among other areas of gross inequality that the rich are able to spend more on restaurants than the poor are able to put toward ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Kate Pickett and Richard Wilkinson comment on the moral and practical harm done by continued inequality: Inequality matters because, as a robust and growing body of evidence shows, the populations of societies with bigger income differences tend to have poorer physical and mental health, more illicit drug use, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Naomi Klein writes that Donald Trump’s cabinet represents a direct takeover of the U.S. government by the corporate oligarchy – and comments on what the progressive movement needs to do to fight back: Let us be clear: This is not a peaceful transition of power. It’s a corporate ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Liam Byrne argues that it’s long past time to reevaluate an economic framework which has produced only highly concentrated wealth for a lucky few at everybody else’s expense. And Graeme Wearden reports on Oxfam’s call to rein in both firm-level tax avoidance, and government policy oriented toward eliminating ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Per Molander examines new research on the sources of inequality which concludes that massive gaps in wealth and income inevitably arise purely out of chance rather than any individual merit: Differences in income or assets that are based on differences in capabilities or effort are widely considered to ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, starting from the justified criticism of corporate-friendly “privatize the gains, socialize the losses” economic policy by noting that some genuinely socialized risks would represent a substantial improvement in equity. For further reading…– Again, Jared Bernstein discusses the shift in overall risks toward the people who can least handle them here.– And Timothy Martin wrote ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Anis Chowdhury refutes the theory that top-heavy tax cuts have anything to do with economic development: Cross-country research has found no relationship between changes in top marginal tax rates and growth between 1960 and 2010. For example, during this period, the US cut its top rate by ...