Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Brian Wakamo notes that Kirsten Gillibrand is pushing for postal banking in the U.S. as an alternative to predatory lenders in underserved communities. – Glen Hodgson discusses the rising fiscal costs of climate change – even as the Trudeau Libs plan to put public money into exacerbating ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – The CCPA offers some questions and answers on the problems with “social impact bonds” designed to turn the delivery of needed programming into a source of corporate profits. And Andy Blatchford reports on the Trudeau Libs’ secretive attempt to undermine any prospect of prosecutions for corporate crimes. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – The Equality Trust highlights the perpetual concentration of wealth among an extremely privileged few in the UK. LOLGOP points out how U.S. Republicans would rather let people die than see them adequately sustained by a fair minimum wage and secure social supports. And Paul Solman writes about the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Gary Younge comments on the highly selective willingness of far too many privileged people to acknowledge suffering around them. And Paul Krugman calls out the Trump administration’s gratuitous cruelty toward the people who already have the least: There’s something fundamentally obscene about this spectacle. Here we have a ...

Accidental Deliberations: On full pictures

I’ve previously pointed out the obvious bad faith behind the Saskatchewan Party’s attempt (PDF) to monetize existing agricultural practices as a substitute for actually reducing greenhouse gas emissions – and particularly the one-sided nature of that plan: How we grow our crops, harvest our forests and protect our vital water systems will be critically important ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Yanis Varoufakis discusses the loss of freedom when one’s whole life needs to be planned around corporate wishes and sensitivities: A capacity to fence off a part of one’s life, and to remain sovereign and self-driven within those boundaries, was paramount to the liberal conception of the free ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Quirks & Quarks examines the potentially devastating effects of a dilbit spill on British Columbia’s coast. And David Climenhaga warns that Kinder Morgan is looking at NAFTA to provide it an alternate source of risk-free profits at public expense. – Mia Rabson reports on Canada’s continued failure to ...

Accidental Deliberations: On the social environment

Having written my column this week on one of the more glaring areas of increasingly alarming neglect from the Saskatchewan Party under Scott Moe, I’ll take a moment to point out the other single policy change that I find most striking. D.C. Fraser has reported on a reduction in funding to climate change programming, with ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Simon Enoch offers his take on Saskatchewan’s latest budget – including what little the Saskatchewan Party has learned, and how much it’s still getting wrong: (W)hile the 2018 budget is more measured in that it doesn’t replicate a 2017 budget that saw cuts and tax increases land disproportionately ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Scott Moe’s first budget is just more of the same in leaving Saskatchewan’s low-income residents behind in the face of rising costs of living. For further reading…– D.C. Fraser’s general report on the budget is here. – The inflation data cited in the column is here, while basic information on the Saskatchewan ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Lana Payne offers her take on the need for Canada to catch up to the rest of the developed world in providing social supports: Canada is sitting at a dismal 17 per cent, down at the bottom of the pack with Ireland, Israel, and Latvia. No bragging ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Mitchell Thompson discusses the absurdity of setting up Canada’s banks for collapses and bailouts, rather than ensuring they serve the public interest. And Colin Butler reports on CUPW’s continued push for a postal banking option to provide better service to far more people and communities. – Barry ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Evening Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Dick Bryan argues that the minimum wage should reflect the financial risks faced by low-wage workers, while Nick Day offers some lessons in successful economic activism from the $15 and Fairness movement. And Yasemin Besen-Cassino points out that gender-based pay inequity starts from the moment people enter ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jim Stanford discusses what can be done to make international terms of trade serve the public, rather than merely offering multinational corporations control over all participants:  Acknowledging that globalisation produces losers as well as winners, allows us to imagine policies to moderate the downsides of trade – and ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how the Boundary Dam carbon capture and storage project – cited incessantly by Scott Moe and the Saskatchewan Party as a substitute for a climate change action plan – has in fact proven a costly failure both as a power source and a means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. For further reading…– I’ve ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, expanding on these posts as to the show of strength from both Ryan Meili and Trent Wotherspoon in the NDP’s leadership campaign as compared to any of the Saskatchewan Party’s candidates – and how that enthusiasm gap may be important in contrasting Meili against Scott Moe in the years to come. For further reading, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Noortje Uphoff writes about the long-term effects of growing up in poverty and the resulting stress on a child: Our childhood affects our health across the course of our lives. Stress, it seems, is a major contributor. While a life lived with financial, educational and social security ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ann Pettifor rightly questions the supposed gains from austerity in belatedly balancing budgets only at the expense of avoidable social devastation. And the CCPA documents the billions of dollars in lost assets and thousands of jobs slashed in Saskatchewan even when Brad Wall was promising not to attack ...

Accidental Deliberations: On first choices

First-choice support for Ryan Meili in the NDP’s leadership campaign: 5,973 First-choice support for Scott Moe in the Saskatchewan Party’s leadership campaign: 4,483 Moe just barely edged past Meili’s first-ballot vote total on the Saskatchewan Party’s fourth ballot – when second- (or more likely third-)choice support shifted to him from voters trying to cut their ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here (via PressReader), on the importance of Saskatchewan’s citizens staying engaged and active – rather than viewing the end of the main parties’ leadership races as a basis to tune out until the next provincial election. For further reading…– Again, my reference page for the balance of the NDP’s leadership campaign is here.– And in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Thomas Walkom and Andre Picard took the time to wonder whether the Libs actually planned to deliver on pharmacare before Bill Morneau confirmed otherwise. – Joe Fries examines the history of P3s in British Columbia. And Alex MacPherson breaks the news that the Saskatchewan Party is planning ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Michelle Chen takes note of the influx of young energy into the U.S.’ labour movement: (I)n contrast to the myth of millennials’ being economically and politically adrift, they’re stepping in readily to fill the union ranks that have hemorrhaged middle-aged workers over the years—2017 actually saw an ...

Accidental Deliberations: On personal responsibility

Since the Saskatchewan Party’s leadership campaign didn’t do much to test Scott Moe’s track record, it will fall to the rest of us to point out the reasons why his actions need to come under careful scrutiny. And one such reason comes from Moe’s actions in threatening the provincial auditor’s funding after he was first ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, expanding on this post as to how the promises which won Scott Moe the Saskatchewan Party’s leadership will leave him with some difficult decisions to make in a hurry. For further reading…– Tammy Robert’s coverage of the leadership campaign features this gem about Moe’s substance-free campaign: Moe’s campaign is unbelievably thin gruel from a ...

Accidental Deliberations: On stopping the cuts

I’m less surprised than some by Scott Moe’s ascent to the Saskatchewan Party’s leadership in an extremely close, four-way leadership race. But it will particularly be worth keeping an eye on one aspect of the campaign which looks to have been crucial in propelling him into the Premier’s office. Unlike the other last two candidates ...