Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Katie Allen reports on the growing gap between the privileged few and the working class in the UK. And Frank Elgar highlights how we all pay the price of inequality, even as our governments can’t be bothered to rein it in: For decades, the IMF, OECD, and World ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, pointing out that Brad Wall’s deficit can be traced primarily (if not entirely) to his unproductive tax slashing – and that even an austerity-laden budget is being designed to make matters worse. For further reading…– Jason Warick’s series of reports on obvious ways to improve Saskatchewan’s fiscal situation can again be found here, here, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Josh Bivens explains why increased fairness would likely lead to improved overall growth for the U.S.’ economy: (O)ne key driver of slow productivity growth in recent years can be fixed: the remaining shortfall between aggregate demand and the economy’s productive potential. Running the economy far below potential for ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Linda McQuaig discusses the need to fight fake news about Canada’s health care system (and the corporate raiders trying to amplify it): (I)t was with some pleasure last week that I watched as a Republican congressman tried to insist that Canadians routinely flock to the U.S. for health ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the Saskatchewan Party’s determination to make work more precarious – and pay and benefits harder to come by – in the public and private sectors alike. For further reading…– The history of the Skip the Dishes saga includes the government’s plan for millions of dollars in handouts; the decision of the company not ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Jordon Cooper rightly argues that Brad Wall’s plan to slash education will only doom Saskatchewan to be further trapped in boom-and-bust resource cycles. And Toby Sanger discusses (PDF) how Saskatchewan can get back on track without imposing cruel cuts on the people who can least afford them. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how public enterprises (such as Crown corporations) and a heritage fund should both be part of a general plan to build social capital – and why the Saskatchewan Party’s deference to business stands in the way. For further reading…– Stefani Langenegger reported on yesterday’s impressive rally in support of Saskatchewan’s Crowns and public ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how public enterprises (such as Crown corporations) and a heritage fund should both be part of a general plan to build social capital – and why the Saskatchewan Party’s deference to business stands in the way. For further reading…– Stefani Langenegger reported on yesterday’s impressive rally in support of Saskatchewan’s Crowns and public ...

Accidental Deliberations: On non-solutions

Tammy Robert thoroughly documents how Brad Wall’s billion-dollar deficit has nothing to do with either resource revenues (being Wall’s primary excuse for blowing up the budget), or public services (which are his first target for attacks): I can’t consider the way the Saskatchewan government has handled the prospect of streamlining public service – or even this ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on Brad Wall’s choice to cover up the truth behind the Saskatchewan Party’s Global Transportation Hub scandal – and the most plausible (if still inadequate) explanations for that decision. For further reading…– Again, the latest public revelation was Geoff Leo’s reporting of political pressure to pay inflated prices for land. And Leo also reported ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Simon Enoch explains why the Sask Party’s plans to inflict an austerian beating until economic morale improves is doomed to failure: It is now abundantly clear that the Saskatchewan government’s “transformational change” agenda is in reality a not-so-subtle euphemism for provincewide austerity in response to the current ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Claudia Chwalisz points out that in addition to relying on a distortionary electoral system, the Trudeau Libs’ majority was built on a bubble which now seems likely to pop. Michael Harris wagers that Canadians will remember the broken core promise when they go to the polls in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Juxtaposition

So which of these quotes conflating immigration with terrorism is from the bigoted autocrat provoking protests around the world for his widely-acknowledged lack of human decency… [The leader] is calling for a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering [his country] until our country’s representatives can figure out what is going on.…[The leader] stated, “Without ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Scott Sinclair offers his take on what we can expect Donald Trump to pursue in renegotiating NAFTA, and points out that while there are some options which might boost Canadian manufacturing and other sectors, it’s also possible that matters could get far worse for the citizens of all ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Rahul Kalvapalle reports on the latest Ipsos poll showing how younger Canadians expect to lead a worse life than the generations who went before them. – PressProgress examines how inequality has been burgeoning under Christy Clark’s B.C. Lib government. And Maimuna Majumder notes that the toxic effects of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Evening Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Linda McQuaig discusses the hollow promise of “populist” billionaires who ultimately serve only to enrich themselves and their class. And Lana Payne writes about the growing protest movement which culminated in massive rallies around the world this weekend – as well as the causes of its emergence: Over ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the options available to the Wall government in responding to a budget deficit other than to renew its attacks on Saskatchewan’s public servants – and why we shouldn’t trust a premier whose answer to the failure of his anti-worker economics is to amplify the pain. For further reading…– In case we need a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – The Star argues that a crackdown on tax evasion and avoidance is a crucial first step in reining in inequality. Susan Delacourt wonders when, if ever, Chrystia Freeland’s apparent interest in inequality will show up in her role in government. And Vanmala Subramaniam reminds us why the cause ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Tom Parkin points out that neither austerity nor isolationism offers any real solution to improve Canada’s fiscal and economic standing. And Rob Carrick highlights what should be the most worrisome form of debt – being the increased consumer debt taken on to allow people to keep spending in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – David Masciotra offers a cultural case for a basic income: Reward, purpose and meaning are the abstractions meant to pacify the poor and the working class. The rich have wealth, comfort and pleasure. They also have a universal basic income. In Jacobin, Matt Bruenig recently reported that ...

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Sask Party Putting People Out of Work

The Sask Party has hit a new low. “Province laying off 251 custodial workers, “lowest paid government employees,” says union” A tender for cleaning services at SGI’s head office was sent out last week. Those being laid off work in government-owned properties, like the Legislative Building and the T.C. Douglas Building in Regina. “Unless the public ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Alex Hemingway highlights the similarities between Justin Trudeau and Donald Trump in pushing infrastructure plans designed primarily to turn the promise of public services into long-term corporate profit centres: But as I described recently in the Canadian context, these “partnerships” have proven enormously costly: “P3s are simply ...

Accidental Deliberations: On litmus tests

Gregory Beatty raises some noteworthy possibilities as to how Ryan Meili’s entry into the Saskatoon-Meewasin by-election may reverberate in Saskatchewan’s broader political scene. But there are a few more potential effects worth pointing out. For some time, there’s been a generally-unexplained combination of dismissiveness and negativity toward Meili in some corners of the media, typically ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – Owen Jones highlights the need for social democratic parties to present a real popular alternative to neoliberal government, and offers his suggestions as to how UK Labour can accomplish that: Political leadership means saying, here’s what’s wrong with society, here’s what our vision of what society is instead, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Linda McQuaig writes about the dangerous spread of privatized health care which threatens to undermine our universal system: Privatization advocates want us to believe public health care is no longer affordable. But in fact, it’s private, for-profit medicine that’s unaffordable. The publicly funded portion of our health ...