Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – David Olive offers his take on what a basic income should look like – and is optimistic that Ontario’s ongoing experiment should hit the mark: A UBI would be pointless in the absence of existing supports. In the Ontario pilot projects, the payout for a single person ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Vicki Nash challenges the claim that unemployment in a precarious economy is generally a matter of choice rather than the absence thereof. And Jia Tolentino argues that we shouldn’t pretend there’s any value in being forced to work oneself to death: It does require a fairly dystopian strain ...

Politics and its Discontents: Just A Couple Of Questions

Given that I have no background in economics, I will leave it to more finely-tuned minds to debate the merits of yesterday’s federal budget. However, there are a couple of things that, from my perspective, need to be answered, and they both relate to the Infrastructure Bank the Liberal government is touting. Introduced in last ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Josh Bivens explains why increased fairness would likely lead to improved overall growth for the U.S.’ economy: (O)ne key driver of slow productivity growth in recent years can be fixed: the remaining shortfall between aggregate demand and the economy’s productive potential. Running the economy far below potential for ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Heather Whiteside discusses how the privatization schemes being toyed with at all levels of government represent nothing more than reckless gambling with public money and goods: When a federal, provincial, or municipal government builds a bridge, a highway, a school, or a hospital, we know who owns ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Linda McQuaig discusses the need to fight fake news about Canada’s health care system (and the corporate raiders trying to amplify it): (I)t was with some pleasure last week that I watched as a Republican congressman tried to insist that Canadians routinely flock to the U.S. for health ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Erica Johnson reports that the problem of bank employees being pushed to fleece customers (legality be damned) is common to all of Canada’s major banks. And Lisa Wright reports that the result will be a national investigation. But it’s appalling that it took anonymous reports to the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Chris Dillow examines a few of the reasons why neoliberalism hasn’t produced the promise of economic growth as the supposed benefit in exchange for dissolving social links. And William Berkson discusses the importance of an activist government in building a strong economy: The new books on the history ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Chris Dillow examines a few of the reasons why neoliberalism hasn’t produced the promise of economic growth as the supposed benefit in exchange for dissolving social links. And William Berkson discusses the importance of an activist government in building a strong economy: The new books on the history ...

We Pivot: Remember When You Thought Trudeau Was Progressive?

If it isn’t his Finance Minister telling us to get used to job churn, or that the middle class isn’t a real thing with data and statistics [it’s just an aspirational ideal], it’s Trudeau outflanking the NDP in the 2015 … [Read more]

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – CBC reports on Nav Persaud’s research showing how universal prescription drug coverage could produce improved health outcomes for a lower cost. But Scott Sinclair and Stuart Trew note that the Libs are instead taking us in the opposite direction with a combination of trade deals which tie governments’ ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – CBC reports on Nav Persaud’s research showing how universal prescription drug coverage could produce improved health outcomes for a lower cost. But Scott Sinclair and Stuart Trew note that the Libs are instead taking us in the opposite direction with a combination of trade deals which tie governments’ ...

Michal Rozworski: Ours to own, not theirs to profit

It seems the public sector is under attack from all directions these days. Despite historically low public financing costs, despite proven efficiency and innovation, the public sector gets a bad rap in the public eye—something all manner of politicians from hardened right-wingers to cosmpolitan neoliberals take advantage of, letting markets further seep into the very ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – David Suzuki discusses the merits of a four-day work week in improving both working and living conditions:  It’s absurd that so many people still work eight hours a day, five days a week — or more — with only a few weeks’ vacation a year, often needing ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Louis-Philippe Rochon writes that while American voters had to know what they’d get in casting their most recent ballots, far too many Canadians may have believed the Libs’ promises of something else: On this side of the 49th parallel, however, when Canadians elected Trudeau a little over 15 ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: The Federal Role in Poverty Reduction

Over at the web site of the Calgary Homeless Foundation, I’m co-author of a blog post titled “The Federal Role in Poverty Reduction.” Points raised in the blog post include the following: -Canada’s Minister of Families, Children and Social Development has been tasked to lead the development of a Canada Poverty Reduction Strategy. -Total public ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – George Monbiot examines how politics in the UK and the U.S. are dominated by unaccountable corporate money. And Stephen Maher and B.J. Siekierski report that both the Libs and Cons are fully on board – as Rona Ambrose managed to take (however justified) umbrage at Justin Trudeau’s vacation ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Ontario’s Electricity Sector: Privatization and deregulation

We’re pleased to present this very topical post by Edgardo Sepulveda examining what has caused Ontario’s rising high electricity prices. This is Edgardo’s second guest post as a PEF member, following his, first, which was an analysis of the impact of fiscal policy changes on post-tax income distribution.  Edgardo has been an international consulting economist and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – David Masciotra offers a cultural case for a basic income: Reward, purpose and meaning are the abstractions meant to pacify the poor and the working class. The rich have wealth, comfort and pleasure. They also have a universal basic income. In Jacobin, Matt Bruenig recently reported that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Alex Hemingway highlights the similarities between Justin Trudeau and Donald Trump in pushing infrastructure plans designed primarily to turn the promise of public services into long-term corporate profit centres: But as I described recently in the Canadian context, these “partnerships” have proven enormously costly: “P3s are simply ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Jared Bernstein argues that the limited stimulus provided by tax cuts for the rich is far from worth the overall costs of exacerbating inequality and damaging public revenues: I’m encountering progressives who are compelled to be at least somewhat supportive of wasteful, regressive tax cuts, like those proposed ...

Michal Rozworski: #RealChange wearing thin: A look back at Trudeau’s first year

We’re one year into Justin Trudeau’s government of #RealChange, yet it’s mostly the rhetoric not the policies that have changed. Some of the shine is finally wearing off. Whether approving pipelines, settting electoral reform up to fail or privatizing airports and transit, the Liberals are showing themselves to be the good capitalist managers they’ve always been, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Linda McQuaig writes about the dangerous spread of privatized health care which threatens to undermine our universal system: Privatization advocates want us to believe public health care is no longer affordable. But in fact, it’s private, for-profit medicine that’s unaffordable. The publicly funded portion of our health ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Danielle Martin highlights how investments in ending poverty including a basic income can improve health outcomes among other key social indicators: Far more than consumption of medical care, income is the strongest predictor of health. Canadians are more likely to die at an earlier age and suffer more ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Murray Dobbin highlights how our political and economic discussions are poorer for the dominance of neoliberalism: That’s it? That’s the best the economics profession can come up with to explain Canadians’ indebtedness catastrophe? It’s all about human behaviour, written in stone, so I guess we might as well ...