Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Dani Rodrik argues that it’s too late to try to compensate the people being deliberately left behind by trade deals – and that instead, we need to make sure their interests are actually taken into account in how trade is structured: Today’s consensus concerning the need to compensate ...

Things Are Good: Be Safe Online

The American government recently repealed laws set to protect your privacy online, clearly the government doesn’t care about private communication. This impacts people around the world because a lot of internet traffic travels through the states via various online services. Safe and secure conversations are needed to keep a democracy running and we all deserve ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Nick Falvo, Janice Chan and Chidom Otogwu point out that housing is just one of the areas where federal action is needed to reduce poverty and its social harms in Canada. And Falvo also reviews Greg Suttor’s “Still Renovating” as a worthwhile look at housing in Canada. – ...

The Canadian Progressive: Cybersecurity should protect us – not control us

The cybersecurity debate can undermine human rights and the international obligation on governments to protect them, argues Lucy Purdon, a policy officer at Privacy International. The post Cybersecurity should protect us – not control us appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Things Are Good: Use Technology to Mobilize Your Community

The current federal leadership in the USA has many people concerned about their rights and freedoms. If you’re one of those people you can use these technological tools to help you stand up and fight back. Newsweek, rather surprisingly, compiled a list of tech tools that can be used to mobilize communities or be used ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Carol Linnitt notes that British Columbia’s provincial pipeline spill map has been conspicuously disappeared by the Clark Libs in the lead up to an election where environmental protection is a major issue. And Kathy Tomlinson is the latest to highlight both the glaring lack of reasonable fund-raising ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Carol Linnitt notes that British Columbia’s provincial pipeline spill map has been conspicuously disappeared by the Clark Libs in the lead up to an election where environmental protection is a major issue. And Kathy Tomlinson is the latest to highlight both the glaring lack of reasonable fund-raising ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how a change in government hasn’t done anything to slow the spread of Canada’s surveillance state – both in terms of intrusive new legislative proposals, and a continued determination to operate even outside the law. For further reading…– Again, Dave Seglins and Rachel Houlihan reported on the Cold War-era wiretapping approvals which are ...

Things Are Good: Easily Browse Online Anonymously

In a world where our digital lives are tracked by democratic governments (Canada and the UK amongst them) we need to ensure that we can have private conversations online. Over at Digg they have collected a very easy to follow setup to get your protecting your privacy online in only an hour! Keep Your Private ...

The Canadian Progressive: Montreal police spying on journalist Patrick Lagacé condemned by Reporters Without Borders

Reporters Without Borders is appalled by recent revelations that Montreal police secretly monitored the mobile phone of La Presse columist Patrick Lagacé. A coalition of Canadian rights groups links the Lagacé case to Canadian police and security services’ growing hunger for new powers and investigative capabilities. The post Montreal police spying on journalist Patrick Lagacé ...

The Canadian Progressive: Halloween costume ideas for Canadian digital rights activists

You’re a digital rights activists and are struggling to pick the right Halloween costume? Dave Maass, an investigative researcher with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, suggests facial recognition paint, stingrays, privacy badger, patent troll, and certbot. A Guy Fawkes mask would do too. The post Halloween costume ideas for Canadian digital rights activists appeared first on ...

The Canadian Progressive: For-Profit AT&T Spying Program is Worse Than Snowden Revelations

Telecommunications giant AT&T’s spying on Americans for profit on behalf of law enforcement agencies is “more terrifying than the illegal NSA surveillance programs that Edward Snowden exposed,” says rights group Fight for the Future. The post For-Profit AT&T Spying Program is Worse Than Snowden Revelations appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: Google Has Quietly Dropped Ban on Personally Identifiable Web Tracking

Google is the latest tech company to drop the longstanding wall between anonymous online ad tracking and user’s names. The post Google Has Quietly Dropped Ban on Personally Identifiable Web Tracking appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – George Monbiot discusses the importance of recognizing our social connections in making our political choices, rather than treating the world as merely a collection of unconnected individuals: It is not hard to see what the evolutionary reasons for social pain might be. Survival among social mammals is greatly ...

The Canadian Progressive: WTF? Yahoo spied on email customers for U.S. government

Yahoo secretly scanned all of its customer’s incoming emails in response to directives from the NSA and FBI. “This is a clear sign that people can trust neither their government nor their service providers to respect their privacy.” The post WTF? Yahoo spied on email customers for U.S. government appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Lawrence Summers discusses the economic damage being done by a top-heavy income spectrum – as the effect of major stimulus programs may have been wholly outweighed by the decline in middle-class incomes. – Meanwhile, Canadians for Tax Fairness points out the impending tax court case which will bring ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Valerie Strauss discusses the disastrous effects of corporatized education in the U.S. And Alex Hemingway examines how B.C.’s government (like Saskatchewan’s) is going out of its way to make it impossible for a public education system to do its job of offering a bright future to all ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Mariana Mazzucato makes the case for a progressive message of shared wealth creation: A progressive economic agenda must have at its heart an understanding of wealth creation as a collective process. Yes, businesses are wealth creators, but they do not create wealth alone. Workers, public institutions and civil ...

Mind Bending Politics: Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement Explained Perfectly

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is a trade agreement mostly negotiated in secret by quite a few governments bordering the pacific ocean.  Canada has been a part of these negotiations and is committed to ratifying the treaty.  Both US presidential candidates are now on the record against this treaty, while current US president Barack Obama has ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – In the wake of yesterday’s Brexit vote, David Dayen points out how the failure of technocratic policy left many voters believing they had nothing to lose in abandoning the European Union. Dawn Foster highlights the role Conservative-driven austerity played on that front. And Owen Jones comments on what ...

The Canadian Progressive: Canada’s Surveillance Crisis: Spy Agencies Must Come Clean

Three years after Edward Snowden’s eye-opening state surveillance revelations, it’s time for the Communications Security Establishment and Canada’s other spy agencies to come clean. The post Canada’s Surveillance Crisis: Spy Agencies Must Come Clean appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Cynthia Kaufman discusses Moses Naim’s theory that while a transnational ruling class has managed to exercise almost total control over the functions of government, it’s set to lose power over the public at large. And 63Mag interviews Jennifer Hollett about the future of progressive activism and organizing in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Christopher Jencks discusses why the U.S.’ poor are only getting poorer (in part due to the misapprehension that social programs aren’t available) in reviewing Kathryn Edin and Luke Shaefer’s $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America: In $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in ...

The Canadian Progressive: Michael Geist: Why Telecom Transparency Reporting in Canada Still Falls Short

Internet law expert Michael Geist explains how Rogers Communications’ recent transparency report “provides new insights into how much – or how little – Canadians know about when their personal information is disclosed to government agencies.” The post Michael Geist: Why Telecom Transparency Reporting in Canada Still Falls Short appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Caroline Plante reports on Quebec’s scourge of medical extra-billing and user fees (as identified by its own Auditor General). And Aaron Derfel notes that the federal government has done nothing to apply the Canada Health Act to rein in the practice. – Erika Shaker highlights how federal funding ...