Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Angella MacEwen and Cole Eisen challenge Galen Weston’s laughable claim that he and his multi-billion-dollar empire can’t afford to pay something closer to a living wage. And Jared Bernstein and Ben Spielberg connect the U.S.’ growing inequality to policy choices which have facilitated the accumulation of extreme wealth. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Crawford Kilian writes that Donald Trump’s presidency is merely a symptom of the wider disease of undue deference to wealth. And Matt Karp comments on the need for progressives to identify the problem rather than soft-peddling class divisions: What distinguished the Bernie Sanders campaign more than any other ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Nick Saul reminds us of the need for strong and consistent public pressure to end poverty. And the Economist points out how punitive criminal justice policies coupled with a lack of rehabilitation strand people in poverty rather than allowing for a path toward contributing to society. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Paul Campos compares the U.S.’ hourly wages to its GDP over the past few decades to show how workers have been left out of any economic growth. And Arindrajit Dube examines the effect of an increased minimum wage, and finds a direct impact on both income enhancement and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Michal Rozworski writes that the Trudeau Libs’ economic model has come into view, and that we should be fighting back against what it means for the public: I’ve long argued that the Liberals are at the leading edge of rebuilding a centrist, neoliberal consensus for a low-growth world. This is ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Vanessa Williamson writes that plenty of Americans want to see wealthy individuals and corporations pay their fair share of taxes – only to have that strong desire ignored by policymakers. And Joseph Stiglitz and Erika Siu discuss the glaring need for stronger tax enforcement around the globe. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Graham Lowe and Frank Graves examine the state of Canada’s labour market, and find a strong desire among workers for an activist government to ensure improved pay equality and social supports. Oxfam reaches similar conclusions in studying workers and employers in Scotland. And Emma Teitel reports on ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading: – Ross Douthat (!) discusses the distinction between actual cosmopolitanism, and the global elitism that’s instead come to dominate international power relations: Genuine cosmopolitanism is a rare thing. It requires comfort with real difference, with forms of life that are truly exotic relative to one’s own. It takes ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Tom Parkin writes about the tendency of far too many Canadian governments to put the wealthy at the front of the line, and leave the rest of us to wait: (O)ver the past two decades, corporate tax rates have been slashed in half. Canadians were told low corporate ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Katie Hyslop contrasts Canada’s longstanding recognition that housing is a human right against the gross lack of policy action to ensure its availability: Canada has signed and ratified the 1976 United Nations’ International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights (ICESCR), and in Article 11 it does recognize ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Rachel Bryce, Cristina Blanco Iglesias, Ashley Pullman and Anastasia Rogova examine the effect of inequality on education in Canada. And John McMurtry comments on the increasing hoarding of wealth and the lack of anything left over for the rest of us. – Emily Badger highlights the “million dollar ...

Accidental Deliberations: You say "glib", I say "callous and dehumanizing". Let’s just call the whole thing off.

Sadly, even a modicum of criticism of Brad Wall on Saskatchewan’s editorial pages is all too rare. But while the Star-Phoenix offers at least that much, is there any doubt that Wall’s contempt for inmates (among others who rely on provincial services) goes far beyond problems with his tone? Update: Murray Mandryk gets closer to ...

Accidental Deliberations: On priorities

I’ve written before about the Saskatchewan Party’s assumption that actually meeting the basic needs of inmates wasn’t a core function of the provincial correctional system. Well, the choice to turn food service into a corporate profit centre has produced predictable results. And faced with an inmate protest about unsafe and unhealthy food, Brad Wall had ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to start your new year. – Paul Krugman points out that as tends to be the case, the U.S.’ modest increase in high-end tax rates in 2013 managed to produce both more fair taxation and strong economic growth. – But Michael Hudson notes that increasing inequality and wage suppression are still among the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Hadrian Mertins-Kirkwood highlights how the Trans-Pacific Partnership will do little but strengthen the hand of the corporate sector against citizens. Duncan Cameron notes that even in the face of a full-court press for ever more stringent corporate controls, there’s plenty of well-justified skepticism about the TPP. And ...

The Canadian Progressive: Harper’s tough-on-crime agenda causing more prison violence, rights abuses

Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives researcher, Paula Mallea, explains how Harper’s tough-on-crime agenda has become a tough-on-rights crusade. The post Harper’s tough-on-crime agenda causing more prison violence, rights abuses appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – PressProgress makes the case that we can’t afford to risk another term of government neglect by the Harper Cons. Jeremy Nuttall discusses how the Cons’ fixed election date and anti-social economic policies each figure to cause direct damage to Canada’s economy in the course of a downturn. And ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Canadians for Tax Fairness crunches the numbers and finds that Canada is losing out on nearly $200 billion in assets being sheltered in tax havens. And David Kotz writes about the need for large-scale restructuring to address the glaring flaws in neoliberal dogma: Despite the resurgence of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Michal Rozworski reminds us that while a shift toward precarious work may represent an unwanted change from the few decades where labour prospered along with business, it’s all too familiar from a historical perspective: (P)recarity is what it means to have nothing to sell but your labour ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Edward Keenan is the latest to point out that any reasonable political decision-making process needs to include an adult conversation about taxes and why we need them: This week, when asked about the prospect of raising taxes beyond the rate of inflation in coming years, John Tory called ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Eugene Lang discusses the importance of fiscal choice in the lead up to the 2015 federal election. And Don Cayo reminds us that the Cons’ determination to hand free money to the wealthy – most recently through income-splitting and increased TFSA limits – means that everybody else has ...

The Cracked Crystal Ball II: An Act Of Aggression Is Still Wrong

I’m angry beyond words at this:  Transgender Woman’s Jail Treatment Prompts Complaints Baxter said Griffith was concerned about her safety and asked to be put into protective custody.  Guards moved her to the protective custody section and placed her in a cell with two accused male sex offenders, Baxter said. We’ve heard this kind of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading. – Robert Reich comments on the concerted effort by the U.S.’ rich to exacerbate inequality – and points out how it’s warped their worldview. And Dean Baker criticizes the spread of inequality by design: And then there is the financial sector where Mankiw tells us that the extraordinary pay ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, questioning the Saskatchewan Party’s belief that meeting the province’s constitutional duty to provide correctional centre inmates with the basic necessities of life isn’t a “core” government function. For further reading:– CTV reports on the label the Sask Party has applied to correctional food services (and the resulting privatization process) here.  – And once again, ...

Christy's Houseful of Chaos politics » Christy's Houseful of Chaos: Thoughts about the kid’s book The Stamp Collector

I borrowed the book The Stamp Collector from the library because I thought it might be another cute book about collections, and in a way it is but its also much darker and more relevant than that. The story starts like a folk tale with the city boy who loves stamps and a country boy who loves ...