Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Matt Bruenig explores the U.S.’ wealth inequality and finds a similarly skewed distribution of wealth among all kinds of demographic subgroups. And Robert Reich discusses why the attempt to sell a tax cut for billionaires as doing anything but making that problem worse is nothing short of laughable. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Asad Abbasi reviews a new book following up on Thomas Piketty’s work on the causes of inequality. – Peter Goodman and Jonathan Soble point out that the combination of tight job markets and stagnant wages has become a consistent reality in the developed world – and that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Joseph Stiglitz discusses how the Republican’s trillion-dollar corporate giveaway will only exacerbate inequality without doing anything to help the U.S.’ economy: If inequality was a problem before, enacting the Republicans’ proposed tax reform will make it much worse. Corporations and businesses will be among the big beneficiaries, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Trish Garner offers some suggestions for evidence-based poverty reduction – with a strong emphasis on the need for employers to pay a living wage. And Jim Stanford challenges critics of a $15 minimum wage to put their money where their mouth is when it comes to fearmongering ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – The Equality Trust examines the UK’s increasing level of personal precarity – and how public policy needs to be changed to support the people who need it, not those who already have the most. And Eduardo Porter offers a reminder that tax cuts for the rich do nothing ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Kevin McKean discusses how inequality undermines the goal of ensuring a healthy population. Matt Bruenig examines new data showing that the concentration of wealth in the U.S. is getting more extreme by the year. Steven Pearlstein writes about new polling showing that the U.S. public strongly favours ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Phillip Inman and Jill Treanor write about the debt time bomb facing UK households. Jim Edwards discusses how widespread underemployment has become the norm in the UK – making unemployment alone a misleading indicator as to workers’ well-being. And Owen Jones highlights how those developments are the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – Ritika Goel writes that good jobs lead to all kinds of ancillary benefits to both the health of workers, and the strength of the overall economy: We are in a time of increasing part-time, casual, temporary and contract work, with less access to benefits, insurance and pensions. Women, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Andrew Jackson, Tavia Grant et al, Kate McInturff and Trish Hennessy each look at Statistics Canada’s new income data which shows worsening inequality and persistent poverty over the past decade. – Jordan Brennan offers a needed response to a Financial Accountability Office of Ontario report which is ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Naomi Klein examines how climate change has contributed to a summer of extreme weather disasters, while David Suzuki highlights how we can work with nature to respond to increased flooding. And Emily Atkin discusses the outsized damage 90 corporate behemoths have done to our climate. – Meanwhile, Abacus ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Alex Himelfarb writes about the need to expand our idea of what’s possible through collective action: Is Trump the product of over forty years of attacks on the very idea of government, of decades in which government seemed to back away from our lives, when the best it ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2017 Platform Analysis – Jagmeet Singh

Having once expressed my concern that Jagmeet Singh would use his front-runner status as a means to avoid releasing much policy, I’ll again note that he’s instead offered up a detailed and thoughtful policy agenda. And while much of what he’s presented is relatively similar to the contents of Ashton’s platform (and in some cases ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Owen Jones points out Portugal’s example as a demonstration that that there is indeed an alternative to austerity – and that it’s better for public finances as well as for social progress: During the years of cuts, charities warned of a “social emergency”. Now the Portuguese government can ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Melanie Schmitz writes that Donald Trump’s plan to hand giant tax goodies to the rich is opposed by nearly three quarters of Americans. – CNBC reports on the skepticism among U.S. workers as to their future opportunities. And Jim Stanford offers a historical perspective on what’s most recently ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Owen Jones calls out the dogmatic centre for first laying the groundwork for the rise of the populist right, then trying to vilify anybody working on a progressive alternative. And Chris Dillow zeroes in on what’s wrong with the neoliberal view of the world: – Insufficient scepticism ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – David Leonhardt looks at the glaring growth of inequality in the U.S., while Matt Bruening charts how that trend is based entirely on capital ownership. And in the face of the Republicans’ plan for another round of giveaways to the rich, the New York Times’ editorial board ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – George Monbiot examines the history of James McGill Buchanan, Charles Koch and others who have used massive amounts of time and money to ensure that wealth wins out over democracy in shaping U.S. policy – and how their influence will sounds familiar elsewhere as well: The papers Nancy ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Larry Elliott reports on a Resolution Foundation study showing that while the UK’s 1% has fully recovered from the 2008 financial crash, the rest of the population hasn’t been so lucky and has faced extended stagnation at best: Families on low and middle incomes had seen their ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Josh Bivens notes that international trade deals have been structured to maximize the cost of globalization for the workers excluded from the bargaining table. And Jon Queally points out that a massive majority of Americans see power disproportionately hoarded by the rich at the expense of everybody else. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – The Global Alliance for Tax Justice examines the most common tax evasion practices used to allow the wealthy to avoid paying their fair share. And Desmond Cohen points out how our current estimates of inequality underestimate exactly how much is being hidden. –  David Macdonald anticipates and criticizes ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Michael Rozworski discusses the importance of workers exercising power over how our economy functions. Robert Booth reports on a forthcoming UK study showing the desperate need for improved quality of work and life among low-income individuals. And Lana Payne writes that a strong labour movement is essential to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Evening Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Katie Allen reports on Kathleen O’Grady’s look at precarious work – and how a generation of young workers is being taught to expect nothing more. Gareth Hutchens discusses Sally McManus’ call for the labour movement to seek opportunities to disrupt an economic system set up to exploit ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Lana Payne writes that austerity bears much of the blame for the Grenfell Tower inferno – as well as for the increased dangers facing all but the wealthiest of people: Grenfell Tower was not an accident. It is what happens when austerity becomes entrenched government ideology. Grenfell ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Alex Collinson discusses how insecure work makes it impossible to reliably structure an individual’s life: Many respondents told us about how difficult it is to budget without knowing how much you’ll be earning from one week to the next. The number of hours we are given every ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ellie Mae O’Hagan writes about Jeremy Corbyn’s much-needed work in addressing the loss of hope by young people in the UK: For the first time in a good few years, I’ve stopped worrying about money. I can imagine living somewhere nice without having to move to another country. ...