Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Owen Jones writes that excessive reliance on corporate profiteers is the reason why the UK’s trains don’t run on time. And Nora Loreto argues that postal banking is needed (among other reasons) to rein in abuses by Canada’s biggest banks. – Shannon Daub examines what British Columbia’s voters ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Rutger Bregman writes that the most extreme wealth in our economy is based on rents rather than productivity: In reality, it is the waste collectors, the nurses, and the cleaners whose shoulders are supporting the apex of the pyramid. They are the true mechanism of social solidarity. Meanwhile, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Erica Johnson reports that the problem of bank employees being pushed to fleece customers (legality be damned) is common to all of Canada’s major banks. And Lisa Wright reports that the result will be a national investigation. But it’s appalling that it took anonymous reports to the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Bessma Momani writes that Donald Trump’s plan to leave the U.S. at the mercy of unregulated financial markets figures to cause another crisis comparable to – or worse than – that of 2008: Nearly 10 years ago, the U.S. financial industry was exposed as a glorified Ponzi ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Roy Romanow writes about the dangers of focusing unduly on raw economic growth, rather than measuring our choices by how they actually affect people’s well-being: At the national level, the picture that emerges over the past 21 years is a GDP rebounding post-recession but Canadians literally continuing to ...

We Pivot: You Probably Already Support Postal Banking Too

CUPW, the union for Canada Post workers, has had some innovative ideas lately which the Harper and Trudeau governments are, not surprisingly, not too keen on. Both governments pursue a neoliberal privatization agenda. Public services like CBC and Canada Post provide no profit layer to companies because they exist as public services. Privatizing them lets ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Armine Yalnizyan writes that the response to the European Commission’s finding that Apple has dodged $20 billion in taxes may tell us all we need to know about the relative power of governments and corporations: The EC is also investigating state support received by Amazon and McDonalds in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Armine Yalnizyan writes that the response to the European Commission’s finding that Apple has dodged $20 billion in taxes may tell us all we need to know about the relative power of governments and corporations: The EC is also investigating state support received by Amazon and McDonalds in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Paolo Giuliano and Antonio Spilimbergo study (PDF) how the economic conditions an individual’s youth influence enduring values – and find that the experience of an economic shock tends to lead to a greater appreciation of a fair redistribution of resources: Consistent with theories of social psychology, this ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Owen Jones interviews Ha-Joon Chang about the foreseeable harm caused by the UK’s austerity, as well as the false claims used to push it. – The Stoney Creek News rightly argues that Canada Post should move toward posting banking in large part due to the potential to improve ...

Alberta Politics: It’s time for a national postal bank in both Canada and the United States

PHOTOS: The little Post Office in downtown St. Albert, where your blogger lives, which Canada Post is anxious to close as soon as possible. Below: The U.S. Post Office in Fallon, Montana, the Canadian Post Office in Dewberry, Alberta (villageofdewberry.ca), American social activist Ralph Nader, and Service Alberta Minister Stephanie McLean. We now live in ...

Political Eh-conomy: Political Eh-conomy Radio: Postal banking

Introducing the Political Eh-conomy Radio podcast, a new podcast on economic issues in Canada and beyond. The inaugural episode tackles postal banking: why cut valuable services and jobs at Canada Post when it is instead possible to create financial services run by the post office, at the same ensuring the Post’s future sustainability? Canada Post ...

Political Eh-conomy: Strategy, or escape from the privatization matrix (Canada Post, Part 2)

The endgame of the current rounds of cuts at Canada Post is some form of privatization. In the previous post, I argued that privatization proceeds differently depending on context. Many factors – I focused on whether a public service provider is exposed to competition and is profitable – can have an impact. The result of ...

Politics and its Discontents: Tory Policy-Making: The Dangers Of Simplistic Thinking

Fallacies of reasoning are easy traps to fall into. Whether it is absolutist thinking, straw man arguments or any number of other errors of thought, we are all prone to them, and I am sure that I am no exception. Our best defense against such faulty thinking is to try to cultivate our critical faculties ...

The Canadian Progressive: New study makes the case for postal banking in Canada

The reintroduction of postal banking in Canada would offer access to financial services not now available to many Canadians, says new study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. The post New study makes the case for postal banking in Canada appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.