Scripturient: Ars Poetica

Horace’s Ars Poetica, or the Art of Poetry, was written as a 476-line poem in a letter to his friend, the Roman senator  Lucius Calpurnius Piso (Lucius) and his two sons, around 19 BCE. It was known for a time as the “Epistle to the Pisos” until 95CE when the

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Scripturient: Kerouac’s Haikus

Haiku is like a razor blade: small, light, but yet strong and incredibly sharp. Haiku says “Look over there!” and then smacks you from the other side. Haiku is the neutron star of poetry: stunning density combined with astounding brightness. Haiku swims in a sea of metaphor, darting like quick, bright

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Alberta Politics: In Flanders Fields? It’s time to encourage another generation of school kids to read some better poems from the Great War

A civilization that forgets its poetry is barely worthy of the name. Like fiction and unlike non-fiction, poetry is how a culture’s most profound truths are told. Unlike fiction, poetry does this vital work with great economy of words. Dr. John McCrae, surgeon in the Canadian Expeditionary Force during the

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Scripturient: Musings on Poets and Poetry

For me, reading the American literary critic, Harold Bloom, is often like wading in molasses. Intellectual molasses, to be sure, but slow going nonetheless. His writing is thick with difficult ideas and difficult words. Bloom’s historical reach, his knowledge and his understanding of the tapestry of literature far outstrip mine,

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PostArctica: A Charter Poem

A Charter Poem A charter poem slipped onto the shore where I sat daydreaming about you it came from a flooded place back up the river and seemed happy to  be on solid ground again landfilled ground containing the detritus that caused the flood upstream

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