Dead Wild Roses: Know Thyself? From Socrates to Freud.

A couple of minutes of interesting psychology/philosophy to start your day. 🙂

Dead Wild Roses: On Echo Chambers and Epistemic Bubbles

Defending against the Echo Chamber effect is difficult as we naturally seek familiar points of view that reinforce our own.  Discourse has always been the key factor in helping people check their views against others and find the experts that they can put their confidence in.  Engaging with others, especially with differing points of view, ...

Dead Wild Roses: A Selfish Argument for Making the World a Better Place – In a Nutshell

There are a few questionable assumptions that go along with premise of this video, but I do like the overall idea presented.

Things Are Good: This Flowchart Helps You Evaluate any Argument

Figure 1 from Cook, Ellerton, and Kinkead 2018. CC BY 3.0 Complex issues with multiple influential factors can be difficult to process for some. Three researchers from George Mason University and the University of Queensland decided to help people evaluate arguments by combining their own knowledge into one handy flowchart. The flowchart (above) is a ...

Scripturient: Found in translation

Language translation fascinates me. It’s a mix of language skill, art, interpretation, science and, apparently, divination. Maybe even magic. Going from one language into another is far from a simple step of swapping words in dictionary manner – Flaubert’s le mot juste. Any fool can do that. Hell, even Google can. A single word can ...

Dead Wild Roses: The DWR Sunday Religious Disservice – You Choose the Meaning of Life

So many choices. For me, it really depends on the day but gravitate toward a nice blend of Kant and Aristotle.

Writings of J. Todd Ring: What Do I Want? (Or, What is to be done, if we are to have any future worth living?)

What do I want? Well, I would like to see us move immediately to a libertarian socialist society, along the lines that Chomsky, Bertrand Russell, Rudolph Rocker, or Murray Bookchin have described. Or better: an anarchist communist society, such as Kropotkin described. But I don’t see that as something that is likely to happen in ...

Things Are Good: Hundreds of Short Videos to Learn About Philosophy

Too many people think that philosophy is a practice for elites or people with too much time on their hands. Contrary to popular belief studying philosophy is easy and readily available. Studying philosophy helps with many aspects of life from logical thinking to mindful peace. Yes you can learn all about philosophy from some great ...

Dead Wild Roses: Why I Won’t Use A Cellphone – Philip Reed

On the level folks, I do use a cellphone – a smart phone even.  But I’m not sure I like it.  I most certainly enjoy the GPS that comes with it, as finding those schools tucked away in suburban hell can be very tricky, even at the best of times.  But, past the land navigation ...

Writings of J. Todd Ring: Bitcoin, Crypto-Currencies and Global Trends — Tipping Points Approaching Fast

Question: Cryptos — Which ones, and when? Answer: Two, and right now Waiting for the (painfully slow) transfer of funds from one Bitcoin wallet to another — both my own, in order to be able to buy Stellar Lumens with Bitcoins (since you can’t buy Lumens directly with fiat paper currencies, it being too new) I have the painfully ...

Scripturient: Shin Godzilla: the reboot

I’m almost embarrassed to admit that, of all the Godzilla films I’ve watched, I can recall the exact details of few. I cannot remember, just by looking at the title, which monsters were battling which. I need to look at the slipcase cover to see a picture to remind me which foe Godzilla was battling ...

Scripturient: War for the Planet of the Apes considered

Pierre Boulle never imagined War for the Planet of the Apes, the latest film in the remade franchise. In fact, it would be fair to say the author of the original book never imagined any of the series, from the first in 1968 to the latest, released in 2017. They were far, far from what ...

Dead Wild Roses: Is Reality Real- The Simulation Argument

It might explain what is happening in the US, if our alien observers accidentally split the stupid sauce on the hard drive… Filed under: Science Tagged: Philosophy, Reality, Science

Scripturient: Montaigne and The Block

I do love reading Michel de Montaigne.  And writing about him. In 2014 alone, I wrote ten separate posts about him and his famous book, Essays. But since then, my reading habits moved on to other writers and topics. I hadn’t actually been reading Montaigne in the past few years, but recently while sorting some ...

Scripturient: The Dude, the Tao and the Dharma

I suppose it all began with Benjamin Hoff. Hoff was one of the first contemporary writers to attempt to distill Taoism in a lighthearted form for Westerners when he wrote The Tao of Pooh in 1981, a very successful book still in print. It was on the New York Times bestseller list for 49 weeks. ...

Scripturient: Thrasymachus and The Block

There’s a character in Plato’s Republic called Thrasymachus who acts as a foil to Socrates by presenting a series of comments and arguments the old philosopher has to debate and counter. He (Thrasymachus) is based on an actual historical figure, a Sophist from the fifth century BCE. It’s unknown if the views Plato has him ...

Scripturient: Marcus Aurelius and The Block

Perhaps the most famous work by any Stoic is the Meditations, written as a series of notes-to-myself by Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius.  I’ve been reading a lot of Stoic works of late, and this remains my favourite. Although never meant for publication, just as reminders to himself, it’s full of wonderful, inspiring comments. And some ...

Scripturient: The hospital, the trolley and political ethics

In its decision about the redevelopment of the Collingwood General & Marine Hospital, Collingwood Council is evidently taking the track less travelled, trolleyology-wise. Seen as an ethical issue, our council has chosen to act against the greater good. Trolleyology is the somewhat humourous name given to philosophical intellectual exercises or thought problems about our ethics ...

Scripturient: The dystopian present

If there is one good thing to come out of the election of Donald Trump, it has been the renewed interest in a certain genre of literature. Sales of dystopian novels have skyrocketed on Amazon, in particular what might be called “The Big Three” of dystopian tales: George Orwell’s 1984, Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, ...

Scripturient: Empathy and The Dog Allusion

Empathy, writes Martin Rowson, is one of the things that make us human, make us civilized, allows us to interact without tearing one another’s throats out. Without it, we’d have no civilization; we’d be like the beasts of the fields. And we’d have no dogs or gods, either. Empathy is what makes us own pets ...

Dead Wild Roses: The DWR Quote of the Day – On Life

   I hate it when people say stuff that rings true and hits close to home.   “A word about my personal philosophy.  It is anchored in optimism.  It must be, for optimism brings with it hope, a future with purpose, and therefore, a will to fight for a better world.  Without this optimism, there ...

Scripturient: On growing old

No man is so old that he does not think himself able to live another year. (Nemo enim est tam senex qui se annum non putet posse vivere) I was thinking of that line from Cicero this week when I attended a friend’s drop-in post-Christmas party. Most of the many people in attendance were my ...

Scripturient: Eheu fugaces, Postume…

Alas, Postumus, the swift years slip away. Those words are one translation of the opening line of the 14th Ode in the second book of Horace’s carminas, or songs: Eheu fugaces, Postume, Postume/labuntur anni… * For me, it’s his most moving piece, a bittersweet acceptance of mortality; the inevitability of age and death. Something no ...

Scripturient: The subtle art of Mark Manson

I have a healthy skepticism towards anything labelled a “self-help” book – especially those that aim at making your life happier or more fulfilled through some fad, superstition or pseudoscience. I am, as you know from this blog, cynical towards the unending volume of New Age woo hoo, fads and pseudoscience that pollutes bookstore shelves ...

Dead Wild Roses: Larry Strangelove or How Lurking in a Haunted House Helped Alleviate My Existential Angst and Fear of Death

“I do not fear death. I had been dead for billions and billions of years before I was born, and had not suffered the slightest inconvenience from it.” -Mark Twain, maybe I like this quote and I envy its author. It is rational, clear headed, and it makes all kinds of sense. Earlier this year ...