Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the Trudeau Libs’ willingness to favour the concentration of money, power and privilege. For further reading…– Peter Zimonjic reported on the fallout from Bill Morneau’s profit off of his own decisions as Finance Minister, while Kathleen Harris discussed his belated attempt to distance himself from his own choices. And in the example of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Michal Rozworski writes that the bidding war surrounding Amazon’s second headquarters is just a symptom of a grossly dysfunctional relationship between governments and businesses: We shouldn’t be surprised that Amazon can get away with using a few billion dollars of private investment as bait for public billions in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Dennis Howlett highlights how the Libs are only making our tax system even less fair by overreacting to trumped-up criticism of a plan to close minor loopholes: As​ ​the​ ​dust​ ​settles​ ​on​ ​the​ Trudeau government’s private​ ​ corporation​ tax​ ​reforms,​ ​Canada​ ​seem​s ​to​ ​be​ falling ​ further​ ​behind​ ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the growing gap between the Trudeau Libs’ “middle class” messaging and the self-perception of a growing working class in Canada. For further reading…– Ekos’ polling is discussed here, with detailed tables here (PDF).– The Libs’ 2015 platform is again here (PDF). And again, PressProgress discussed Bill Morneau’s message that Canadian workers should accept ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – David Sirota talks to Naomi Klein about the push by right-wing politicians and corporate media outlets alike to stifle any discussion of how fossil fuels contribute to the climate change fuelling Hurricane Harvey. Matt Taibbi laments how the media contributed to the development of a public so ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Cole Eisen points out how Sears – like far too many other businesses – has deliberately depleted employees’ pension funds while extracting billions of dollars for executives and shareholders: Sears Canada’s woes stem from what appears to be a methodical process of value extraction. While Sears’s pension funding ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Income transfers, means testing, and universality, oh, my!

Overall, the NDP leadership race has provided a lot for progressive economists to be excited about. From progressive tax reform to fair wages and worker’s rights, poverty fighting income transfers to new universal social programs, the four leadership candidates have put substantive and laudable social democratic proposals on the table. Unfortunately, the last debate waded ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Michael Rozworski discusses the importance of workers exercising power over how our economy functions. Robert Booth reports on a forthcoming UK study showing the desperate need for improved quality of work and life among low-income individuals. And Lana Payne writes that a strong labour movement is essential to ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: The NDP and Old Age Security

NDP leadership candidate Jagmeet Singh has proposed (with few details) to reform the current Old Age Security system by integrating Old Age Security (OAS) and the Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS.) “A Jagmeet Singh-led government will implement the Canada Seniors Guarantee to ensure that no Canadian senior has to live in poverty. The Canada Seniors Guarantee ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Danny Dorling sets out how a more equal society leads to benefits for everybody. And Annie Lowrey discusses Richard Reeves’ take on the separation between the top 20% of the income spectrum and the rest of the U.S. – particularly in preventing social mobility. – Meagan Gilmore points ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Sarah O’Connor examines the inconsistent relationship between job quantity and quality as another example of how it’s misleading to think of policy choices solely in terms of the number of jobs generated. Angela Monaghan discusses how wages continue to stagnate in the UK despite a low unemployment ...

Michal Rozworski: Neoliberalism restructures work and pensions

On today’s show, two sociologists talk about aspects of neoliberal restructuring. First, Nicole Aschoff, sociologist, author of The New Prophets of Capital and until very recently managing editor of Jacobin magazine speaks with me about the auto industry, Trump and why globalization shouldn’t be solely blamed for the destruction of good jobs even while it ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Ethan Cox reports on new polling showing that Canadians are highly concerned about inequality – even if our governments aren’t doing anywhere meaningful to address it: Of Canadians surveyed, 73 per cent said their and their family’s economic situation had stayed the same or gotten worse over the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Olivia Loveridge-Greene comments on new research showing how many workers may be forced to keep working into their 70s or beyond in order to be able to stay afloat. And Don Pittis explains why tax-free savings accounts and other giveaways to the wealthy won’t do anything to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Olivia Loveridge-Greene comments on new research showing how many workers may be forced to keep working into their 70s or beyond in order to be able to stay afloat. And Don Pittis explains why tax-free savings accounts and other giveaways to the wealthy won’t do anything to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Jesse Ferreras reports that Canada’s supposed job growth has included almost nothing but part-time and precarious work. And Louis-Philippe Rochon points out how the influence of the financial sector has led to economic choices which serve nobody else’s interests: What makes governments hesitate to pursue policies they ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Jared Bernstein highlights how a generation of public policy has systematically transferred risk from the wealthy who claim to bear it, to the general public which can’t afford to do so: Back in the late 2000s, two authors — the economics journalist Peter Gosselin and the political scientist ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Ten things to know about the CPP debate

This fall, Canada’s Parliament will debate a proposal to expand the Canada Pension Plan (CPP).  And over at the Behind the Numbers web site, I’m co-author of a blog post titled “Ten things to know about the CPP debate.” The blog post’s other co-authors are Allan Moscovitch and Richard Lochead. Points raised in the blog ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Thomas Walkom writes that the federal Libs’ idea of “real change” for the economy reflects nothing more than the same old stale neoliberal playbook: At its core, the federal government’s “bold” new plan for economic growth is strikingly familiar. The scheme, worked out by Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s ...

Left Over: Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics (with apologies and an acknowledgement to Mark Twain..)

      ttps://www.facebook.com/BCLiberalCaucus/?hc_ref=NEWSFEED&fref=nf     http://thetyee.ca/Opinion/2016/08/23/Critical-Services-Suffering-in-BC/?utm_source=weekly&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=290816   In their latest propaganda piece  the  BC Libs are  attempting, lamely, to counter  research that shows that BC has one of the lowest education budgets per student in the country..not much of a surprise  for most of us who watch with dismay as they continue to dismantle ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Federal Income Support for Low-Income Seniors

Over at the Behind the Numbers web site, Allan Moscovitch, David Macdonald and I have a blog post titled “Ten Things to Know About Federal Income Support for Low-Income Seniors in Canada.” The blog post argues—among other things—that if the age of eligibility for Old Age Security were to move from 65 to 67, the ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: How not to fund infrastructure

Recycling is supposed to be a good thing, so when the federal Liberals quietly announced that “asset recycling” would be part of their strategy for meeting their much-ballyhooed infrastructure promises, not many eyebrows were raised. They should have been. Asset recycling is an obscure code word for selling our public goods for private profit. It’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Joseph Stiglitz writes about the political consequences of economic policies which have siphoned wealth to the lucky few, and writes that it’s long past time to start challenging the corporate power which has made citizens into an afterthought: (L)arge portions of the population have not been doing well. ...

Alberta Politics: Cue the crickets: Where are the media warnings Canada Post bosses are ‘holding the country to ransom’?

PHOTOS: Locked out postal workers in a past dispute in Halifax (HalifaxMediaCoop.ca photo). Below: St. Albert resident’s illegal “Restore door to door” sign (CBC photo), Controversial Canada Post CEO Deepak Chopra, CUPW President Mike Palecek, and St. Albert Mayor Nolan Crouse. It’s funny, you know, but there doesn’t seem to have been a single mainstream ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Jeff Guo reports on Peter Lindert and Jeffrey Williamson’s research showing how the U.S. went from standing out internationally for its relatively equal distribution of wealth, to being equally exceptional in its inequality: In the Revolutionary era, inequality in America was dramatically lower than it was in ...