Michal Rozworski: Neoliberalism restructures work and pensions

On today’s show, two sociologists talk about aspects of neoliberal restructuring. First, Nicole Aschoff, sociologist, author of The New Prophets of Capital and until very recently managing editor of Jacobin magazine speaks with me about the auto industry, Trump and why globalization shouldn’t be solely blamed for the destruction of good jobs even while it ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Ethan Cox reports on new polling showing that Canadians are highly concerned about inequality – even if our governments aren’t doing anywhere meaningful to address it: Of Canadians surveyed, 73 per cent said their and their family’s economic situation had stayed the same or gotten worse over the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Olivia Loveridge-Greene comments on new research showing how many workers may be forced to keep working into their 70s or beyond in order to be able to stay afloat. And Don Pittis explains why tax-free savings accounts and other giveaways to the wealthy won’t do anything to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Olivia Loveridge-Greene comments on new research showing how many workers may be forced to keep working into their 70s or beyond in order to be able to stay afloat. And Don Pittis explains why tax-free savings accounts and other giveaways to the wealthy won’t do anything to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Jesse Ferreras reports that Canada’s supposed job growth has included almost nothing but part-time and precarious work. And Louis-Philippe Rochon points out how the influence of the financial sector has led to economic choices which serve nobody else’s interests: What makes governments hesitate to pursue policies they ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Jared Bernstein highlights how a generation of public policy has systematically transferred risk from the wealthy who claim to bear it, to the general public which can’t afford to do so: Back in the late 2000s, two authors — the economics journalist Peter Gosselin and the political scientist ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Ten things to know about the CPP debate

This fall, Canada’s Parliament will debate a proposal to expand the Canada Pension Plan (CPP).  And over at the Behind the Numbers web site, I’m co-author of a blog post titled “Ten things to know about the CPP debate.” The blog post’s other co-authors are Allan Moscovitch and Richard Lochead. Points raised in the blog ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Thomas Walkom writes that the federal Libs’ idea of “real change” for the economy reflects nothing more than the same old stale neoliberal playbook: At its core, the federal government’s “bold” new plan for economic growth is strikingly familiar. The scheme, worked out by Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s ...

Left Over: Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics (with apologies and an acknowledgement to Mark Twain..)

      ttps://www.facebook.com/BCLiberalCaucus/?hc_ref=NEWSFEED&fref=nf     http://thetyee.ca/Opinion/2016/08/23/Critical-Services-Suffering-in-BC/?utm_source=weekly&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=290816   In their latest propaganda piece  the  BC Libs are  attempting, lamely, to counter  research that shows that BC has one of the lowest education budgets per student in the country..not much of a surprise  for most of us who watch with dismay as they continue to dismantle ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Federal Income Support for Low-Income Seniors

Over at the Behind the Numbers web site, Allan Moscovitch, David Macdonald and I have a blog post titled “Ten Things to Know About Federal Income Support for Low-Income Seniors in Canada.” The blog post argues—among other things—that if the age of eligibility for Old Age Security were to move from 65 to 67, the ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: How not to fund infrastructure

Recycling is supposed to be a good thing, so when the federal Liberals quietly announced that “asset recycling” would be part of their strategy for meeting their much-ballyhooed infrastructure promises, not many eyebrows were raised. They should have been. Asset recycling is an obscure code word for selling our public goods for private profit. It’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Joseph Stiglitz writes about the political consequences of economic policies which have siphoned wealth to the lucky few, and writes that it’s long past time to start challenging the corporate power which has made citizens into an afterthought: (L)arge portions of the population have not been doing well. ...

Alberta Politics: Cue the crickets: Where are the media warnings Canada Post bosses are ‘holding the country to ransom’?

PHOTOS: Locked out postal workers in a past dispute in Halifax (HalifaxMediaCoop.ca photo). Below: St. Albert resident’s illegal “Restore door to door” sign (CBC photo), Controversial Canada Post CEO Deepak Chopra, CUPW President Mike Palecek, and St. Albert Mayor Nolan Crouse. It’s funny, you know, but there doesn’t seem to have been a single mainstream ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Jeff Guo reports on Peter Lindert and Jeffrey Williamson’s research showing how the U.S. went from standing out internationally for its relatively equal distribution of wealth, to being equally exceptional in its inequality: In the Revolutionary era, inequality in America was dramatically lower than it was in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jeremy Smith argues that the Brexit vote result should serve as a compelling reminder of the dangers of neoliberalism. John Hood focuses on inequality in particular as a driving force behind the willingness of voters to leave the European Union, while Mike Carter points out the connection between ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on this week’s Canada Pension Plan announcement – and the Wall government’s surprising decision to merely delay rather than outright obstruct a national boost to retirement security. For further reading…– Kevin Milligan, Sheila Block, Adam Mayers and the Canadian Press each offer useful looks at what the CPP expansion means. And Milligan has also ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Neil Irwin writes about the White House Council of Economic Advisers’ study of employment policy which found that superior protections for workers (rather than the undermining of employment standards in the name of “flexibility”) correlate to improved workforce participation. – MaxSpeak discusses the value of universal social ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Phillipe Orliange discusses the significance of inequality in the developing world as a problem for both fairness and economic development: The question of inequality has become so important because societal cohesion broadly depends upon it. It is not normal for 1% of the population to possess as much ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Eric Reguly highlights the growing possibility of a global revolt against corporate-centred trade agreements: (A) funny thing happened on the way to the free trade free-for-all: A lot of people were becoming less rich and more angry, to the point that globalization seems set to go into reverse. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Murray Dobbin is hopeful that we may be seeing corporate globalization based on unquestioned neoliberal ideology come to an end: There is no definitive way to identify when an ideology begins to lose its grip on the public discourse but could this clear resistance (it is even more ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Alison Crawford reports on the Libs’ failure to pass any new legislation to allow collective bargaining for RCMP members – leaving them with even less than the system which was already found to be unconstitutional. And Jake Johnson discusses the consequences of the U.S. corporate sector’s war ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – Lana Payne writes about the need for a Bernie Sanders in Canada to highlight and oppose the privilege of the wealthy few: It is in this context of blatant unfairness — rules for the rich and rules for the rest — that politicians like Bernie Sanders have become ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Carol Goar writes about the need for Canada’s federal government to rethink how we view taxes. And Simon Wren-Lewis tries to explain the resilience of austerian ideology even as it fails every test in the real world. – Paul Krugman discusses how Donald Trump’s greatest sin in the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Sarah Anderson, Marc Bayard, John Cavanagh, Chuck Collins, Josh Hoxie and Sam Pizzigati offer an outline as to how to fight back against growing inequality: § We need to see inequality as a deep systemic problem. Piecemeal interventions have not helped slow or reverse the pace of wealth ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and Nick Powdthavee discuss how the rise of an exclusive class of the rich increases stress and decreases well-being for everybody else. Using data from the World Top Incomes Database and the Gallup World Poll, we compared the share of taxable income held by ...