Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Lee Drutman points out that Donald Trump’s presidency represents an entirely foreseeable result of a two-party, first-past-the-post electoral system: (C)ontrary to claims that American political parties have to appeal broadly to win, they only need to win a quarter of the voting-age population to gain unified control of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Nathaniel Lewis laments the state of the U.S.’ woefully insufficient social supports, while emphasizing the importance of public social spending in particular: (P)rivate “social spending” is, for the most part, regressive and narrowly distributed. Households are bearing the cost directly for the goods and services that they themselves ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Spencer Piston argues that it’s unreasonable to blame people living in poverty for not participating in political structures designed to exclude them – while noting that many Americans want to see a far more progressive tax system which politicians have made no effort to pursue. – And ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Thomas Edsall discusses the difficulties in trying to address wealth inequality through a money-infused electoral system: Five years ago, for example, Adam Bonica, a political scientist at Stanford, published “Why Hasn’t Democracy Slowed Rising Inequality?” Economic theory, he wrote, holds that “inequality should be at least partially self-correcting ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – David McGrane writes about Jack Layton’s five great fights – and how they continue to provide an essential framework for social democrats. – Rupert Neate reports on London’s “ghost towers”, which include tens of thousands of high-end homes sitting empty in a city facing a severe housing crisis. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Gwynn Guilford discusses how dependence on coal and other resources has left the U.S.’ Appalachian region both poor and ill-equipped for the future after enriching a few corporate owners. And David Dayen notes that a national tax giveaway to the rich is leading to a new round of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Richard Partington writes that the poorest Britons stand to bear the brunt of the next wave of technological change through further diminished employment prospects. But Peter Goodman points out that a stronger social safety net in Sweden (among other countries) tends to ensure that workers share in the ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Donald Trump is just one of far too many politicians trying to undercut needed counterbalances in the media, political systems and civil society. For further reading…– Rem Reider’s story offers a few examples of Trump’s attacks on the press.– Althia Raj reported on Bill Morneau’s complaints about opposition MPs doing their job, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Wanda Wyporska writes that increasing inequality is the main factor behind public distrust and discontent with our politics: Rising inequality is not inevitable, it is largely a result of the political and economic decisions taken by governments. This is clear from the varying levels of inequality in ...

Alberta Politics: Municipal politics: If you choose to run with a slate, don’t complain when you’re asked about other members’ views

PHOTOS: St. Albert’s iconic city hall, site of the growing community’s only public library. Image grabbed from Councillor Wes Brodhead’s website. Below: Mayoral candidates Cathy Heron and Cam MacKay (photos grabbed from their campaign materials), and one side of the anti-branch-library leaflet published by a group of six candidates for city council. The group distributes ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2017 Links

The latest from the NDP’s federal leadership campaign following Jagmeet Singh’s impressive first-ballot victory. – Paul Wells discusses how Singh’s youth and optimism fit with the NDP’s history and self-image. Jeremy Nuttall interviews Brian Topp about some lessons Singh can take from Jack Layton – including his apparent plan to engage first and foremost in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Anushka Asthana, Jessica Elgot and Rowena Mason report on Jeremy Corbyn’s path as Labour leader – which include genuinely moving the UK’s political centre of gravity to the left while improving his party’s electoral prospects in the process. – Andrew Boozary and Danielle Martin write that the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Jeremy Corbyn offers a look at what the next UK Labour government plans to do – and provides an example which we should be glad to follow: The next Labour government will be different. To earn the trust of the people of our country, we must show ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Noah Smith makes the case for the U.S. Democrats to emphasize trust-busting as a means of restoring power to people rather than the business lobby: Big companies often argue that mergers will allow increased economies of scale, whose efficiencies will more than cancel out any price rise ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Susanna Rustin reports on a new study from the London School of Economics demonstrating the lifelong personal impacts of childhood poverty. And Colleen Kimmit writes that the solution to food insecurity (along with other elements of personal precarity) is a guaranteed income, not charity or redundant skills ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Richard Seymour follows up on Jeremy Corbyn’s electoral success by highlighting the importance of a grassroots progressive movement which stays active and vibrant between election cycles: Labour needs only a small swing to win a majority if there were to be another election, and current polling suggests they ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – John Harris discusses the appeal of Jeremy Corbyn’s tendency toward genuine conversation rather than soundbites. And Gary Younge notes that the pundit class’ dismissal of Corbyn has proven to say a lot more about their faulty assumptions than about the prospects of progressive politics: The economic crash ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Branko Milanovic reviews Mike Lofgren’s The Deep State, and highlights how entrenched wealth and power have hijacked our public institutions for their own benefit: The deep state includes the old-fashioned military-industrial complex, top of Wall Street and Silicon valley, think tanks and foundations, and the mainstream media, ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, following up on this post as to the Libs’ cynical repudiation of the very concept of ideas and values in politics. For further reading…– Fair Vote Canada’s list of National Advisory Board members is here – and as noted, it hardly reflects the spin of being “anti-Liberal”. And FVC’s statement as to the importance ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Nick Falvo, Janice Chan and Chidom Otogwu point out that housing is just one of the areas where federal action is needed to reduce poverty and its social harms in Canada. And Falvo also reviews Greg Suttor’s “Still Renovating” as a worthwhile look at housing in Canada. – ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: The Alternative Federal Budget 2017

This year’s Alternative Federal Budget (AFB) was released on March 9. I was proud to be the primary author of its housing chapter (that chapter is available in English here and in French here). The first AFB exercise began in 1994, with the first AFB being published in 1995. That involved a joint effort between ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that to start your 2017. – Ideas examines how the assumptions underlying far too much economic theory have produced disastrous real-world results. And Harold Meyerson writes that research is proving that skeptics of corporate-driven free trade have been right all along. – Gary Younge writes that the rise of populist right-wing politicians can ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the need for progressive leaders and activists alike to build connections beyond borders and party lines to combat a reactionary movement which spans the globe. For further reading…– Sam Kriss discusses how the systematic stifling of the left has given rise to the toxic politics of the right.– Demi Lee points out why ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Jonathan Chait sees Larry Kudlow’s claim that “Wealthy folks have no need to steal or engage in corruption!” as an all-too-accurate statement of the belief system underlying Donald Trump’s presidency: What has been exposed is not only the lie at the heart of Trump’s campaign, but a delusion ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jonathan Sas highlights why we’re best off having public services delivered by the public sector: The three decades long bashing and diminishing of the redistributive capacities of the state has led to pronounced inequality, degraded infrastructure stock, and a blunted ability of government to respond to current societal ...