Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – In advance of this year’s Progress Summit, Ed Broadbent writes that burgeoning inequality threatens our democracy: Inequality matters. Promises must be kept. It’s not enough for our government to celebrate the diversity of our country but not enact policies that head off growing inequality. Mr. Trudeau, it’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Charles Smith and Andrew Stevens examine how Brad Wall’s slash-and-burn budget is intended to exploit a crisis for political ends – while also highlighting the type of response needed to reverse the damage: In our view, Budget 2017 should be viewed in two ways. First, it is ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Michal Rozworski writes that the Trudeau Libs’ economic model has come into view, and that we should be fighting back against what it means for the public: I’ve long argued that the Liberals are at the leading edge of rebuilding a centrist, neoliberal consensus for a low-growth world. This is ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Neil Irwin examines one of the key ideas underlying the U.S. Democrats’ economic plans, being that workers need to have meaningful choices rather than being trapped by a limited and slanted set of available employers and work structures: Labor market monopsony is the idea that when there isn’t ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Robert Reich points out how perpetually more severe corporate rights agreements are destroying the U.S.’ middle class. And Michael Geist concludes his must-read series by summarizing the dangers of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (and making the case against ratifying it). – Jeremy Runnalls writes about the growing movement toward ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Sally Goemer writes that extreme inequality is a cause of economic instability for everybody. And Tom Powdrill discusses the importance of organized labour in ensuring the fair sharing of income, while Steven Hill points out the harmful effects of precarious work. – Sheila Regehr and Roderick Benns ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Lana Payne points out that even some of the world’s wealthiest individuals are highlighting the need for governments to step up in addressing major collective action problems such as climate change and inequality. And Angella MacEwen offers one important example of that principle being put into practice, writing ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Don Pittis examines the Cons’ record on jobs and the economy, and reaches the inevitable conclusion that free trade bluster and corporate giveaways have done nothing to help Canadians – which makes it no wonder the Cons are hiding the terms of the deals they sign. And John ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Kevin Carmichael compares the federal parties’ promises to help parents and concludes the NDP’s child care plan to hold far more social and economic benefit, while Natascia Lypny likewise finds that parents are more interested in actual affordable child-care spaces than tax baubles. CTV reports on the NDP’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Kate McInturff and David Macdonald address the need for an adult discussion about how federal policies affect Canadian families. And Kevin Campbell writes about the importance of child care as a social investment.  – Vincenzo Bove and Georgios Efthyvoulou study how public policy is shaped by political budget ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Linda McQuaig reminds us that while growing inequality may have different impacts on older workers as compared to younger ones, it arises based on fault lines which have nothing to do with age: (T)he suggestion that seniors as a group receive too much government support is absurd. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Colleen Flood writes that our health care system is more similar to the U.S.’ than we’d like to admit – and that many of the most glaring inefficiencies within it are already the result of services funded through private insurance rather than our universal public system: The latest ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading. – Pierre Beaulne discusses the inequality-related problems and solutions brought into the spotlight by Thomas Piketty, and notes that they can’t simply be swept under the rug: When all is said and done, the capitalist globalization has boosted economic growth for a certain time, but has by the same ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading. – Mariana Mazzucato writes about the need for governments to shape markets through their own investments, rather than acting only to serve existing business interests: The idea that at best the public sector can fix “market failures” and “de-risk” business, means that when the banks become too active in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: May 3, 2012

Thursday, May 3 saw yet another debate over the Cons’ use of time allocation – this time respecting the omnibus budget bill which features so many radical changes that demand serious discussion. And not surprisingly, the opposition parties raised plenty of entirely valid concerns, while the Cons obfuscated and ran out the clock. The Big ...

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: December 13, 2011

Tuesday, December 13 served to confirm the range of concerns that hadn’t yet been taken into account in the Cons’ seat redistribution bill – even as debate came to a close and the bill was rammed through against the protests of a united opposition. The Big Issue In response to the start and end of ...

Feminist Mom in Montreal: Music teacher dismissed for being a lesbian parent

This is an absolutely disgusting display of discrimination. Little Flower Academy, a Catholic school in Vancouver, knew that Lisa Reimer was a lesbian when they hired her to instruct their all girls choir. Reimer went on leave when her partner gave birth to a baby and was told not to come back after parents of ...

Feminist Mom in Montreal: Music teacher dismissed for being a lesbian parent

This is an absolutely disgusting display of discrimination. Little Flower Academy, a Catholic school in Vancouver, knew that Lisa Reimer was a lesbian when they hired her to instruct their all girls choir. Reimer went on leave when her partner gave birth to a baby and was told not to come back after parents of ...

Feminist Mom in Montreal: Music teacher dismissed for being a lesbian parent

This is an absolutely disgusting display of discrimination. Little Flower Academy, a Catholic school in Vancouver, knew that Lisa Reimer was a lesbian when they hired her to instruct their all girls choir. Reimer went on leave when her partner gave birth to a baby and was told not to come back after parents of ...