Canadian Political Viewpoints: You Get a P3! And You Get a P3! Everybody Gets a P3!

SOURCE: CBC News: Sask. Spending Millions on Companies that Bid on Work and LoseSOURCE: Leader Post: Sask. Government Gave $5.6 Million to Companies for Failed P3 Bids When it was announced earlier today that Brad Wall had sent off another prodding letter to the Federal Government to saber-rattle over the looming Carbon Tax; my first ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Dean Baker notes that a reduction in required work time could go a long way toward ensuring that workers share in productivity gains. – Meanwhile, Max Ehrenfreund writes about new research on the state of the U.S.’ middle class – showing that lifetime wage earnings peaked for people ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Vicki Nash challenges the claim that unemployment in a precarious economy is generally a matter of choice rather than the absence thereof. And Jia Tolentino argues that we shouldn’t pretend there’s any value in being forced to work oneself to death: It does require a fairly dystopian strain ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Heather Whiteside discusses how the privatization schemes being toyed with at all levels of government represent nothing more than reckless gambling with public money and goods: When a federal, provincial, or municipal government builds a bridge, a highway, a school, or a hospital, we know who owns ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Olivia Loveridge-Greene comments on new research showing how many workers may be forced to keep working into their 70s or beyond in order to be able to stay afloat. And Don Pittis explains why tax-free savings accounts and other giveaways to the wealthy won’t do anything to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Olivia Loveridge-Greene comments on new research showing how many workers may be forced to keep working into their 70s or beyond in order to be able to stay afloat. And Don Pittis explains why tax-free savings accounts and other giveaways to the wealthy won’t do anything to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jonathan Sas highlights why we’re best off having public services delivered by the public sector: The three decades long bashing and diminishing of the redistributive capacities of the state has led to pronounced inequality, degraded infrastructure stock, and a blunted ability of government to respond to current societal ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Simon Enoch and Christine Saulnier examine how P3s are used to privilege corporate profits over the public interest: The CCPA has published numerous publications on the question of P3s because they have been so pervasive and so riddled with problems. There have been books written. Our organization ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Paul Krugman writes about the dangers of Donald Trump’s crony capitalist infrastructure plan. And Tom Parkin warns us that Justin Trudeau’s Canadian equivalent is headed toward exactly the same results: A private infrastructure bank means paying more for financing. It means getting less infrastructure. Fewer construction jobs. Less ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Kevin Connor reports that the more Ontario voters are exposed to the realities of public-private partnerships, the more they’re turning against the idea – with a quarter or less of respondents seeing any upside to handing public services over to businesses. Tony Keller writes that Canada’s history of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Burning questions

How does a new U.S. president focusing on actual protectionism (not “trade barriers” in the form of the incidental effects of governance in the public interest) affect the viability of Brad Wall’s GTH and bypass projects which depend on perpetually expanding trade? And are we stuck with the multi-billion-dollar costs the Saskatchewan Party has tried ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Community Food Centres Canada highlights the need for social assistance benefits to keep up with the cost of living, while noting that Ontario (among other jurisdictions) has fallen well behind in that task: It’s been far too long since social assistance rates have been viewed through the ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how the City of Regina’s actual treatment of key information runs contrary to its stated commitment to open government. For further reading…– Natascia Lypny’s report on the City’s delays and denials of access to information about Regina’s new stadium and wastewater treatment plant is here.  – I previously wrote about the City’s initial ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Sherri Torjman discusses how the the gig economy is based mostly on evading protections for workers – and how the both employment law and social programs need to catch up: Much of the labour market is morphing into freelance or gigs. More and more Canadians are becoming ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Ed Broadbent, Michal Hay and Emilie Nicolas theorize that Canada’s left is on the rise. Matt Karp takes a look at the policy preferences of younger American voters, including a strong willingness to fund far better social programs than are currently available. And N+1 responds to the rise ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – George Monbiot discusses how neoliberal ideology has managed to take over as the default assumption in global governance – despite its disastrous and readily visible effects: (T)he past four decades have been characterised by a transfer of wealth not only from the poor to the rich, but within ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – John Quiggin examines – and refutes – a few key complaints about fairer taxes on the wealthy. But Kathryn May reports that the Cons are eager to use public resources to investigate and punish public servants who have exposed the problems with the Canada Revenue Agency, rather than ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Linda Tirado writes that whatever the language used as an excuse for turning public benefits into private profits, we should know better than to consider it credible: Given how much I had heard my whole life about British dignity, and the fact that there is a thing ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here (via PressReader), arguing that there’s no longer any escaping the fact that Brad Wall’s Saskatchewan Party can’t be trusted to be either honest or reasonable about its biggest and costliest decisions. For further reading…– Mike McKinnon reported here on the glaring gap between what Brad Wall knew about the failings of the Boundary Dam ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Les Leopold takes a look at the underpinnings of Bernie Sanders’ unexpectedly strong run for the Democratic presidential nomination. And Sean McElwee discusses the type of politics U.S. voters are rightly motivated to change, as big donors have been successful in dictating policy to both major parties. ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Balanced Budget Myopia Breaks Both Ways

Opinions on deficit budgeting have become a short-hand litmus test in Canadian politics. Deficits are left-wing and balanced budgets are right-wing austerity.  Economists know that there is virtually no difference between a small surplus and a small deficit, but politicians and voters are a different story. I have spent the past three and half years railing ...

Accidental Deliberations: Grifts within grifts

Shorter Saskatchewan Party Ministry of P3 Giveaways: There’s always a risk that the corporate giants we’re paying to take over government operations might be more interested in making money than the public interest. We’re pretty sure the only answer is to pay off more corporate giants.

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, reminding us that it’s our communities who ultimately pay the price for the poorly-thought-out election announcements from senior levels of government that we’ve seen so frequently recently. For further reading…– CTV reported on last week’s Evraz Place expansion announcement, while the Leader-Post offered an all-too-obvious example of cheerleading for a shiny new project while ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Daniel Tencer discusses the latest evidence that trickle-down economics are a fraud, while David Roberts and Javier Zarracina write about how the elite seems to get its own way even when the results are worse for everybody. And Heather Stewart reports on the IMF’s findings as to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Kevin Carson discusses David Graeber’s insight into how privatization and deregulation in their present form represent the ultimate use of state power to serve special interests at the expense of the public: What mainstream American political discourse calls “deregulation” is nothing of the sort. There is no ...