Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Linda Givetash reports on the increasing cost and decreasing availability of housing in Canada. And Patrick Greenfield and Sarah March note that an appalling increase in the number of homeless people in the UK is being reflected in the number of deaths on the street. – Tithi Bhattacharya ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Lana Payne offers her take on the need for Canada to catch up to the rest of the developed world in providing social supports: Canada is sitting at a dismal 17 per cent, down at the bottom of the pack with Ireland, Israel, and Latvia. No bragging ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Rochelle Toplensky reports that ten years after a financial meltdown based on the instability of top-down economic structures, multinational corporations are paying substantially lower effective tax rates than they did before. And Jim Tankersley and Alan Rappaport follow up on how the Trump tax giveaway to the wealthy ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – May Boeve and Michael Brune comment on the danger that political- and court-based attacks on U.S. unions could substantially weaken the progressive movement as a whole. But Jane McAlevey writes that West Virginia’s successful teachers’ strike may provide an important reminder that the power of collective action can ...

Accidental Deliberations: On historical perspective

I’ll give Roland Priddle this much: he’s absolutely right in his impression that the best way to argue for waving through expanded tar sands pipelines without an unbiased review is to pretend that nobody has learned anything about environmental protection, oil or dilbit spills, climate change, or energy industry trends over the past six-plus decades. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your Family Day reading. – Gloria Galloway reports on Jagmeet Singh’s strong case for fair tax revenues as a key highlight from the NDP’s federal convention: In his speech to delegates, Mr. Singh lamented income inequality, urged the protection of pensions, called for publicly funded pharmacare and dental and eye care, and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Harriet Agerholm comments on the connection between income inequality and a growing life expectancy gap between the rich and the rest of us. – May Bulman notes that after a generation of austerity, children of public sector workers are increasingly living in poverty in the UK. Miles Brignall ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Larry Elliott discusses how the stock market is reacting with disgust against rare good economic news for workers and the general public. Asher Schechter interviews Angus Deaton about the connection between monopolies, rent-seeking and burgeoning inequality. And Bill Kerry writes that we have ample reason to ask ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Joe Romm discusses new research showing that man-made greenhouse gas emissions have ended an 11,000-year era of climate stability. – Thomas Walkom points out the contradictions in Justin Trudeau’s declaration that there will be no federal climate policy without new pipelines. And David Climenhaga writes about the complete ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Julian Cribb reports on new research as to mass exposure to chemicals and pollutants: Almost every human being is now contaminated in a worldwide flood of industrial chemicals and pollutants – most of which have never been tested for safety – a leading scientific journal has warned. ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how the Saskatchewan Party’s sad excuse for a climate change strategy (PDF) is really aimed at nothing more than excusing continued carbon pollution. For further reading…– I wrote just a couple of weeks ago about the Saskatchewan public’s strong appetite for real action against climate change – making it all the more embarrassing ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Larry Elliott interviews Joseph Stiglitz about the rise of Donald Trump and other demagogues in the wake of public anger over inequality and economic unfairness. And Stiglitz also joins a group of economists calling for an end to austerity in the UK. – Phillip Mendonca-Vieira highlights how rent ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Peter Goodman examines how a basic income could relieve against some of the most harmful effects of capitalist economics. And Sarah O’Connor discusses the plight of towns which have been left behind by economic change. – Meanwhile, Matt Bruenig offers a reminder that most extreme high incomes are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Andre Picard argues that Bernie Sanders’ trip to highlight Canada’s health care system shouldn’t be taken as an indication we lack plenty of room for improvement. And Margot Sanger-Katz writes that Sanders indeed learned lessons about the holes in our health coverage. – David Suzuki discusses the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Rupert Neate reports on a new study showing that the world’s 1,500-odd billionaires between them control over $6 trillion in wealth. – Stuart Trew sets out Canada’s choice between corporate-oriented trade deals such as the CETA, or sustainable and fairly-distributed economic development. And Laurie Monsebraaten writes about the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Asad Abbasi reviews a new book following up on Thomas Piketty’s work on the causes of inequality. – Peter Goodman and Jonathan Soble point out that the combination of tight job markets and stagnant wages has become a consistent reality in the developed world – and that ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the Saskatchewan Party’s choice to poison our province rather than coming clean about the dangers of sour gas. For further reading…– I’ll link again to the reports from the National Observer and the Star on the sour gas hazard and cover-up, along with Emily Eaton’s take (and Elizabeth McSheffrey’s followup as to the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Breaking the silence

Needless to say, there will be plenty more to discuss about the Wall government has exposed residents of Saskatchewan’s oil patch to avoidable (and sometimes fatal) hazards in order to avoid acknowledging the dangers of fossil fuel development. But for now, there’s already plenty worth reading in the Price of Oil series, including two reports ...

Alberta Politics: Guest Post: In a democracy, quiet is rarely a good sign, and Alberta’s relationship with Big Oil is very quiet indeed

PHOTOS: Part of the Jackpine Oilsands Mine north of Fort McMurray, formerly owned by Shell and now operated by Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. (Photo: Pembina Institute.) Below: Author Kevin Taft. Guest Post by Kevin Taft Kevin Taft is a best-selling author, well-known speaker, and former provincial politician in Alberta. He served as an Alberta Liberal ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ben Steverman examines the unfairness of the U.S.’ tax system – which, like Canada’s, offers gratuitous giveaways to wealthy investors which force workers to pay more: Politicians have intentionally set tax rates on wages much higher than those on long-term investment returns. The U.S. has a progressive tax ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Des Cohen discusses how economic inequality has developed – and how it’s now rewarding people for doing nothing more than worsening its effects. And Chase Burghgrave interviews Elizabeth Anderson about the employer-based power which is used to keep American workers in line: You describe the authority of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Alex Collinson discusses how insecure work makes it impossible to reliably structure an individual’s life: Many respondents told us about how difficult it is to budget without knowing how much you’ll be earning from one week to the next. The number of hours we are given every ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Mark Holmgren writes that there’s no reason why we should allow poverty to continue in a country which has plenty of wealth to reduce it, while Patrick Butler notes that the conservative view of poverty as being solely the result of personal (lack of) merit is oblivious ...

Accidental Deliberations: On incentive programs

Let’s add a couple more points to Brad Wall’s attempt to hand out freebies to corporations in which he owns shares while the rest of Saskatchewan faces grinding austerity. First, the Saskatchewan Party’s spin (claiming there’s no conflict of interest under current rules) is based entirely on an opinion from the conflict of interest commissioner ...

Accidental Deliberations: Your money, his friends

So much for any talk of economic diversification, shared sacrifice or responsible budgeting – the Saskatchewan Party is on another corporate giveaway binge, and no amount of public money is off the table if it’ll buy a photo op with a CEO. Shorter Brad Wall today: PLZ MR. OIL BARONS TAKE ALL OF OUR MONEYZ!!!! ...