Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Des Cohen discusses how economic inequality has developed – and how it’s now rewarding people for doing nothing more than worsening its effects. And Chase Burghgrave interviews Elizabeth Anderson about the employer-based power which is used to keep American workers in line: You describe the authority of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Alex Collinson discusses how insecure work makes it impossible to reliably structure an individual’s life: Many respondents told us about how difficult it is to budget without knowing how much you’ll be earning from one week to the next. The number of hours we are given every ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Mark Holmgren writes that there’s no reason why we should allow poverty to continue in a country which has plenty of wealth to reduce it, while Patrick Butler notes that the conservative view of poverty as being solely the result of personal (lack of) merit is oblivious ...

Accidental Deliberations: On incentive programs

Let’s add a couple more points to Brad Wall’s attempt to hand out freebies to corporations in which he owns shares while the rest of Saskatchewan faces grinding austerity. First, the Saskatchewan Party’s spin (claiming there’s no conflict of interest under current rules) is based entirely on an opinion from the conflict of interest commissioner ...

Accidental Deliberations: Your money, his friends

So much for any talk of economic diversification, shared sacrifice or responsible budgeting – the Saskatchewan Party is on another corporate giveaway binge, and no amount of public money is off the table if it’ll buy a photo op with a CEO. Shorter Brad Wall today: PLZ MR. OIL BARONS TAKE ALL OF OUR MONEYZ!!!! ...

Accidental Deliberations: On pipelines to nowhere

I’ll be taking a look at the individual candidates in the NDP’s leadership race over the next little while. But before I start into that review, I’ll pause to discuss the most bizarre development of the leadership campaign so far. As I noted in reviewing the first debate, Peter Julian’s choice to brand himself largely ...

Alberta Politics: With Rachel Notley off to Texas, it helps to understand why Canadians and Texans are naturally simpatico

PHOTOS: The magnificent Texas State Capitol in Austin – taller that the U.S. Capitol in Washington! Below: The interior of that Texas dome and some musicians making the scene in Austin, which is not only warmer than Edmonton, it’s more liberal too, and the sort of thing I had in mind when I made the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Carol Linnitt notes that British Columbia’s provincial pipeline spill map has been conspicuously disappeared by the Clark Libs in the lead up to an election where environmental protection is a major issue. And Kathy Tomlinson is the latest to highlight both the glaring lack of reasonable fund-raising ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Carol Linnitt notes that British Columbia’s provincial pipeline spill map has been conspicuously disappeared by the Clark Libs in the lead up to an election where environmental protection is a major issue. And Kathy Tomlinson is the latest to highlight both the glaring lack of reasonable fund-raising ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Frances Ryan discusses the precarity facing far too many UK residents who are a single missed bill payment away from financial disaster: There are now 19 million people in this country living below the minimum income standard (an income required for what the wider public view as ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Frances Ryan discusses the precarity facing far too many UK residents who are a single missed bill payment away from financial disaster: There are now 19 million people in this country living below the minimum income standard (an income required for what the wider public view as ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Martin Kenney comments on Canada’s continuing role in “snow washing” offshore tax evasion. The Conference Board of Canada examines the massive gap between what Canada should receive in public revenues, and what’s actually taken in to keep our society functioning. And Kamal Ahmed highlights how employers are ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Claudia Chwalisz points out that in addition to relying on a distortionary electoral system, the Trudeau Libs’ majority was built on a bubble which now seems likely to pop. Michael Harris wagers that Canadians will remember the broken core promise when they go to the polls in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Naomi Klein writes that Donald Trump’s cabinet represents a direct takeover of the U.S. government by the corporate oligarchy – and comments on what the progressive movement needs to do to fight back: Let us be clear: This is not a peaceful transition of power. It’s a corporate ...

Accidental Deliberations: Deep thought

Some of us might offer a lot more outrage over the histrionics in response to Justin Trudeau’s statement of fact on the need to phase out fossil fuels if his own attack dogs hadn’t fomented the exact same hysteria when it suited their purposes.

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Dean Baker discusses some of the myths about the effects of corporate globalization – with particular attention to how our current trade and immigration structures are designed to provide easy profits for capital at the expense of labour around the world. And Jason Hickel reports on new research ...

Views from the Beltline: Pipelines, good-looking liberals and Hanoi Jane

Jane Fonda is unhappy with our prime minister. She has announced that “we shouldn’t be fooled by good-looking liberals.” Rachel Notley says Fonda doesn’t know what she’s talking about. I’m with Rachel. Ms. Fonda, an ardent environmentalist, believes that by supporting pipelines, Prime Minister Trudeau “has betrayed every one of the things that he committed ...

Views from the Beltline: Pipelines, good-looking liberals and Hanoi Jane

Jane Fonda is unhappy with our prime minister. She has announced that “we shouldn’t be fooled by good-looking liberals.” Rachel Notley says Fonda doesn’t know what she’s talking about. I’m with Rachel. Ms. Fonda, an ardent environmentalist, believes that by supporting pipelines, Prime Minister Trudeau “has betrayed every one of the things that he committed ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – James Wilt writes that the PR campaign pushing pipelines is based largely on the false claim that the only other choice is to allow even more dangerous means of facilitating the burning of fossil fuels. And David Suzuki argues that the cost of addressing obvious environmental problems ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your year. – Michelle Chen writes that wealth inequality and social stratification are only getting worse in the U.S. And Edwin Rios and Dave Gilson chart the diverging fates of the top .01% which is seeing massive gains, and the rest of the U.S.’ population facing continued income and wealth stagnation. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Vincent Bevins interviews Branko Milanovic about the economic roots of the working-class revolt against neoliberalism, while pointing out that there’s nothing inevitable about globalization harming large numbers of people in the developed world: Let’s start with the obvious question. Does the elephant graph explain Brexit and Trump?  Yes, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Juxtaposition

Brad Wall is perfectly happy to waste time tweeting his outrage at a business operating with both foreign and domestic suppliers. But Brad Wall couldn’t care less whether provincial money earmarked to clean up messes in Saskatchewan actually stays in the province – choosing instead to cut out local businesses entirely: The province’s Saskatchewan Oil ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Alex Himelfarb and Trish Hennessy offer their take as to what we should expect out of Ontario’s basic income experiment: Critics rightly argue that basic income is no magic bullet, that indeed there are no magic bullets. The history of the idea of basic income shows it’s no ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Lawrence Summers discusses the economic damage being done by a top-heavy income spectrum – as the effect of major stimulus programs may have been wholly outweighed by the decline in middle-class incomes. – Meanwhile, Canadians for Tax Fairness points out the impending tax court case which will bring ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – George Monbiot observes that while few people would want to drive animals to extinction directly, we’re all too often eager to settle for a consumerist culture which produces exactly that result. – Carol Linnitt reports on the Trudeau Libs’ appointment of an oil industry cheerleader to review the ...