Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2017 Candidate Profile: Niki Ashton

For Ashton alone among the NDP’s leadership candidates, we’ve been through this exercise before. But for a candidate who stood out for her youth in 2012, it’s remarkable how little has changed this time around. Strengths Once again, youth and expanded appeal are obvious priorities for all of the NDP’s leadership candidate. And for the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – Brian Jones rightly argues that a fair tax system would go a long way toward eliminating any serious concerns about government deficits. And Marco Chown Oved offers some reason for optimism in the Canada Revenue Agency’s response to the Panama Papers. – David Macdonald examines what could have ...

Politics and its Discontents: Just A Couple Of Questions

Given that I have no background in economics, I will leave it to more finely-tuned minds to debate the merits of yesterday’s federal budget. However, there are a couple of things that, from my perspective, need to be answered, and they both relate to the Infrastructure Bank the Liberal government is touting. Introduced in last ...

Politics and its Discontents: Not Like His Father At All

A few days ago I posted a letter by Star reader Cathy Allen in which she discussed what it would take for her to regain her pride as a Canadian. It was outstanding, and if you haven’t read it, click on the link before proceeding. In yesterday’s Star, Randy Gostling of Oshawa offered some of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Jo Littler writes about the illusion of meritocracy, and how it has contributed to the unconscionable spread of inequality: Over the past few decades, neoliberal meritocracy has been characterised by two key features. First, the sheer scale of its attempt to extend entrepreneurial competition into the nooks ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Chris Dillow examines a few of the reasons why neoliberalism hasn’t produced the promise of economic growth as the supposed benefit in exchange for dissolving social links. And William Berkson discusses the importance of an activist government in building a strong economy: The new books on the history ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Chris Dillow examines a few of the reasons why neoliberalism hasn’t produced the promise of economic growth as the supposed benefit in exchange for dissolving social links. And William Berkson discusses the importance of an activist government in building a strong economy: The new books on the history ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Louis-Philippe Rochon chimes in on why Justin Trudeau’s faux populism is entirely beyond belief when compared to his actions while in power: Since coming to power, the prime minister has openly pursued policies that have only exacerbated the economic situation by raising corporate profits, and by contributing to the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Louis-Philippe Rochon chimes in on why Justin Trudeau’s faux populism is entirely beyond belief when compared to his actions while in power: Since coming to power, the prime minister has openly pursued policies that have only exacerbated the economic situation by raising corporate profits, and by contributing to the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – François Côté-Vaillancourt suggests a greater focus on redistributing wealth and income to ensure a secure standard of living, rather than seeking primarily to put people to work: (I)nstead of fighting job losses, I would suggest that maybe the most important thing we could do would be to raise ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – François Côté-Vaillancourt suggests a greater focus on redistributing wealth and income to ensure a secure standard of living, rather than seeking primarily to put people to work: (I)nstead of fighting job losses, I would suggest that maybe the most important thing we could do would be to raise ...

Politics and its Discontents: An Ideological And Horticultural Taint

Although I am not a user of medical cannabis, the current scandal (and it can only be termed a scandal) regarding dangerous and forbidden pesticide use by companies with the Health Canada seal of approval is instructive. First, a recap of the situation is in order: After a string of recent recalls by Mettrum Ltd., ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – David Suzuki discusses the merits of a four-day work week in improving both working and living conditions:  It’s absurd that so many people still work eight hours a day, five days a week — or more — with only a few weeks’ vacation a year, often needing ...

Michal Rozworski: Trudeau’s Growth Council is back with more bad ideas

Justin Trudeau’s friends in finance, consulting and big business dominate the grandly named Advisory Council on Economic Growth. A few months after recommending a giant privatization scheme, the gang is back with more ideas, many very good for them but very bad for you and me. The biggest news: a recommendation to increase the retirement age from ...

Dead Wild Roses: My New Favourite Journalist – Caitlin Johnstone

  Much has happened in the world in the past few months. Especially since November 8, when the “left” or the “progressives” in the USA and indeed the world have been crapping their pants about some orange skinned person with homunculus like hands winning the seat of most powerful person in the world. While as concerning ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Branko Milanovic offers his take on how the U.S.’ version of liberalism paved the way for Donald Trump and his ilk both by buying into corporatist assumptions about success, and by treating electoralism as the basis for political organization: In economics, liberalism espoused “neo-liberalism” which was the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Anatole Kaletsky discusses the gross failures of market fundamentalism. And William Easterly points out that the risks to democratic governance which now seem to be materializing can be traced to the lack of a values-based defence of empowering people to decide their own future at the societal level. ...

Politics and its Discontents: Lethal Legacy – Part 2

In Part 1, I wrote about the lethal consequences for many who have worked at GE Peterborough. A toxic workplace that has resulted in crippling disease or death for many is not the kind of legacy these men and women anticipated. To compound the tragedy of the situation, Ontario’s Workplace Insurance and Safety Board has ...

Politics and its Discontents: Lethal Legacy: A Province’ s Version Of Neoliberalism

The Toronto Star has run a heartbreaking series, very well-worth reading, on the fate of many of the employees of Peterborough’s GE plant, whose lives were either cut short by, or are riddled with, disease thanks to exposure to a toxic brew of chemicals during their working lives. Entitled Lethal Legacy, it is a story ...

Politics and its Discontents: "The Cancer Of Inequality"

In a recent post well-worth reading, The Mound reflected on the decline of support for liberal democracy. Today, Star readers respond to an article carried by the paper entitled, How Stable Are Democracies? ‘Warning Signs Are Flashing Red’. Their message is clear: inequality is at the root of the problem, fostered and promoted by the ...

Politics and its Discontents: What A Pretty Face Conceals

When one thinks deeply about neoliberalism, one conjures up the face of greed, rapacity and monetary narcissism. Not at all a pretty face. But here in Canada, Thomas Walkom writes, neoliberalism is concealed by a human, some would say pretty, face, that of Justin Trudeau. The essence of neo-liberalism is globalization. Neo-liberals strive for a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Ben Tarnoff discusses the two winners – and the many losers – created by the spread of neoliberalism: Neoliberalism can mean many things, including an economic program, a political project, and a phase of capitalism dating from the 1970s. At its root, however, neoliberalism is the idea ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Murray Dobbin highlights how our political and economic discussions are poorer for the dominance of neoliberalism: That’s it? That’s the best the economics profession can come up with to explain Canadians’ indebtedness catastrophe? It’s all about human behaviour, written in stone, so I guess we might as well ...

The Disaffected Lib: A Primer for a Prime Minister

It’s almost impossible to discern how much our prime minister really understands about globalism and the neoliberal order. He claims he gets it but that’s far from clear. The prime ministerial confusion was manifest in his interview today in The Guardian.It was with some relief that I came upon a helpful treatise on neoliberalism by ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Simon Enoch and Christine Saulnier examine how P3s are used to privilege corporate profits over the public interest: The CCPA has published numerous publications on the question of P3s because they have been so pervasive and so riddled with problems. There have been books written. Our organization ...